hegemony

(redirected from hegemonies)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to hegemonies: Hegemons

he·gem·o·ny

 (hĭ-jĕm′ə-nē, hĕj′ə-mō′nē)
n. pl. he·gem·o·nies
The predominance of one state or social group over others.

[Greek hēgemoniā, from hēgemōn, leader; see hegemon.]

heg′e·mon′ic (hĕj′ə-mŏn′ĭk) adj.
he·gem′o·nism n.
he·gem′o·nist adj. & n.

hegemony

(hɪˈɡɛmənɪ; hɪˈdʒɛmənɪ)
n, pl -nies
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) ascendancy or domination of one power or state within a league, confederation, etc, or of one social class over others
[C16: from Greek hēgemonia authority, from hēgemōn leader, from hēgeisthai to lead]
hegemonic, hegemonical, hegemonial adj

he•gem•o•ny

(hɪˈdʒɛm ə ni, ˈhɛdʒ əˌmoʊ ni)

n., pl. -nies.
leadership, predominant influence, or domination, esp. as exercised by one nation over others.
[1560–70; < Greek hēgemonía leadership, supremacy =hēgemṓn leader + -ia -y3]
heg•e•mon•ic (ˌhɛdʒ əˈmɒn ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hegemony - the dominance or leadership of one social group or nation over others; "the hegemony of a single member state is not incompatible with a genuine confederation"; "to say they have priority is not to say they have complete hegemony"; "the consolidation of the United States' hegemony over a new international economic system"
form of government, political system - the members of a social organization who are in power

hegemony

noun domination, leadership, dominance, sway, supremacy, mastery, upper hand, ascendancy, pre-eminence, predominance the economic world hegemony of the West
Translations

hegemony

[hɪˈgemənɪ] Nhegemonía f

hegemony

[hɪˈgɛməni] nhégémonie f

hegemony

nHegemonie f
References in periodicals archive ?
Hegemonies of Language and Their Discontents: The Southwest North American Region Since 1540
He distinguishes between singular (one superpower) and collective (a concert of great powers) hegemonies, and between hegemonies that apply to the whole of the international system and those that apply to some coalitional subsystem.
His overall themes are the three hegemonies of historical capitalism; the rise of capital; industry, empire, and the "endless" accumulation of capital; and the long 20th century.