heeled


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heel 1

 (hēl)
n.
1.
a. The rounded posterior portion of the human foot under and behind the ankle.
b. The corresponding part of the hind foot of other vertebrates.
c. A similar anatomical part, such as the fleshy rounded base of the human palm or the hind toe of a bird.
2.
a. The part, as of a sock, shoe, or stocking, that covers the heel.
b. The built-up portion of a shoe or boot, supporting the heel.
3. One of the crusty ends of a loaf of bread.
4. The lower or rearward part, as:
a. The part of the head of a golf club where it joins the shaft.
b. The end of a violin bow where the handle is located.
5. Nautical
a. The lower end of a mast.
b. The after end of a ship's keel.
6. Botany The basal end of a plant cutting or tuber used in propagation.
7. Oppression; tyranny: under the heel of Stalinism; the heel of an autocrat.
8. Informal A dishonorable or unscrupulous person.
v. heeled, heel·ing, heels
v.tr.
1.
a. To furnish with a heel or heels.
b. To repair or replace the heels, as for shoes.
2. Slang To furnish, especially with money.
3. To arm (a gamecock) with gaffs.
4. To press or strike with the heel: heel a horse.
v.intr.
To follow at one's heels: The dog won't heel.
Idioms:
down at the heel/heels
1. With the heel worn down. Used of shoes.
2. Shabby or poor in appearance.
lay by the heels
To put in fetters or shackles; imprison.
on/upon the heels of
1. Directly behind.
2. Immediately following.
out at the heel/heels
1. Having holes in one's socks or shoes.
2. Rundown; shabby; seedy.
take to (one's) heels
To run away; flee.
to heel
1. Close behind: The hound followed his master to heel.
2. Under discipline or control: The army swiftly brought the rebels to heel.

[Middle English, from Old English hēla.]

heel 2

 (hēl)
intr. & tr.v. heeled, heel·ing, heels
To tilt or cause to tilt to one side.
n.
A tilt, as of a boat, to one side.

[Alteration of Middle English helden, from Old English hieldan.]

heel 3

 (hēl)
tr.v. heeled, heel·ing, heels
To cover the roots of (a plant) with soil temporarily, as while preparing for a more permanent planting. Often with in: heeled in the apple saplings until the orchard had been laid out.

[Middle English helen, partly from Old English helian, to cover, heel in, and partly from Old English helan, to hide, conceal; see kel- in Indo-European roots.]

heeled

(hiːld)
adj
a. having a heel or heels
b. (in combination): high-heeled.
References in classic literature ?
It really was a violent storm, approaching a hurricane in force, and at one time it seemed as though the craft, having been heeled far over under a staggering wave that swept her decks, would not come back to an even keel.
The crowd washed back sudden, and then broke all apart, and went tearing off every which way, and Buck Harkness he heeled it after them, looking tolerable cheap.
Not stopping to look again, I wrenched the horse's head hard round to the right and in another moment the dog cart had heeled over upon the horse; the shafts smashed noisily, and I was flung sideways and fell heavily into a shallow pool of water.
Doubtless there was another sort of fascination at work--that subtle physical attraction which delights in cheating our psychological predictions, and in compelling the men who paint sylphs, to fall in love with some bonne et brave femme, heavy- heeled and freckled.
As we were almost constantly on a wind, and the breeze was not a little stiff, the ship heeled to leeward very considerably; and whenever her starboard side was to leeward, the sliding door between the cabins slid open, and so remained, nobody taking the trouble to get up and shut it.
It was just enough to alter the equilibrium; the whole coach heeled over like a ship and crashed through the fringe of bushes over the cliff.