heel


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Related to heel: Heel spur, heel pain

heel 1

 (hēl)
n.
1.
a. The rounded posterior portion of the human foot under and behind the ankle.
b. The corresponding part of the hind foot of other vertebrates.
c. A similar anatomical part, such as the fleshy rounded base of the human palm or the hind toe of a bird.
2.
a. The part, as of a sock, shoe, or stocking, that covers the heel.
b. The built-up portion of a shoe or boot, supporting the heel.
3. One of the crusty ends of a loaf of bread.
4. The lower or rearward part, as:
a. The part of the head of a golf club where it joins the shaft.
b. The end of a violin bow where the handle is located.
5. Nautical
a. The lower end of a mast.
b. The after end of a ship's keel.
6. Botany The basal end of a plant cutting or tuber used in propagation.
7. Oppression; tyranny: under the heel of Stalinism; the heel of an autocrat.
8. Informal A dishonorable or unscrupulous person.
v. heeled, heel·ing, heels
v.tr.
1.
a. To furnish with a heel or heels.
b. To repair or replace the heels, as for shoes.
2. Slang To furnish, especially with money.
3. To arm (a gamecock) with gaffs.
4. To press or strike with the heel: heel a horse.
v.intr.
To follow at one's heels: The dog won't heel.
Idioms:
down at the heel/heels
1. With the heel worn down. Used of shoes.
2. Shabby or poor in appearance.
lay by the heels
To put in fetters or shackles; imprison.
on/upon the heels of
1. Directly behind.
2. Immediately following.
out at the heel/heels
1. Having holes in one's socks or shoes.
2. Rundown; shabby; seedy.
take to (one's) heels
To run away; flee.
to heel
1. Close behind: The hound followed his master to heel.
2. Under discipline or control: The army swiftly brought the rebels to heel.

[Middle English, from Old English hēla.]

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heel2

heel 2

 (hēl)
intr. & tr.v. heeled, heel·ing, heels
To tilt or cause to tilt to one side.
n.
A tilt, as of a boat, to one side.

[Alteration of Middle English helden, from Old English hieldan.]

heel

(hiːl)
n
1. (Anatomy) the back part of the human foot from the instep to the lower part of the ankle. Compare calcaneus
2. (Zoology) the corresponding part in other vertebrates
3. (Clothing & Fashion) the part of a shoe, stocking, etc, designed to fit the heel
4. (Clothing & Fashion) the outer part of a shoe underneath the heel
5. (Clothing & Fashion) the part of the palm of a glove nearest the wrist
6. the lower, end, or back section of something: the heel of a loaf.
7. (Horticulture) horticulture the small part of the parent plant that remains attached to a young shoot cut for propagation and that ensures more successful rooting
8. (Nautical Terms) nautical
a. the bottom of a mast
b. the after end of a ship's keel
9. (Golf) the back part of a golf club head where it bends to join the shaft
10. (Rugby) rugby possession of the ball as obtained from a scrum (esp in the phrase get the heel)
11. slang a contemptible person
12. at one's heels on one's heels just behind or following closely
13. dig one's heels in See dig in5
14. down at heel
a. shabby or worn
b. slovenly or careless
15. kick one's heels cool one's heels to wait or be kept waiting
16. rock back on one's heels to astonish or be astonished
17. show a clean pair of heels to run off
18. take to one's heels to run off
19. to heel disciplined or under control, as a dog walking by a person's heel
vb
20. (Clothing & Fashion) (tr) to repair or replace the heel of (shoes, boots, etc)
21. (Dancing) to perform (a dance) with the heels
22. (Golf) (tr) golf to strike (the ball) with the heel of the club
23. (Rugby) rugby to kick (the ball) backwards using the sole and heel of the boot
24. to follow at the heels of (a person)
25. (Individual Sports, other than specified) (tr) to arm (a gamecock) with spurs
26. (Agriculture) (tr) NZ (of a cattle dog) to drive (cattle) by biting their heels
[Old English hēla; related to Old Norse hǣll, Old Frisian hêl]
ˈheelless adj

heel

(hiːl)
vb
(Nautical Terms) (of a vessel) to lean over; list
n
(Nautical Terms) inclined position from the vertical: the boat is at ten degrees of heel.
[Old English hieldan; related to Old Norse hallr inclined, Old High German helden to bow]

heel1

(hil)

