hiding


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hide 1

 (hīd)
v. hid (hĭd), hid·den (hĭd′n) or hid, hid·ing, hides
v.tr.
1. To put or keep out of sight or away from notice: hid the money in a sock.
2. To prevent the disclosure or recognition of; conceal: tried to hide the facts.
3. To cut off from sight; cover up: Clouds hid the stars. See Synonyms at block.
4. To avert (one's gaze), especially in shame or grief.
v.intr.
1. To keep oneself out of sight or notice.
2. To seek refuge or respite: "no place to hide from boredom or anger or loneliness" (Matt Teague).
Phrasal Verbs:
hide behind
To keep from being criticized or caught doing wrong by making use or mention of (something), especially as an excuse: "[She] said she would not hide behind political euphemism when discussing taxes" (William Yardley).
hide out
To be in hiding, as from a pursuer: The gangsters hid out in a remote cabin until it was safe to return to the city.

[Middle English hiden, from Old English hȳdan; see (s)keu- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: hide1, conceal, secrete2, cache, cloak
These verbs mean to keep from the sight or knowledge of others. Hide and conceal are the most general and are often used interchangeably: I used a throw rug to hide (or conceal) the stain on the carpet. I smiled to hide (or conceal) my hurt feelings.
Secrete and cache involve concealment in a place unknown to others; cache often implies storage for later use: The lioness secreted her cubs in the tall grass. The mountain climbers cached their provisions in a cave.
To cloak is to conceal something by masking or disguising it: "On previously cloaked issues, the Soviets have suddenly become forthcoming" (John McLaughlin). See Also Synonyms at block.

hide 2

 (hīd)
n.
The skin of an animal, especially the thick tough skin or pelt of a large animal.
tr.v. hid·ed, hid·ing, hides
To beat severely; flog.
Idiom:
hide nor hair
A trace; a vestige: haven't seen hide nor hair of them since the argument.

[Middle English, from Old English hȳd; see (s)keu- in Indo-European roots.]

hide 3

 (hīd)
n.
An old English measure of land, usually the amount held adequate for one free family and its dependents.

[Middle English, from Old English hīd; see kei- in Indo-European roots.]

hiding

(ˈhaɪdɪŋ)
n
1. the state of concealment (esp in the phrase in hiding)
2. hiding place a place of concealment

hiding

(ˈhaɪdɪŋ)
n
1. informal a flogging; beating
2. be on a hiding to nothing to be bound to fail; to face impossible odds
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hiding - the activity of keeping something secret
activity - any specific behavior; "they avoided all recreational activity"
disguise, camouflage - the act of concealing the identity of something by modifying its appearance; "he is a master of disguise"
mask - activity that tries to conceal something; "no mask could conceal his ignorance"; "they moved in under a mask of friendship"
masking, screening, cover, covering - the act of concealing the existence of something by obstructing the view of it; "the cover concealed their guns from enemy aircraft"
cover - a false identity and background (especially one created for an undercover agent); "her new name and passport are cover for her next assignment"
cover-up - concealment that attempts to prevent something scandalous from becoming public
burying, burial - concealing something under the ground
smoke screen, smokescreen - an action intended to conceal or confuse or obscure; "requesting new powers of surveillance is just a smokescreen to hide their failures"
stealth, stealing - avoiding detection by moving carefully
money laundering - concealing the source of illegally gotten money
2.hiding - the state of being hidden; "he went into hiding"
concealment, privateness, secrecy, privacy - the condition of being concealed or hidden

hiding

noun (Informal) beating, whipping, thrashing, tanning (slang), caning, licking (informal), flogging, spanking, walloping (informal), drubbing, lathering (informal), whaling, larruping (Brit. dialect) He was misquoted as saying that the police deserved a bloody good hiding.

