hermit


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to hermit: hermit thrush

her·mit

 (hûr′mĭt)
n.
1. A person who has withdrawn from society and lives a solitary existence; a recluse.
2. A cookie made with molasses, raisins, and nuts.

[Middle English heremite, from Old French, from Medieval Latin herēmīta, from Late Latin erēmīta, from Greek erēmītēs, from erēmiā, desert, from erēmos, solitary.]

her·mit′ic, her·mit′i·cal adj.
her·mit′i·cal·ly adv.

hermit

(ˈhɜːmɪt)
n
1. (Christian Churches, other) one of the early Christian recluses
2. any person living in solitude
[C13: from Old French hermite, from Late Latin erēmīta, from Greek erēmitēs living in the desert, from erēmia desert, from erēmos lonely]
herˈmitic, herˈmitical adj
herˈmitically adv
ˈhermit-ˌlike adj

her•mit

(ˈhɜr mɪt)

n.
1. a person who has withdrawn to a solitary place for a life of religious seclusion.
2. any person living in seclusion; recluse.
3. an animal of solitary habits.
4. a spiced molasses cookie often containing raisins or nuts.
[1175–1225; Middle English (h)ermite, heremite < Old French < Late Latin erēmīta < Greek erēmītḗs living in a desert, from erḗm(ia) desert, derivative of erêmos desolate]
her•mit′ic, adj.
her′mit•ry, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hermit - one retired from society for religious reasonshermit - one retired from society for religious reasons
eremite - a Christian recluse
2.hermit - one who lives in solitudehermit - one who lives in solitude    
lone hand, lone wolf, loner - a person who avoids the company or assistance of others

hermit

noun recluse, monk, loner (informal), solitary, anchorite, anchoress, stylite, eremite He lived like a hermit despite his fortune in shares and property.
Translations
ناسِك
poustevník
eneboereremit
einsetumaîur
atsiskyrėlio būstasatsiskyrėlis
vientuļnieks
pustovník
inzivaya çekilmiş kimse

hermit

[ˈhɜːmɪt]
A. Nermitaño/a m/f
B. CPD hermit crab Nermitaño m

hermit

[ˈhɜːrmɪt] nermite m

hermit

nEinsiedler(in) m(f) (also fig), → Eremit(in) m(f)

hermit

[ˈhɜːmɪt] neremita m

hermit

(ˈhəːmit) noun
a person who lives alone, especially to devote himself to religion.
ˈhermitage (-tidʒ) noun
the place where a hermit lives.
hermit crab
a soft-bodied crab that inhabits the empty shells of other creatures.
References in classic literature ?
There stand his trees, each with a hollow trunk, as if a hermit and a crucifix were within; and here sleeps his meadow, and there sleep his cattle; and up from yonder cottage goes a sleepy smoke.
Oh, thou foundling fire, thou hermit immemorial, thou too hast thy incommunicable riddle, thy unparticipated grief.
For every walk is a sort of crusade, preached by some Peter the Hermit in us, to go forth and reconquer this Holy Land from the hands of the Infidels.
Right so the king and Merlin departed, and went until an hermit that was a good man and a great leech.
He had ten of them, and when fifty years old he left them, and sought out as dismal a refuge from the world as possible, and became a hermit in order that he might reflect upon pious themes without being disturbed by the joyous and other noises from the nursery, doubtless.
Joe was for being a hermit, and living on crusts in a remote cave, and dying, some time, of cold and want and grief; but after listening to Tom, he conceded that there were some conspicuous advantages about a life of crime, and so he consented to be a pirate.
I used at first to wonder what comfort Traddles found in drawing skeletons; and for some time looked upon him as a sort of hermit, who reminded himself by those symbols of mortality that caning couldn't last for ever.
I mean the meeting of the King with Friar Tuck at the cell of that buxom hermit.
Before a caress has had time to cool, a strenuous revulsion seizes me: I long to return to my old lonely ascetic hermit life; to my dry books; my Socialist propagandism; my voyage of discovery through the wilderness of thought.
There had been mad wilful rejections, monstrous forms of self-torture and self-denial, whose origin was fear and whose result was a degradation infinitely more terrible than that fancied degradation from which, in their ignorance, they had sought to escape; Nature, in her wonderful irony, driving out the anchorite to feed with the wild animals of the desert and giving to the hermit the beasts of the field as his companions.
The larger significance of the telephone is that it completes the work of eliminating the hermit and gypsy elements of civilization.
On the other hand, I see that Amadis of Gaul, without losing his senses and without doing anything mad, acquired as a lover as much fame as the most famous; for, according to his history, on finding himself rejected by his lady Oriana, who had ordered him not to appear in her presence until it should be her pleasure, all he did was to retire to the Pena Pobre in company with a hermit, and there he took his fill of weeping until Heaven sent him relief in the midst of his great grief and need.