hexameter


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hex·am·e·ter

 (hĕk-săm′ĭ-tər)
n.
1. Verse written in lines of six metrical feet, especially classical verse in which the first four feet of each line are either dactylic or spondaic, the fifth dactylic, and the sixth spondaic.
2. A single line of such verse.

[Latin, from Greek hexametros, having six metrical feet : hexa-, hexa- + metron, meter; see meter1.]

hex′a·met′ric (hĕk-sə-mĕt′rĭk), hex′a·met′ri·cal (-rĭ-kəl) adj.

hexameter

(hɛkˈsæmɪtə)
n
1. (Poetry) a verse line consisting of six metrical feet
2. (Poetry) (in Greek and Latin epic poetry) a verse line of six metrical feet, of which the first four are usually dactyls or spondees, the fifth almost always a dactyl, and the sixth a spondee or trochee
hexaˈmetral, hexametric, ˌhexaˈmetrical adj

hex•am•e•ter

(hɛkˈsæm ɪ tər)

n.
1. a line of verse having six metrical feet.
adj.
2. consisting of six metrical feet.
[1540–50; < Latin < Greek hexámetros; see hexa-, meter2]
hex`a•met′ric (-səˈmɛ trɪk) hex`a•met′ri•cal, hex•am′e•tral, adj.

hexameter

a verse having six metrical feet. — hexametrical, adj.
See also: Verse

hexameter

A metrical line of six feet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hexameter - a verse line having six metrical feet
verse line, verse - a line of metrical text
Translations

hexameter

[hekˈsæmɪtəʳ] Nhexámetro m

hexameter

nHexameter m
References in classic literature ?
Your stool limps like one of Martial's distiches; it has one hexameter leg and one pentameter leg.
     And a head of hexameter hair.
It is odd therefore, that the one apposite passage which recurred to me in its entirety was in hexameters and pentameters
When the monarch inquired from what city Homer came, and whose son he was, the priestess delivered a response in hexameters after this fashion:
In Ultimo Adios, Joaquin notes that Rizal's use of the hexameter (a line of verse consisting of six metrical feet) or the so-called "heroic line" for the first time.
Where al-Mala'ika uses the mutadarik or "continuous" meter in Arabic, for example, I use anapestic hexameter, English's answer to Arabic's most galloping verse form.
The Papyrus Ibscher, from the first century BC, contains a hexameter text referring to the journey of Theseus and Peirithoos to the Underworld where Peirithoos takes Persephone as his wife.
Die Hexameter werden durch haufige Enjambements uberschritten wie die Leidensfahigkeit des Ich; aber weder der Hexameter noch das Ich durfen zugrunde gehen.
Lucretius chose to write a long poem about Epicurean philosophy in dactylic hexameter, the same verse pattern employed by Homer for his epic narratives.
I trace the implicit connections between the political, the aesthetic, and the erotic in poems that experiment with some form of the hexameter and in the criticism in which he comments on prosodical matters.
The team behind the performances got to this point by experimenting with whether it is possible for a contemporary actor to read the hexameter if he or show knows enough of the subject matter and uses the rules that go along with it.
Syphilis, an epyllion written in Virgilian dactylic hexameter and dedicated to Cardinal Pietro Bembo, was a 16th-century best-seller: by 1935 there were over a hundred editions, including 15 in Italian and seven in English.