n.
1. the back part of the foot in humans, below and behind the ankle.
2. the corresponding part in other vertebrates.
3. the part of a stocking, shoe, etc., covering the back part of the wearer's foot.
4. a solid raised base attached to the sole of a shoe or boot under the back part of the foot.
5. heels, high-heeled shoes.
6. something resembling the back part of the human foot, as in position or shape: a heel of bread.
7. the rear of the palm, adjacent to the wrist.
8. control; subjugation: under the heel of the dictator.
9. the latter or concluding part of something.
10. the lower end of any of various objects, as rafters, spars, or the sternposts of vessels.
11. the after end of the keel of a ship.
12. the crook in the head of a golf club.
13. the base of a cutting, tuber, or other part that is removed from a plant for use in propagation.
v.t.
14. to furnish with heels, as shoes.
15. to follow at the heels of; chase closely.
16. to strike, prod, or propel with the heel.
v.i.
17. (of a dog) to follow at one's heels on command.
18. to use the heels, as in dancing.
Idioms:
1. at one's heels, close behind one.
2. cool one's heels, to be kept waiting, esp. because of deliberate discourtesy.
3. down at (the) heel(s), dressed in shabby clothing; looking slovenly.
4. kick up one's heels, to have an unusually lively, entertaining time.
5. on or upon the heels of, closely following.
6. take to one's heels, to run away; take flight.
7. to heel,
a. close behind.
b. under control or subjugation.
[before 850; Middle English; Old English hēl(a), c. Middle Dutch hiele, Old Norse hǣll; akin to hock1]

heel2

(hil)

v. heeled, heel•ing,
n. v.i.
1. (esp. of a ship or boat) to incline to one side; cant; tilt.
v.t.
2. to cause to lean or cant.
n.
3. a heeling movement; cant.
[1565–75; variant of earlier heeld, Middle English helden, Old English hieldan to lean, slope; akin to Old English heald, Old Norse hallr sloping]

heel3

(hil)

n.
a contemptibly dishonorable or irresponsible person.
[1910–15, Amer.; perhaps from heel1]

heel

- The crusty ends of a loaf of bread are its heels.
See also related terms for heels.

