hermit


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Related to hermit: hermit thrush

her·mit

 (hûr′mĭt)
n.
1. A person who has withdrawn from society and lives a solitary existence; a recluse.
2. A cookie made with molasses, raisins, and nuts.

[Middle English heremite, from Old French, from Medieval Latin herēmīta, from Late Latin erēmīta, from Greek erēmītēs, from erēmiā, desert, from erēmos, solitary.]

her·mit′ic, her·mit′i·cal adj.
her·mit′i·cal·ly adv.

hermit

(ˈhɜːmɪt)
n
1. (Christian Churches, other) one of the early Christian recluses
2. any person living in solitude
[C13: from Old French hermite, from Late Latin erēmīta, from Greek erēmitēs living in the desert, from erēmia desert, from erēmos lonely]
herˈmitic, herˈmitical adj
herˈmitically adv
ˈhermit-ˌlike adj

her•mit

(ˈhɜr mɪt)

n.
1. a person who has withdrawn to a solitary place for a life of religious seclusion.
2. any person living in seclusion; recluse.
3. an animal of solitary habits.
4. a spiced molasses cookie often containing raisins or nuts.
[1175–1225; Middle English (h)ermite, heremite < Old French < Late Latin erēmīta < Greek erēmītḗs living in a desert, from erḗm(ia) desert, derivative of erêmos desolate]
her•mit′ic, adj.
her′mit•ry, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hermit - one retired from society for religious reasonshermit - one retired from society for religious reasons
eremite - a Christian recluse
2.hermit - one who lives in solitudehermit - one who lives in solitude    
lone hand, lone wolf, loner - a person who avoids the company or assistance of others

hermit

noun recluse, monk, loner (informal), solitary, anchorite, anchoress, stylite, eremite He lived like a hermit despite his fortune in shares and property.
Translations
ناسِك
poustevník
eneboereremit
einsetumaîur
atsiskyrėlio būstasatsiskyrėlis
vientuļnieks
pustovník
inzivaya çekilmiş kimse

hermit

[ˈhɜːmɪt]
A. Nermitaño/a m/f
B. CPD hermit crab Nermitaño m

hermit

[ˈhɜːrmɪt] nermite m

hermit

nEinsiedler(in) m(f) (also fig), → Eremit(in) m(f)

hermit

[ˈhɜːmɪt] neremita m

hermit

(ˈhəːmit) noun
a person who lives alone, especially to devote himself to religion.
ˈhermitage (-tidʒ) noun
the place where a hermit lives.
hermit crab
a soft-bodied crab that inhabits the empty shells of other creatures.
References in classic literature ?
The episode with Makovkina had occurred after five years of his hermit life.
His first cure occurred in the eighth year of his life as a hermit.
Joe was for being a hermit, and living on crusts in a remote cave, and dying, some time, of cold and want and grief; but after listening to Tom, he conceded that there were some conspicuous advantages about a life of crime, and so he consented to be a pirate.
You see a pirate don't have to do ANYTHING, Joe, when he's ashore, but a hermit HE has to be praying considerable, and then he don't have any fun, anyway, all by himself that way.
Not far from this," said the cousin, "there is a hermitage, where there lives a hermit, who they say was a soldier, and who has the reputation of being a good Christian and a very intelligent and charitable man.
The holy hermit who dwelt at the head of the valley, a full hour's journey away, from whom he had heard the tale of the great cities where dwelt people--poor souls
I mean the meeting of the King with Friar Tuck at the cell of that buxom hermit.
The Black Wolf dead, Red Shandy and John Flory wounded, James Flory, One Eye Kanty and Peter the Hermit prisoners
He had ten of them, and when fifty years old he left them, and sought out as dismal a refuge from the world as possible, and became a hermit in order that he might reflect upon pious themes without being disturbed by the joyous and other noises from the nursery, doubtless.
Before a caress has had time to cool, a strenuous revulsion seizes me: I long to return to my old lonely ascetic hermit life; to my dry books; my Socialist propagandism; my voyage of discovery through the wilderness of thought.
I had arrived at that well-known portion of the story where Ethelred, the hero of the Trist, having sought in vain for peaceable admission into the dwelling of the hermit, proceeds to make good an entrance by force.
Right so the king and Merlin departed, and went until an hermit that was a good man and a great leech.