hiding

noun
A punishment dealt with blows or lashes:
Informal: trimming.
Slang: licking.
Translations
إخْتِفاء، إخْتِباءجَلْدَة على القَفا
výpraskúkryt
kløskjul
felur, òaî aî fela sighÿîing, flenging
skrivališče
dayakgizlenmeköteksaklanmasopa

hiding

1 [ˈhaɪdɪŋ]
A. N to be in hidingestar escondido
to go into hidingesconderse (Pol) → pasar a la clandestinidad
B. CPD hiding place Nescondite m, escondrijo m

hiding

2 [ˈhaɪdɪŋ] N (= beating) → paliza f
to give sb a hidingdar una paliza a algn
to be on a hiding to nothingllevar todas las de perder

hiding

[ˈhaɪdɪŋ] n
(= beating) → correction f, raclée f
to give sb a hiding → donner une raclée à qn
to get a good hiding → prendre une bonne raclée
to be on a hiding to nothing (British)être sûr(e) de se ramasser
to be in hiding (= concealed) → se tenir caché(e)
to go into hiding → se cacher
to come out of hiding → sortir de sa cachettehiding place ncachette f

hiding

1
n to be in hidingsich versteckt halten; to go into hidinguntertauchen, sich verstecken; he came out of hidinger tauchte wieder auf, er kam aus seinem Versteck

hiding

2
n
(= beating)Tracht fPrügel; to give somebody a good hidingjdm eine Tracht Prügel geben
(inf: = defeat) → Schlappe f (inf); the team took or got a real hidingdie Mannschaft musste eine schwere Schlappe einstecken (inf); to be on a hiding to nothingkeine Aussicht auf Erfolg haben

hiding

1 [ˈhaɪdɪŋ] n to be in hidingtenersi nascosto/a
to go into hiding → darsi alla macchia

hiding

2 [ˈhaɪdɪŋ] nbotte fpl
to give sb a good hiding (fam) → suonarle a qn

hide1

(haid) past tense hid (hid) : past participle hidden (ˈhidn) verb
to put (a person, thing etc) in a place where it cannot be seen or easily found. I'll hide the children's presents; You hide, and I'll come and look for you; She hid from her father; He tries to hide his feelings.
noun
a small concealed hut etc from which birds etc can be watched, photographed etc.
ˈhidden adjective
(made in such a way as to be) difficult to see or find. a hidden door; a hidden meaning.
hide-and-seek noun
a children's game in which one person searches for other people who have hidden themselves.
ˈhide-out noun
a place where one can hide or is hiding. The police searched for the bandits' hide-out.
ˈhiding noun
He has gone into hiding because he knows the police are looking for him; Is he still in hiding?; The burglar came out of hiding when the police car drove off.
ˈhiding-place noun
a place where a person or thing can be or is hidden. We'll have to find a safe hiding-place for our jewels.

hide2

(haid) noun
the skin of an animal. He makes coats out of animal hides; cow-hide.
ˈhiding noun
a beating on the buttocks (usually of a child as punishment). He got a good hiding.
References in classic literature ?
Where have you been, and what are you hiding behind you?
Sometimes he could not find a hiding place and that confused him.
She was kept there for a few months, then escaped and walked all the way home, nearly two hundred miles, travelling by night and hiding in barns and haystacks by day.
His awakened imagination, deluded by the deceptive light, converted each waving bush, or the fragment of some fallen tree, into human forms, and twenty times he fancied he could distinguish the horrid visages of his lurking foes, peering from their hiding places, in never ceasing watchfulness of the movements of his party.
I find it hovering in the dining-room, skulking in the parlor, hiding in the hall, lying in wait for me on the stairs.
demanded Carr, hiding his agitation in a burst of querulous rage.
A brown beard, not too silken in its texture, fringed his chin, but as yet without completely hiding it; he wore a short mustache, too, and his dark, high-featured countenance looked all the better for these natural ornaments.
Hiding his canoe, still afloat, among these thickets, with its prow seaward, he sat down in the stern, paddle low in hand; and when the ship was gliding by, like a flash he darted out; gained her side; with one backward dash of his foot capsized and sank his canoe; climbed up the chains; and throwing himself at full length upon the deck, grappled a ringbolt there, and swore not to let it go, though hacked in pieces.
The great hatch is scrubbed and placed upon the try-works, completely hiding the pots; every cask is out of sight; all tackles are coiled in unseen nooks; and when by the combined and simultaneous industry of almost the entire ship's company, the whole of this conscientious duty is at last concluded, then the crew themselves proceed to their own ablutions; shift themselves from top to toe; and finally issue to the immaculate deck, fresh and all aglow, as bridegrooms new-leaped from out the daintiest Holland.
These bare places were grown up with dingy, yellow weeds, hiding innumerable tomato cans; innumerable children played upon them, chasing one another here and there, screaming and fighting.