herald


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her·ald

 (hĕr′əld)
n.
1. A person who carries or proclaims important news; a messenger.
2. One that gives a sign or indication of something to come; a harbinger: The crocus is a herald of spring.
3. An official whose specialty is heraldry.
4.
a. An official formerly charged with making royal proclamations and bearing messages of state between sovereigns.
b. An official who formerly made proclamations and conveyed challenges at a tournament.
tr.v. her·ald·ed, her·ald·ing, her·alds
1. To proclaim, especially with enthusiasm; announce or acclaim: cheers that heralded the team's arrival.
2. To be a sign of; foreshadow: The discovery heralds a new era in drug treatment.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, of Germanic origin; see koro- in Indo-European roots.]

herald

(ˈhɛrəld)
n
1.
a. a person who announces important news
b. (as modifier): herald angels.
2. often literary a forerunner; harbinger
3. (Heraldry) the intermediate rank of heraldic officer, between king-of-arms and pursuivant
4. (Historical Terms) (in the Middle Ages) an official at a tournament
vb (tr)
5. to announce publicly
6. to precede or usher in
[C14: from Old French herault, of Germanic origin; compare Old English here war; see wield]

her•ald

(ˈhɛr əld)

n.
1. a royal or official messenger, esp. one representing a monarch in an ambassadorial capacity during wartime.
2. a person or thing that precedes or comes before; forerunner; harbinger: the swallows, heralds of spring.
3. a person or thing that proclaims or announces.
4. (in the Middle Ages) an officer who arranged tournaments and other functions, announced challenges, marshaled combatants, etc.
5. an officer of a body concerned with armorial bearings, genealogies, etc., esp. an officer ranking between a king-of-arms and a pursuivant.
v.t.
6. to give tidings of; proclaim; publicize.
7. to signal the coming of; usher in.
[1300–50; Middle English herau(l)d < Old French herau(l)t < Frankish *heriwald=*heri army + *wald commander (see wield)]

herald

- Etymologically, a "leader of an army," from Germanic kharjaz, "army."
See also related terms for leader.

herald


Past participle: heralded
Gerund: heralding

Imperative
herald
herald
Present
I herald
you herald
he/she/it heralds
we herald
you herald
they herald
Preterite
I heralded
you heralded
he/she/it heralded
we heralded
you heralded
they heralded
Present Continuous
I am heralding
you are heralding
he/she/it is heralding
we are heralding
you are heralding
they are heralding
Present Perfect
I have heralded
you have heralded
he/she/it has heralded
we have heralded
you have heralded
they have heralded
Past Continuous
I was heralding
you were heralding
he/she/it was heralding
we were heralding
you were heralding
they were heralding
Past Perfect
I had heralded
you had heralded
he/she/it had heralded
we had heralded
you had heralded
they had heralded
Future
I will herald
you will herald
he/she/it will herald
we will herald
you will herald
they will herald
Future Perfect
I will have heralded
you will have heralded
he/she/it will have heralded
we will have heralded
you will have heralded
they will have heralded
Future Continuous
I will be heralding
you will be heralding
he/she/it will be heralding
we will be heralding
you will be heralding
they will be heralding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been heralding
you have been heralding
he/she/it has been heralding
we have been heralding
you have been heralding
they have been heralding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been heralding
you will have been heralding
he/she/it will have been heralding
we will have been heralding
you will have been heralding
they will have been heralding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been heralding
you had been heralding
he/she/it had been heralding
we had been heralding
you had been heralding
they had been heralding
Conditional
I would herald
you would herald
he/she/it would herald
we would herald
you would herald
they would herald
Past Conditional
I would have heralded
you would have heralded
he/she/it would have heralded
we would have heralded
you would have heralded
they would have heralded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.herald - (formal) a person who announces important newsherald - (formal) a person who announces important news; "the chieftain had a herald who announced his arrival with a trumpet"
formality - compliance with formal rules; "courtroom formality"
courier, messenger - a person who carries a message
2.herald - something that precedes and indicates the approach of something or someone
indicant, indication - something that serves to indicate or suggest; "an indication of foul play"; "indications of strain"; "symptoms are the prime indicants of disease"
Verb1.herald - foreshadow or presageherald - foreshadow or presage    
tell - let something be known; "Tell them that you will be late"
2.herald - praise vociferouslyherald - praise vociferously; "The critics hailed the young pianist as a new Rubinstein"
applaud - express approval of; "I applaud your efforts"
3.herald - greet enthusiastically or joyfully
greet, recognise, recognize - express greetings upon meeting someone

herald

verb
1. indicate, promise, precede, pave the way, usher in, harbinger, presage, portend, foretoken Their discovery could herald a cure for some forms of impotence.
2. announce, publish, advertise, proclaim, broadcast, trumpet, publicize Tonight's clash is being heralded as the match of the season.
noun
1. (Often literary) forerunner, sign, signal, indication, token, omen, precursor, harbinger I welcome the report as the herald of more freedom, not less.
2. messenger, courier, proclaimer, announcer, crier, town crier, bearer of tidings Jill hovered by the hearth while the herald delivered his news.

