hiding


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hide 1

 (hīd)
v. hid (hĭd), hid·den (hĭd′n) or hid, hid·ing, hides
v.tr.
1. To put or keep out of sight or away from notice: hid the money in a sock.
2. To prevent the disclosure or recognition of; conceal: tried to hide the facts.
3. To cut off from sight; cover up: Clouds hid the stars. See Synonyms at block.
4. To avert (one's gaze), especially in shame or grief.
v.intr.
1. To keep oneself out of sight or notice.
2. To seek refuge or respite: "no place to hide from boredom or anger or loneliness" (Matt Teague).
Phrasal Verbs:
hide behind
To keep from being criticized or caught doing wrong by making use or mention of (something), especially as an excuse: "[She] said she would not hide behind political euphemism when discussing taxes" (William Yardley).
hide out
To be in hiding, as from a pursuer: The gangsters hid out in a remote cabin until it was safe to return to the city.

[Middle English hiden, from Old English hȳdan; see (s)keu- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: hide1, conceal, secrete2, cache, cloak
These verbs mean to keep from the sight or knowledge of others. Hide and conceal are the most general and are often used interchangeably: I used a throw rug to hide (or conceal) the stain on the carpet. I smiled to hide (or conceal) my hurt feelings.
Secrete and cache involve concealment in a place unknown to others; cache often implies storage for later use: The lioness secreted her cubs in the tall grass. The mountain climbers cached their provisions in a cave.
To cloak is to conceal something by masking or disguising it: "On previously cloaked issues, the Soviets have suddenly become forthcoming" (John McLaughlin). See Also Synonyms at block.

hide 2

 (hīd)
n.
The skin of an animal, especially the thick tough skin or pelt of a large animal.
tr.v. hid·ed, hid·ing, hides
To beat severely; flog.
Idiom:
hide nor hair
A trace; a vestige: haven't seen hide nor hair of them since the argument.

[Middle English, from Old English hȳd; see (s)keu- in Indo-European roots.]

hide 3

 (hīd)
n.
An old English measure of land, usually the amount held adequate for one free family and its dependents.

[Middle English, from Old English hīd; see kei- in Indo-European roots.]

hiding

(ˈhaɪdɪŋ)
n
1. the state of concealment (esp in the phrase in hiding)
2. hiding place a place of concealment

hiding

(ˈhaɪdɪŋ)
n
1. informal a flogging; beating
2. be on a hiding to nothing to be bound to fail; to face impossible odds
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hiding - the activity of keeping something secret
activity - any specific behavior; "they avoided all recreational activity"
disguise, camouflage - the act of concealing the identity of something by modifying its appearance; "he is a master of disguise"
mask - activity that tries to conceal something; "no mask could conceal his ignorance"; "they moved in under a mask of friendship"
masking, screening, cover, covering - the act of concealing the existence of something by obstructing the view of it; "the cover concealed their guns from enemy aircraft"
cover - a false identity and background (especially one created for an undercover agent); "her new name and passport are cover for her next assignment"
cover-up - concealment that attempts to prevent something scandalous from becoming public
burying, burial - concealing something under the ground
smoke screen, smokescreen - an action intended to conceal or confuse or obscure; "requesting new powers of surveillance is just a smokescreen to hide their failures"
stealth, stealing - avoiding detection by moving carefully
money laundering - concealing the source of illegally gotten money
2.hiding - the state of being hidden; "he went into hiding"
concealment, privateness, secrecy, privacy - the condition of being concealed or hidden

hiding

noun (Informal) beating, whipping, thrashing, tanning (slang), caning, licking (informal), flogging, spanking, walloping (informal), drubbing, lathering (informal), whaling, larruping (Brit. dialect) He was misquoted as saying that the police deserved a bloody good hiding.