heel


Past participle: heeled
Gerund: heeling

Imperative
heel
heel
Present
I heel
you heel
he/she/it heels
we heel
you heel
they heel
Preterite
I heeled
you heeled
he/she/it heeled
we heeled
you heeled
they heeled
Present Continuous
I am heeling
you are heeling
he/she/it is heeling
we are heeling
you are heeling
they are heeling
Present Perfect
I have heeled
you have heeled
he/she/it has heeled
we have heeled
you have heeled
they have heeled
Past Continuous
I was heeling
you were heeling
he/she/it was heeling
we were heeling
you were heeling
they were heeling
Past Perfect
I had heeled
you had heeled
he/she/it had heeled
we had heeled
you had heeled
they had heeled
Future
I will heel
you will heel
he/she/it will heel
we will heel
you will heel
they will heel
Future Perfect
I will have heeled
you will have heeled
he/she/it will have heeled
we will have heeled
you will have heeled
they will have heeled
Future Continuous
I will be heeling
you will be heeling
he/she/it will be heeling
we will be heeling
you will be heeling
they will be heeling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been heeling
you have been heeling
he/she/it has been heeling
we have been heeling
you have been heeling
they have been heeling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been heeling
you will have been heeling
he/she/it will have been heeling
we will have been heeling
you will have been heeling
they will have been heeling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been heeling
you had been heeling
he/she/it had been heeling
we had been heeling
you had been heeling
they had been heeling
Conditional
I would heel
you would heel
he/she/it would heel
we would heel
you would heel
they would heel
Past Conditional
I would have heeled
you would have heeled
he/she/it would have heeled
we would have heeled
you would have heeled
they would have heeled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heel - the bottom of a shoe or bootheel - the bottom of a shoe or boot; the back part of a shoe or boot that touches the ground and provides elevation
boot - footwear that covers the whole foot and lower leg
Cuban heel - a broad heel of medium height on women's shoes
French heel - a fairly high narrow heel on women's shoes
lift - one of the layers forming the heel of a shoe or boot
shoe - footwear shaped to fit the foot (below the ankle) with a flexible upper of leather or plastic and a sole and heel of heavier material
spike heel, stiletto heel, spike - a very high narrow heel on women's shoes
stacked heel - a heel made of many layers of leather
wedge heel, wedge - a heel that is an extension of the sole of the shoe
wineglass heel - a heel on a woman's shoe in the shape of a wineglass
bottom, underside, undersurface - the lower side of anything
2.heel - the back part of the human foot
foot, human foot, pes - the part of the leg of a human being below the ankle joint; "his bare feet projected from his trousers"; "armored from head to foot"
Achilles tendon, tendon of Achilles - a large tendon that runs from the heel to the calf
skeletal structure - any structure created by the skeleton of an organism
3.heel - someone who is morally reprehensibleheel - someone who is morally reprehensible; "you dirty dog"
perisher - bounder
scoundrel, villain - a wicked or evil person; someone who does evil deliberately
4.heel - one of the crusty ends of a loaf of bread
loaf, loaf of bread - a shaped mass of baked bread that is usually sliced before eating
end, terminal - either extremity of something that has length; "the end of the pier"; "she knotted the end of the thread"; "they rode to the end of the line"; "the terminals of the anterior arches of the fornix"
5.heel - the lower end of a ship's mast
end, terminal - either extremity of something that has length; "the end of the pier"; "she knotted the end of the thread"; "they rode to the end of the line"; "the terminals of the anterior arches of the fornix"
6.heel - (golf) the part of the clubhead where it joins the shaft
golf, golf game - a game played on a large open course with 9 or 18 holes; the object is use as few strokes as possible in playing all the holes
club head, clubhead, club-head, golf-club head - (golf) the head of the club which strikes the ball
part, portion - something less than the whole of a human artifact; "the rear part of the house"; "glue the two parts together"
Verb1.heel - tilt to one side; "The balloon heeled over"; "the wind made the vessel heel"; "The ship listed to starboard"
lean, tilt, angle, slant, tip - to incline or bend from a vertical position; "She leaned over the banister"
list, lean - cause to lean to the side; "Erosion listed the old tree"
2.heel - follow at the heels of a person
travel along, follow - travel along a certain course; "follow the road"; "follow the trail"
3.heel - perform with the heels; "heel that dance"
dancing, terpsichore, dance, saltation - taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music
dance - an artistic form of nonverbal communication
trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe, dance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"
4.heel - strike with the heel of the club; "heel a golf ball"
golf, golf game - a game played on a large open course with 9 or 18 holes; the object is use as few strokes as possible in playing all the holes
hit - cause to move by striking; "hit a ball"
5.heel - put a new heel on; "heel shoes"
fix, furbish up, mend, repair, bushel, doctor, touch on, restore - restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken; "She repaired her TV set"; "Repair my shoes please"

heel

1
noun
1. end, stump, remainder, crust, rump, stub the heel of a loaf of bread
2. (Slang) swine, cad (Brit. informal), scoundrel, scally (Northwest English dialect), bounder (old-fashioned Brit. slang), rotter (slang, chiefly Brit.), scumbag (slang), blackguard, cocksucker (taboo slang) Suddenly I feel like a total heel.
bring something or someone to heel subjugate, master, suppress, put down, tame, subdue, quell, hold sway over, bring (someone) to their knees, bring under the yoke The president will use his power to bring the republics to heel.
hard on the heels of something or someone straight after, immediately after, right behind, following on from Bad news has come hard on the heels of good.
take to your heels flee, escape, run away or off, take flight, hook it (slang), turn tail, show a clean pair of heels, skedaddle (informal), vamoose (slang, chiefly U.S.) He stood, for a moment, then took to his heels.

heel 1

verb
To follow closely or persistently:

heel 2

verb
To depart or cause to depart from true vertical or horizontal:
noun
Deviation from a particular direction:
Translations
عِقْب، كَعْبكَعْبكَعْب الحِذاءكَعْب الكَلْسَهيضَع كَعْبا للحِذاء
patapodpatekdát nový podpateknaklánět se
hælhældekrængeforsåle
kantapääkorkokanta
एड़ी
petapotpetica
megsarkal
hællhallast á hliîhæla, setja hæl undir
かかと
뒤꿈치
calx
gaišinti laikągreitai apsisuktiįkandin kokankintis belaukiantkulnas
papēdispiesist papēdisasvērties uz sāniem
dať nový podpätokpodpätok
peta
häl
kisigino
ส้นเท้า
topukyana yatmakökçeökçe takmak
ایڑی
gót chân