herald

noun
One that indicates or announces someone or something to come:
verb
To make known the presence or arrival of:
Translations
مُنادٍ، رسوليُعْلِن قُرْب، يُؤْذِنُ بمجيء
heroldzvěstovat
sendebudvarsle
boîberikallari; sendiboîi
heraldikaheraldinisheroldasšauklys
vēstītvēstnesisziņnesis
heroldzvestovať
habercihabercisi olmak

herald

[ˈherəld]
A. N (= messenger) → heraldo m (fig) → precursor(a) m/f
B. VT (fig) → anunciar

herald

[ˈhɛrəld]
n
(= person) → héraut m
(= precursor) → précurseur m
The festival is the herald of a new age → Le festival est le précurseur d'une nouvelle époque.
vtannoncer
to be heralded as sth (= trumpeted) → être salué(e) comme qch

herald

n
(Hist) → Herold m; (in newspaper titles) → Bote m
(fig)(Vor)bote m (geh); herald of springFrühlingsbote m
(Her) College of HeraldsHeroldsamt nt
vt arrival of summerankündigen, Vorbote(n) sein für; to herald (in) a new ageden Beginn eines neuen Zeitalters ankündigen; tonight’s game is being heralded as the match of the seasondas Spiel heute Abend wird als die Begegnung der Saison groß herausgebracht

herald

[ˈhɛrld]
1. naraldo (fig) → messaggero
2. vtannunciare

herald

(ˈherəld) noun
formerly, a person who carries and reads important messages and notices (eg from a king). The king sent out heralds to announce the new law.
verb
to announce or be a sign of. A sharp wind often heralds a storm.
heˈraldic (-ˈrӕl-) adjective
of heraldry.
ˈheraldry noun
the study of coats of arms, crests etc and of the history of the families who have the right to use them.
References in classic literature ?
Soft, mildly, and cheerfully contemplative, with full, red lips, just on the verge of a smile, which the eyes seemed to herald by a gentle kindling-up of their orbs
Will their wealth be spent for the purpose--will they build colleges and churches to teach you, will they print papers to herald your progress, and organize political parties to guide and carry on the struggle?
Then I gave public notice by herald and trumpet that I should be busy with affairs of state for a fortnight, but about the end of that time I would take a moment's leisure and blow up Merlin's stone tower by fires from heaven; in the meantime, whoso listened to evil re- ports about me, let him beware.
It is printed on both sides, of course; but in such large type that its entire contents could be put, in HERALD type, upon a single page of the HERALD--and there would still be room enough on the page for the ZEITUNG's "supplement" and some portion of the ZEITUNG's next day's contents.
I can now conjecture readily that this streak of light was, in all likelihood, a gleam from a lantern carried by some one across the lawn: but then, prepared as my mind was for horror, shaken as my nerves were by agitation, I thought the swift darting beam was a herald of some coming vision from another world.
In reality, it was the forerunner of approaching catastrophe -- the formidable herald of the end.
On the farther side of the slope they halted and sent a herald forward to demand what the People of the Axe would have from them.
He then commanded his trumpet to sound a defiance to the challengers, and desired a herald to announce to them, that he should make no election, but was willing to encounter them in the order in which they pleased to advance against him.
If I were the grand-vizir I would order you a hundred blows from a bullock whip, and would have you led round the town accompanied by a herald who should proclaim your crimes.
Then the trumpet sounded, and the crowd became silent while the herald announced the terms of the contest.
Then calling to him his herald or crier, he would order him to mount on top of the lodge and summon all the tribe to bring in their peltries, and trade with the white man.
For instance, assuming to myself the power of marshalling the aforesaid procession, I direct a trumpeter to send forth a blast loud enough to be heard from hence to China; and a herald, with world-pervading voice, to make proclamation for a certain class of mortals to take their places.