helium I


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helium I

n.
Liquid helium existing as a normal fluid between the superfluid transition point of approximately 2.2°K at 1 atmosphere pressure and its boiling point of 4.2°K.
References in periodicals archive ?
Demand came from such applications as superconductivity research, which fueled the development of MRI; from welding, where helium is used as a shielding gas; and from semiconductor and optical fiber production.
Helium is essential to many applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); fiber optics and semiconductor manufacturing; metallurgy; breathing atmospheres for deep diving or unique blood gas medical mixtures; lifting for high altitude scientific research balloons, blimps; and other advanced applications.
Helium is predominantly extracted during natural gas processing.
It is forecast that the demand for Helium is expected to witness maximum growth from Asia Pacific region as almost all the end user industries are witnessing robust growth in the region such as MRI, Optical Fiber, Cryogenics, Welding, Electronics, Diving, etc.
Because of its unique properties, helium is used in many fields such as medical diagnosis, scientific research, high-tech manufacturing and space exploration.
Helium is the second element of the periodic table and is one of the most abundant elements in the universe, yet it is fairly rare on Earth.
A world shortage of liquid helium is expected to remain severe at least until the second half of 2013.
Helium is the only element that can remain at a sufficiently cold temperature to allow for the stable and uniform magnetic field the MRI scanners need to work.
Helium is produced as a by-product of natural gas refinement.
Worldwide demand for helium is ballooning," says Bureau of Land Management spokesman Hans Smart.
Superfluid helium does not support the formation of bubbles within the target chambers, and more importantly, the small-angle neutron scattering cross-section of superfluid helium is smaller than normal liquid helium by a factor of 5 [11,12].
According to theory, when liquid helium is pushed through a tiny hole at ultracold temperatures, the substance oscillates at a frequency that, when amplified electronically, sounds like a whistle.