helping

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help·ing

 (hĕl′pĭng)
n.
A single portion of food.

helping

(ˈhɛlpɪŋ)
n
(Cookery) a single portion of food taken at a meal

help•ing

(ˈhɛl pɪŋ)

n.
a portion of food served to one person.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.helping - an individual quantity of food or drink taken as part of a mealhelping - an individual quantity of food or drink taken as part of a meal; "the helpings were all small"; "his portion was larger than hers"; "there's enough for two servings each"
meal, repast - the food served and eaten at one time
mouthful, taste - a small amount eaten or drunk; "take a taste--you'll like it"
drumstick - the lower joint of the leg of a fowl
second joint, thigh - the upper joint of the leg of a fowl
white meat, breast - meat carved from the breast of a fowl
wing - the wing of a fowl; "he preferred the drumsticks to the wings"
medallion - a circular helping of food (especially a boneless cut of meat); "medallions of veal"
oyster - a small muscle on each side of the back of a fowl
parson's nose, pope's nose - the tail of a dressed fowl
slice, piece - a serving that has been cut from a larger portion; "a piece of pie"; "a slice of bread"
round of drinks, round - a serving to each of a group (usually alcoholic); "he ordered a second round"
drink - a single serving of a beverage; "I asked for a hot drink"; "likes a drink before dinner"
libation - a serving (of wine) poured out in honor of a deity
small indefinite amount, small indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is below average size or magnitude

helping

noun portion, serving, ration, piece, dollop (informal), plateful extra helpings of ice-cream

helping

noun
An individual quantity of food:
Translations
حِصَّه، مِقْدار
porce
portion
ételadag
matarskammtur
porcija

helping

[ˈhelpɪŋ]
A. ADJ to give or lend sb a helping handecharle una mano a algn
B. Nporción f, ración f
he came back for second helpingsvino a servirse más

helping

[ˈhɛlpɪŋ] nportion fhelping hand ncoup m de main
to give sb a helping hand, to lend sb a helping hand → donner un coup de main à qn

helping

n (at table, fig) → Portion f; to take a second helping of somethingsich (dat)noch einmal von etw nehmen; he even had a third helpinger nahm sich (dat)sogar noch eine dritte Portion; the public appetite for huge helpings of nostalgiadas Bedürfnis der Öffentlichkeit nach großen Portionen Nostalgie
adj attr to give or lend a helping hand to somebodyjdm helfen, jdm behilflich sein; if you want a helping hand …wenn Sie Hilfe brauchen, …

helping

[ˈhɛlpɪŋ] nporzione f
you've had two helpings of dessert already → ti sei già servito due volte di dolce

help

(help) verb
1. to do something with or for someone that he cannot do alone, or that he will find useful. Will you help me with this translation?; Will you please help me (to) translate this poem?; Can I help?; He fell down and I helped him up.
2. to play a part in something; to improve or advance. Bright posters will help to attract the public to the exhibition; Good exam results will help his chances of a job.
3. to make less bad. An aspirin will help your headache.
4. to serve (a person) in a shop. Can I help you, sir?
5. (with can(not), ~could (not)) to be able not to do something or to prevent something. He looked so funny that I couldn't help laughing; Can I help it if it rains?
noun
1. the act of helping, or the result of this. Can you give me some help?; Your digging the garden was a big help; Can I be of help to you?
2. someone or something that is useful. You're a great help to me.
3. a servant, farmworker etc. She has hired a new help.
4. (usually with no) a way of preventing something. Even if you don't want to do it, the decision has been made – there's no help for it now.
ˈhelper noun
We need several helpers for this job.
ˈhelpful adjective
a very helpful boy; You may find this book helpful.
ˈhelpfully adverb
ˈhelpfulness noun
ˈhelping noun
the amount of food one has on one's plate. a large helping of pudding.
ˈhelpless adjective
needing the help of other people; unable to do anything for oneself. A baby is almost completely helpless.
ˈhelplessly adverb
ˈhelplessness noun
help oneself
1. (with to) to give oneself or take (food etc). Help yourself to another piece of cake; `Can I have a pencil?' `Certainly – help yourself; He helped himself to (= stole) my jewellery.
2. (with cannot, ~could not) to be able to stop (oneself). I burst out laughing when he told me – I just couldn't help myself.
help out
to help (a person), usually for a short time because the person is in some difficulty. I help out in the shop from time to time; Could you help me out by looking after the baby?
References in classic literature ?
Send me, however, another half-rouble if you can (though that half-rouble will stab me to the heart--stab me with the thought that it is not I who am helping you, but YOU who are helping ME).
Prince Andrew had gone out into the hall, and, turning his shoulders to the footman who was helping him on with his cloak, listened indifferently to his wife's chatter with Prince Hippolyte who had also come into the hall.
I am helping to lay up food for the winter," said the Ant, "and recommend you to do the same.
I am very miserable about Sir James Martin, and have no other way in the world of helping myself but by writing to you, for I am forbidden even speaking to my uncle and aunt on the subject; and this being the case, I am afraid my applying to you will appear no better than equivocation, and as if I attended to the letter and not the spirit of mamma's commands.
It's in hand, though; and young Tom, who rather sticks to business at present - something new for him; he hadn't the schooling I had - is helping.
One small, helping cause of all this liveliness in Stubb, was soon made strangely manifest.
And for this reason, I said, money and honour have no attraction for them; good men do not wish to be openly demanding payment for governing and so to get the name of hirelings, nor by secretly helping themselves out of the public revenues to get the name of thieves.
He's helping her--or pretending to help her, I don't know which--to find the man who murdered poor Mr.
In her early letters to Tom she had always sent her love to Philip, and asked many questions about him, which were answered by brief sentences about Tom's toothache, and a turf-house which he was helping to build in the garden, with other items of that kind.
With him the problems are all soluble by the enlightened and regenerate will; there is no baffling Fate, but a helping God.
For in seeing the sufferer suffering--thereof was I ashamed on account of his shame; and in helping him, sorely did I wound his pride.
at an early stage and helping me with many valuable suggestions; also to Mr.