heteronomy


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heteronomy

1. the state or condition of being ruled, governed, or under the sway of another, as in a military occupation.
2. the state or condition of being under the influence or domination, in a moral, spiritual, or similar sense, of another person, entity, force, etc. Cf. autonomy.heteronomous, adj.
See also: Government
the condition of being under the moral control of something or someone external; inability to be self-willing. — heteronymous, adj.
See also: Will
the condition of being under the rule or domination of another.
See also: Politics
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References in periodicals archive ?
They replace such narratives with stories of the itinerancy of their embodiments and the itinerant situatedness of disability in its relation to dependency and heteronomy.
Whereas in the real world, Crawford writes, "we are subject to the heteronomy of things; the hazards of material reality," what Kant has given us is our modern identification of freedom with choice, in which choice is a "pure flashing forth" of the individual will.
The empire talks back: orality, heteronomy and the cultural turn in interpretation studies.
The heteronomy of the epistemological apparatus, where that which is, is brought forth by the disparate power of that which is not, is a corollary of Renaissance accommodation of extensional reality to the embraces of infinity.
The only cure for this heteronomy and ultimate self-dispersion is to choose the good in the moment of truth.
A]ccidents" or "plan"; "victim" or "ruler"--the "cloud-scaling swing" includes them all, not exactly by reconciling chance and necessity, heteronomy and autonomy, but through the very movement of oscillation.
Discuss the terms, authority, obedience, disobedience, resistance, protest, heteronomy and autonomy, norms, rules, values, permission, in-group/out-group, conflict management, conflict resolution, win-win, socialization, modeling, peer support, and incremental learning.
If God is not programmed into human nature, then choosing God is heteronomy, not theonomy.
The face of the other person in its need--its "destitution"--is to Levinas a revelation, a commandment that cannot be refused; the working principle of his philosophy is not autonomy but heteronomy.
We are better served by leaving nature behind and maintaining a largely post-Kantian reformulation of the dichotomy between the self-conscious realm of autonomy and the natural realm of heteronomy and natural necessity.
Arguing that art's complicity and heteronomy leave it no meaningful, transformative function, he encouraged artists to abandon the institutional theory of art, which is based on the assumption of an ontological difference between what is denominated as art, on the one hand, and nonart, on the other.
The Kurds, in general, are prone to heteronomy, the opposite of autonomy, which refers to regulation by "otherness" and thus by forces "other than," or alien to, the self.