heel

1 [hiːl]
A. N
1. (Anat) → talón m
to turn on one's heeldar media vuelta
to keep to heel [+ dog] → seguir de cerca al dueño
to be at or on sb's heelspisar los talones a algn
to bring sb to heelsobreponerse a algn, meter a algn en cintura
to cool one's heelsestar plantado or de plantón
I decided to leave him to cool his heelsdecidí hacerle esperar un rato, decidí dejarlo plantado or de plantón un rato
to dig in one's heelsempecinarse
to drag one's heelsarrastrar los pies
to follow hard on sb's heelsseguir a algn muy de cerca
to follow hard on the heels of sthvenir a renglón seguido de algo
to be hot on sb's heelspisar los talones a algn
to kick one's heelsestar plantado or de plantón
to show sb a clean pair of heelshacer tragar polvo a algn
to take to one's heelsechar a correr, poner pies en polvorosa
to be under the heel ofestar bajo los talones de
2. [of sock] → talón m; [of shoe] → tacón m
to be down at heelir desharrapado
see also down-at-heel
3. (o.f.) (= person) → sinvergüenza mf, canalla mf
B. VT
1. [+ shoe] → poner tapas a
see also well-heeled
2. [+ ball] → taconear, dar de tacón a
C. VI heel!¡ven aquí!
D. CPD heel bar Nrápido m, tienda f de reparación de calzado en el acto

heel

2 [hiːl] VI (also to heel over) (Naut) → zozobrar, escorar

heel

[ˈhiːl]
n
[person] → talon m
to be at sb's heels [animal, person] → être sur les talons de qn
to be hot on sb's heels → marcher sur les talons de qn
to follow hard on the heels of sth [event] → arriver juste après qch
to bring to heel [+ dog] → faire venir à ses pieds; [+ person, group] → rappeler à l'ordre
to turn on one's heel (= turn round) → tourner les talons
to take to one's heels (= run away) → prendre ses jambes à son cou
to dig one's heels in (= be stubborn) → se braquer
to cool one's heels (= languish) → poireauter
to kick one's heels (British) (= wait around) → faire le pied de grue
[shoe] → talon m
shoes with high heels → des chaussures à talons hauts
to click one's heels → claquer des talons
heels npl (= high heeled shoes) → des talons hautsheel-bar [ˈhiːlbɑːr] ntalon-minute m

heel

1
n
Ferse f; (of shoe)Absatz m; the heel of the handder Handballen; I like to wear heelsich trage gerne Schuhe mit hohen Absätzen; with his dog/the children at his heelsgefolgt von seinem Hund/den Kindern; to be right on somebody’s heelsjdm auf den Fersen folgen; (fig: = chase) → jdm auf den Fersen sein; to follow hard upon somebody’s heelsjdm dicht auf den Fersen sein, sich an jds Fersen (acc)heften (geh); panic buying came hard on the heels of the government’s announcementHamsterkäufe folgten der Erklärung der Regierung auf dem Fuße; the police were hot on our heelsdie Polizei war uns dicht auf den Fersen; to be snapping at somebody’s heels (fig inf)jdm dicht auf den Fersen sein; to be down at heel (person) → abgerissen or heruntergekommen sein; (building) → heruntergekommen sein; to take to one’s heelssich aus dem Staub(e) machen, Fersengeld geben (dated, hum); to show somebody a clean pair of heels (= escape)vor jdm davonlaufen, jdm die Fersen zeigen (geh); (= leave behind)jdm weit voraus sein, jdn weit hinter sich lassen; heel! (to dog) → (bei) Fuß!; he brought the dog to heeler befahl dem Hund, bei Fuß zu gehen; to bring somebody to heeljdn an die Kandare nehmen (inf); to turn or spin on one’s heelauf dem Absatz kehrtmachen; to cool or kick one’s heels (inf: = wait) → warten; (= do nothing)Däumchen drehen; to set or rock somebody back on his/her etc heels (fig inf)jdm einen Schock versetzen
(of golf club)Ferse f; (of loaf)Kanten m; (of mast)Fuß m
(dated pej sl, = person) → Saukerl m (sl)
vt
to heel shoesauf Schuhe neue Absätze machen; these shoes need heelingdiese Schuhe brauchen neue Absätze
(Rugby) ballhakeln

heel

2 (Naut)
vi (ship: also heel over) → krängen (spec), → sich (auf die Seite) legen or neigen; to heel hard oversich stark auf die Seite legen, stark krängen (spec)
vtkrängen lassen (spec), → sich seitlich überlegen lassen
n(seitliches) Überlegen, Seitenneigung f

