herdsman


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herds·man

 (hûrdz′mən)
n.
A man who herds, tends, or manages livestock.

herdsman

(ˈhɜːdzmən)
n, pl -men
(Agriculture) chiefly Brit a person who breeds, rears, or cares for cattle or (rarely) other livestock in the herd. US equivalent: herder

herds•man

(ˈhɜrdz mən)

n., pl. -men.
1. the keeper of a herd, esp. of cattle or sheep.
2. (cap.) the constellation Boötes.
[1595–1605]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.herdsman - someone who drives a herdherdsman - someone who drives a herd    
goat herder, goatherd - a person who tends a flock of goats
hired hand, hired man, hand - a hired laborer on a farm or ranch; "the hired hand fixed the railing"; "a ranch hand"
sheepherder, sheepman, shepherd - a herder of sheep (on an open range); someone who keeps the sheep together in a flock
pigman, swineherd - a herder or swine

herdsman

noun (Chiefly Brit.) stockman, drover, grazier, cowman, cowherd The herdsman came calling the cattle for milking.
Translations
راعي الماشِيَه
-kapastýř
hyrde
csordás
hjarîmaîur, hirîir

herdsman

[ˈhɜːdzmən] N (herdsmen (pl)) [of cattle] → vaquero m; [of sheep] → pastor m

herdsman

[ˈhɜːrdzmən] ngardien m de troupeau

herdsman

nHirt m, → Hirte m

herd

(həːd) noun
a group of animals of one kind that stay, or are kept, together. a herd of cattle; a herd of elephant(s).
verb
to gather together, or be brought together, in a group. The dogs herded the sheep together; The tourists were herded into a tiny room.
-herd
a person who looks after a herd of certain kinds of animals. a goat-herd.
ˈherdsman (ˈhəːdz-) noun
a person who looks after a herd of animals.
the herd instinct
the tendency to behave, think etc like everyone else.
References in classic literature ?
I see in my mind a herd of wild creatures swarming over the earth, and to each the herdsman has affixed some barbarous sound in his own dialect.
Farewell, father," they answered, "go warily, lest we be left like cattle without a herdsman, wandering and desolate.
So counsel'd hee, and both together went Into the thickest Wood, there soon they chose The Figtree, not that kind for Fruit renown'd, But such as at this day to INDIANS known In MALABAR or DECAN spreds her Armes Braunching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended Twigs take root, and Daughters grow About the Mother Tree, a Pillard shade High overarch't, and echoing Walks between; There oft the INDIAN Herdsman shunning heate Shelters in coole, and tends his pasturing Herds At Loopholes cut through thickest shade: Those Leaves They gatherd, broad as AMAZONIAN Targe, And with what skill they had, together sowd, To gird thir waste, vain Covering if to hide Thir guilt and dreaded shame; O how unlike To that first naked Glorie.
After having in vain endeavoured to select the most beaten path, in hopes it might lead to the cottage of some herdsman, or the silvan lodge of a forester, and having repeatedly found himself totally unable to determine on a choice, the knight resolved to trust to the sagacity of his horse; experience having, on former occasions, made him acquainted with the wonderful talent possessed by these animals for extricating themselves and their riders on such emergencies.
Save a herdsman, who seemed to have caught something of the nature and expression of the beasts he tended, they met no one until they approached the village, where, on the brow of an acclivity, masculine humanity appeared in the shape of two curates: one tall, thin, close-shaven, with a book under his arm, and his neck craned forward; the other middle-sized, robust, upright, and aggressive, with short black whiskers, and an air of protest against such notions as that a clergyman may not marry, hunt, play cricket, or share the sports of honest laymen.
Mademoiselle, whose heart was beating like a lizard caught by a herdsman, sat heroically still on her sofa, beside the fire in the salon.
And here is your recompense,' said the traveller, offering the young herdsman some small pieces of money.
In that country a man who could do without sleep might earn double wages, one as a herdsman of cattle, and another as a shepherd, for they work much the same by night as they do by day.
On she went at the quiet pace of a cow going homeward to the barn yard; and, every moment, Cadmus expected to see a milkmaid approaching with a pail, or a herdsman running to head the stray animal, and turn her back towards the pasture.
The narrative commenced by a description of a Saxon peasant's hut, situated within the confines of a great, leafless, winter forest; it represented an evening in December; flakes of snow were falling, and the herdsman foretold a heavy storm; he summoned his wife to aid him in collecting their flock, roaming far away on the pastoral banks of the Thone; he warns her that it will be late ere they return.
He would never know how sure a breeder was his new bull--the son of that fine creature he had imported; two cows he had spotted as not paying their board could go on for months eating good alfalfa and bran before a new herdsman might become convinced of their unreadiness to turn the expensive feed into white gold; he had not written down the dates when the sows were to farrow, and they might have litters somewhere around the strawstack and crush half the little pigs.
She still went with the herd, but could not help the herdsman any longer.