heraldic


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he·ral·dic

 (hə-răl′dĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to heralds or heraldry.

he·ral′di·cal·ly adv.

heraldic

(hɛˈrældɪk)
adj
1. (Heraldry) of or relating to heraldry
2. of or relating to heralds
heˈraldically adv

he•ral•dic

(hɛˈræl dɪk, hə-)

adj.
of or pertaining to heralds or heraldry.
[1765–75]
he•ral′di•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.heraldic - indicative of or announcing something to come; "the Beatles were heraldic of a new style of music"
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray
2.heraldic - of or relating to heraldry
Translations
شِعاري
heraldický
heraldisk
címertani
skjaldarmerkja-
heraldický
armacılığa ait

heraldic

[heˈrældɪk] ADJheráldico

heraldic

[həˈrældɪk] adjhéraldique

heraldic

adjheraldisch; heraldic armsWappen pl

heraldic

[hɛˈrældɪk] adjaraldico/a

herald

(ˈherəld) noun
formerly, a person who carries and reads important messages and notices (eg from a king). The king sent out heralds to announce the new law.
verb
to announce or be a sign of. A sharp wind often heralds a storm.
heˈraldic (-ˈrӕl-) adjective
of heraldry.
ˈheraldry noun
the study of coats of arms, crests etc and of the history of the families who have the right to use them.
References in classic literature ?
He stared for a while at the leaves overhead, moving in a heraldic wind of the day.
We have no aristocracy of blood, and having therefore as a natural, and indeed as an inevitable thing, fashioned for ourselves an aristocracy of dollars, the display of wealth has here to take the place and perform the office of the heraldic display in monarchical countries.
It was called the d'Urberville Window, and in the upper part could be discerned heraldic emblems like those on Durbeyfield's old seal and spoon.
Athos was a great seigneur compared with such nobles as the king improvised by touching with his artificial scepter the parched-up trunks of the heraldic trees of the province.
Cornelius was a scholar, and was wealthy, -- at least he had been before the confiscation of his property; Cornelius belonged to the merchant-bourgeoisie, who were prouder of their richly emblazoned shop signs than the hereditary nobility of their heraldic bearings.
And though the third thing isn't so very heraldic, it would be more heraldic to suppose it a tower crowned with laurel than with fire; and it looks just as like it.
So that not the fierce-fanged tiger in his heraldic coat can so stagger courage as the white-shrouded bear or shark.
presented herself to them, clad in a fine robe bearing the heraldic device of the ship of the city of Paris.
Our old friends the Crawleys' family house, in Great Gaunt Street, still bore over its front the hatchment which had been placed there as a token of mourning for Sir Pitt Crawley's demise, yet this heraldic emblem was in itself a very splendid and gaudy piece of furniture, and all the rest of the mansion became more brilliant than it had ever been during the late baronet's reign.
Neither party would listen to the antiquaries who delivered learned lectures in the neighbourhood, showing the Bleeding Heart to have been the heraldic cognisance of the old family to whom the property had once belonged.
Ogg's and its neighborhood were there; and it would have been worth while to come even from a distance, to see the fine old hall, with its open roof and carved oaken rafters, and great oaken folding-doors, and light shed down from a height on the many-colored show beneath; a very quaint place, with broad faded stripes painted on the walls, and here and there a show of heraldic animals of a bristly, long-snouted character, the cherished emblems of a noble family once the seigniors of this now civic hall.
Well, then, your government would do well to choose from the past something better than the things that I have noticed on your monuments, and which have no heraldic meaning whatever.