hereditary


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Related to hereditary: Hereditary angioedema, Hereditary hemochromatosis

he·red·i·tar·y

 (hə-rĕd′ĭ-tĕr′ē)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to heredity or inheritance.
b. Transmitted or capable of being transmitted genetically from parent to offspring: a hereditary disease.
2.
a. Passed down from one generation to the next: a hereditary prejudice.
b. Being such or possessed by reason of birth: a hereditary aristocracy.
3. Law
a. Capable of being inherited.
b. Descending from an ancestor to a legal heir; passing down by inheritance.
c. Having title or possession through inheritance.

[Middle English, from Latin hērēditārius, from hērēditās, inheritance; see heredity.]

he·red′i·tar′i·ly (-târ′ə-lē) adv.
he·red′i·tar′i·ness n.

hereditary

(hɪˈrɛdɪtərɪ; -trɪ)
adj
1. (Biology) of, relating to, or denoting factors that can be transmitted genetically from one generation to another
2. (Law) law
a. descending or capable of descending to succeeding generations by inheritance
b. transmitted or transmissible according to established rules of descent
3. derived from one's ancestors; traditional: hereditary feuds.
4. (Mathematics) maths logic
a. (of a set) containing all those elements which have a given relation to any element of the set
b. (of a property) transferred by the given relation, so that if x has the property P and xRy, then y also has the property P
heˈreditarily adv
heˈreditariness n

he•red•i•tar•y

(həˈrɛd ɪˌtɛr i)

adj.
1. passing, or capable of passing, naturally from parent to offspring through the genes.
2. of or pertaining to inheritance or heredity.
3. existing by reason of feelings or opinions held by predecessors; ancestral: a hereditary enemy.
4. Law.
a. descending by inheritance.
b. transmitted or transmissible in the line of descent by force of law.
c. holding title, rights, etc., by inheritance: a hereditary proprietor.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin hērēditārius=hērēdit(ās) (see heredity) + -ārius -ary]
he•red`i•tar′i•ly (-ˈtɛər ə li) adv.
he•red′i•tar`i•ness, n.
syn: See innate.

he·red·i·tar·y

(hə-rĕd′ĭ-tĕr′ē)
Passed or capable of being passed from parent to offspring by means of genes: a hereditary trait.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.hereditary - occurring among members of a family usually by heredity; "an inherited disease"; "familial traits"; "genetically transmitted features"
heritable, inheritable - capable of being inherited; "inheritable traits such as eye color"; "an inheritable title"
2.hereditary - inherited or inheritable by established rules (usually legal rules) of descenthereditary - inherited or inheritable by established rules (usually legal rules) of descent; "ancestral home"; "ancestral lore"; "hereditary monarchy"; "patrimonial estate"; "transmissible tradition"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
heritable, inheritable - capable of being inherited; "inheritable traits such as eye color"; "an inheritable title"

hereditary

adjective
1. genetic, inborn, inbred, transmissible, inheritable In men, hair loss is hereditary.

hereditary

adjective
1. Of or from one's ancestors:
2. Possessed at birth:
Translations
dědičný
arvelig
perinnöllinen
nasljedan
örökletes
arf-/ættgengur
遺伝的な
유전성의
dedičný
ärftlig
เป็นกรรมพันธุ์
di truyền

hereditary

[hɪˈredɪtərɪ] ADJhereditario
hereditary diseaseenfermedad f hereditaria

hereditary

[hɪˈrɛdɪtəri] adj [disease] → héréditaire

hereditary

adj factor, characteristicerblich, angeboren; ruler, title, position, righterblich; hereditary disease or illnessErbkrankheit f, → erbliche Krankheit; hereditary peer Peer, der seine Peerswürde geerbt hat; hereditary monarchErbmonarch(in) m(f)

hereditary

[hɪˈrɛdɪtrɪ] adjereditario/a

heredity

(həˈredəti) noun
the passing on of qualities (eg appearance, intelligence) from parents to children.
heˈreditary adjective
(able to be) passed on in this way. Is musical ability hereditary?

hereditary

وِرَاثِيّ dědičný arvelig erblich κληρονομικός hereditario perinnöllinen héréditaire nasljedan ereditario 遺伝的な 유전성의 erfelijk arvelig dziedziczny hereditário наследственный ärftlig เป็นกรรมพันธุ์ kalıtsal di truyền 世袭的

he·red·i·tar·y

a. hereditario-a; que se trasmite por herencia.

hereditary

adj hereditario
References in classic literature ?
If the latter, gratitude must close our mouths; but if the former, both Cora and I shall have need to draw largely on that stock of hereditary courage which we boast, even before we are made to encounter the redoubtable Montcalm.
A colonial mansion, a hereditary estate, I would say a haunted house, and reach the height of romantic felicity--but that would be asking too much of fate!
At two or three epochs, when the fortunes of the family were low, this representative of hereditary qualities had made his appearance, and caused the traditionary gossips of the town to whisper among themselves, "Here is the old Pyncheon come again
From father to son, for above a hundred years, they followed the sea; a grey-headed shipmaster, in each generation, retiring from the quarter-deck to the homestead, while a boy of fourteen took the hereditary place before the mast, confronting the salt spray and the gale which had blustered against his sire and grandsire.
Scorning a turnstile wheel at her reverend helm, she sported there a tiller; and that tiller was in one mass, curiously carved from the long narrow lower jaw of her hereditary foe.
What are the Duke of Dunder's hereditary towns and hamlets but Fast-Fish?
His idea was a republic, with- out privileged orders, but with a hereditary royal family at the head of it instead of an elective chief magistrate.
Tell her boldly that he knew who she was, and that he felt (what she must feel) that he had a hereditary right to help and protect her as his father's son.
Still, there was one position worse than the present: it was the position he would be in when the ugly secret was disclosed; and the desire that continually triumphed over every other was that of warding off the evil day, when he would have to bear the consequences of his father's violent resentment for the wound inflicted on his family pride--would have, perhaps, to turn his back on that hereditary ease and dignity which, after all, was a sort of reason for living, and would carry with him the certainty that he was banished for ever from the sight and esteem of Nancy Lammeter.
His friends, and he had many, who, as well as Cedric, were passionately attached to him, contended that this sluggish temper arose not from want of courage, but from mere want of decision; others alleged that his hereditary vice of drunkenness had obscured his faculties, never of a very acute order, and that the passive courage and meek good-nature which remained behind, were merely the dregs of a character that might have been deserving of praise, but of which all the valuable parts had flown off in the progress of a long course of brutal debauchery.
The hereditary dominions of the Emperor of Germany contain a great extent of fertile, cultivated, and populous territory, a large proportion of which is situated in mild and luxuriant climates.
The same title has been bestowed on Venice, where absolute power over the great body of the people is exercised, in the most absolute manner, by a small body of hereditary nobles.