heel

1 [hiːl]
1. n
a. (of foot, sock) → tallone m, calcagno; (of shoe) → tacco
heel, boy! (to dog) → qui!
to bring sb to heel (fig) → riportare qn all'ordine
to be at sb's heels → stare alle calcagna di qn
to take to one's heels (liter) → darsela a gambe
to turn on one's heel → girare i tacchi
b. (fam) (person) → carogna
2. vt (shoe) → fare or rifare i tacchi a; (ball) → colpire di tacco

heel

2 [hiːl] vi (also heel over) (ship, truck) → inclinarsi (pericolosamente)

heel

(hiːl) noun
1. the back part of the foot. I have a blister on my heel.
2. the part of a sock etc that covers this part of the foot. I have a hole in the heel of my sock.
3. the part of a shoe, boot etc under or round the heel of the foot. The heel has come off this shoe.
verb
1. to put a heel on (a shoe etc).
2. (usually with over) (of ships) to lean to one side. The boat heeled over in the strong wind.
-heeled
high-heeled shoes.
at/on one's heels
close behind one. The thief ran off with the policeman close on his heels.
kick one's heels
to be kept waiting. I was left kicking my heels for half an hour.
take to one's heels
to run away. The thief took to his heels.
to heel
(of dogs etc) at a person's heel. You must teach your dog to walk to heel in a busy street.
turn on one's heel
to turn one's back (and walk off).

heel

كَعْب pata hæl Ferse φτέρνα talón kantapää talon peta tacco かかと 뒤꿈치 hiel hæl pięta calcanhar пятка häl ส้นเท้า topuk gót chân 脚后跟

heel

n. talón, calcañal, parte posterior redondeada del pie.

heel

n (of the foot or hand) talón m; (of the sole of a shoe) tacón m; — cup talonera; high-heeled de tacón alto; low-heeled de tacón bajo
References in classic literature ?
That stupid high heel turned and gave me a sad wrench.
The piece of glass broken out at the corner of the window just nipped off the bare heel of the boy standing motionless and looking with rapt eyes into the face of the Christ.
When she saw it lying there, she stamped her heel upon it, striving to crush it.
Notwithstanding a constant application of his one armed heel to the flanks of the mare, the most confirmed gait that he could establish was a Canterbury gallop with the hind legs, in which those more forward assisted for doubtful moments, though generally content to maintain a loping trot.
The schoolmaster now bestowed both whip and heel upon the starveling ribs of old Gunpowder, who dashed forward, snuffling and snorting, but came to a stand just by the bridge, with a suddenness that had nearly sent his rider sprawling over his head.
But once, the mood was on him too deep for common regardings; and as with heavy, lumber-like pace he was measuring the ship from taffrail to mainmast, Stubb, the odd second mate, came up from below, and with a certain unassured, deprecating humorousness, hinted that if Captain Ahab was pleased to walk the planks, then, no one could say nay; but there might be some way of muffling the noise; hinting something indistinctly and hesitatingly about a globe of tow, and the insertion into it, of the ivory heel.
Yes; and many is the time, when, after the severest uninterrupted labors, which know no night; continuing straight through for ninety-six hours; when from the boat, where they have swelled their wrists with all day rowing on the Line, --they only step to the deck to carry vast chains, and heave the heavy windlass, and cut and slash, yea, and in their very sweatings to be smoked and burned anew by the combined fires of the equatorial sun and the equatorial try-works; when, on the heel of all this, they have finally bestirred themselves to cleanse the ship, and make a spotless dairy room of it; many is the time the poor fellows, just buttoning the necks of their clean frocks, are startled by the cry of There she blows
They had ground him beneath their heel, they had devoured all his substance; they had murdered his old father, they had broken and wrecked his wife, they had crushed and cowed his whole family; and now they were through with him, they had no further use for him--and because he had interfered with them, had gotten in their way, this was what they had done to him
So saying, he turned quickly on his heel, and shut the door after him.
He was in old-time iron armor from head to heel, with a helmet on his head the shape of a nail-keg with slits in it; and he had a shield, and a sword, and a pro- digious spear; and his horse had armor on, too, and a steel horn projecting from his forehead, and gorgeous red and green silk trappings that hung down all around him like a bedquilt, nearly to the ground.
I set the umbrella slowly and carefully on end against the wall, but as soon as I took my hand away, its heel slipped from under it, and down it came again with another bang.
Well, when I catched that glimpse of that boot heel, the idea that went smashing through my head was, I know where he's hid the di'monds