hiding

noun
A punishment dealt with blows or lashes:
Informal: trimming.
Slang: licking.
Translations
إخْتِفاء، إخْتِباءجَلْدَة على القَفا
výpraskúkryt
kløskjul
felur, òaî aî fela sighÿîing, flenging
skrivališče
dayakgizlenmeköteksaklanmasopa

hiding

1 [ˈhaɪdɪŋ]
A. N to be in hidingestar escondido
to go into hidingesconderse (Pol) → pasar a la clandestinidad
B. CPD hiding place Nescondite m, escondrijo m

hiding

2 [ˈhaɪdɪŋ] N (= beating) → paliza f
to give sb a hidingdar una paliza a algn
to be on a hiding to nothingllevar todas las de perder

hiding

[ˈhaɪdɪŋ] n
(= beating) → correction f, raclée f
to give sb a hiding → donner une raclée à qn
to get a good hiding → prendre une bonne raclée
to be on a hiding to nothing (British)être sûr(e) de se ramasser
to be in hiding (= concealed) → se tenir caché(e)
to go into hiding → se cacher
to come out of hiding → sortir de sa cachettehiding place ncachette f

hiding

1
n to be in hidingsich versteckt halten; to go into hidinguntertauchen, sich verstecken; he came out of hidinger tauchte wieder auf, er kam aus seinem Versteck

hiding

2
n
(= beating)Tracht fPrügel; to give somebody a good hidingjdm eine Tracht Prügel geben
(inf: = defeat) → Schlappe f (inf); the team took or got a real hidingdie Mannschaft musste eine schwere Schlappe einstecken (inf); to be on a hiding to nothingkeine Aussicht auf Erfolg haben

hiding

1 [ˈhaɪdɪŋ] n to be in hidingtenersi nascosto/a
to go into hiding → darsi alla macchia

hiding

2 [ˈhaɪdɪŋ] nbotte fpl
to give sb a good hiding (fam) → suonarle a qn

hide1

(haid) past tense hid (hid) : past participle hidden (ˈhidn) verb
to put (a person, thing etc) in a place where it cannot be seen or easily found. I'll hide the children's presents; You hide, and I'll come and look for you; She hid from her father; He tries to hide his feelings.
noun
a small concealed hut etc from which birds etc can be watched, photographed etc.
ˈhidden adjective
(made in such a way as to be) difficult to see or find. a hidden door; a hidden meaning.
hide-and-seek noun
a children's game in which one person searches for other people who have hidden themselves.
ˈhide-out noun
a place where one can hide or is hiding. The police searched for the bandits' hide-out.
ˈhiding noun
He has gone into hiding because he knows the police are looking for him; Is he still in hiding?; The burglar came out of hiding when the police car drove off.
ˈhiding-place noun
a place where a person or thing can be or is hidden. We'll have to find a safe hiding-place for our jewels.

hide2

(haid) noun
the skin of an animal. He makes coats out of animal hides; cow-hide.
ˈhiding noun
a beating on the buttocks (usually of a child as punishment). He got a good hiding.
References in classic literature ?
Tell Him Who Speaks for Luata," he said, "that Fosh-bal-soj we could not find; but that in returning we found this creature within the temple, hiding.
The gale that was blowing was, he believed, the cause of the delay in getting the Kincaid under way, and if it continued to blow until night then the chances were all in his favour, for he knew that there was little likelihood of the ape-man attempting to navigate the tortuous channel of the Ugambi while darkness lay upon the surface of the water, hiding the many bars and the numerous small islands which are scattered over the expanse of the river's mouth.
There was no evidence that another had discovered the forgotten wealth since last the ape-man had visited its hiding place.
Here we lay in hiding all day, and on the following night, swept on by a flood tide and a fresh wind, we crossed San Pablo Bay in two hours and ran up Petaluma Creek.
While Sergeant Cuff still left me free, I had to choose--and at once-- between destroying the nightgown, or hiding it in some safe place, at some safe distance from the house.
So he clothed himself, hiding his nakedness, and, leaving Galazi, descended to that kraal where the old woman had dwelt, and there gave it out that he was a young man, a chief's son from a far place, who sought a wife.
While we were eating, the dervish happened to mention that in a spot only a little way off from where we were sitting, there was hidden a treasure so great that if my eighty camels were loaded till they could carry no more, the hiding place would seem as full as if it had never been touched.
People were hiding in trenches and cellars, and many of the survivors had made off towards Woking village and Send.
Sir Nathaniel realised that Adam was right; the White Worm had no supernatural powers and could not harm them until she discovered their hiding place.
The visitor's daughter was already smoothing down her dress with an inquiring look at her mother, when suddenly from the next room were heard the footsteps of boys and girls running to the door and the noise of a chair falling over, and a girl of thirteen, hiding something in the folds of her short muslin frock, darted in and stopped short in the middle of the room.
I searched the chambers carefully and waited in hiding for the return of the slave, Turan, if he were temporarily away; but he came not.