hierophant


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hi·er·o·phant

 (hī′ər-ə-fănt′, hī′rə-, hī-ĕr′ə-fənt)
n.
1. An ancient Greek priest who interpreted sacred mysteries, especially the priest of the Eleusinian mysteries.
2. An interpreter of sacred mysteries or arcane knowledge.
3. One who explains or makes a commentary.

[Late Latin hierophanta, from Greek hierophantēs : hieros, holy; see eis- in Indo-European roots + -phantēs, one who shows (from phainein, phan-, to show; see bhā- in Indo-European roots).]

hi′er·o·phan′tic adj.

hierophant

(ˈhaɪərəˌfænt)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Greece) an official high priest of religious mysteries, esp those of Eleusis
2. a person who interprets and explains esoteric mysteries
[C17: from Late Latin hierophanta, from Greek hierophantēs, from hiero- + phainein to reveal]
ˌhieroˈphantic adj
ˌhieroˈphantically adv

hi•er•o•phant

(ˈhaɪ ər əˌfænt, ˈhaɪ rə-, haɪˈɛr ə fənt)

n.
1. (in the ancient world) the chief priest of a mystery cult, esp. of the Eleusinian mysteries.
2. any interpreter of sacred mysteries or esoteric principles; mystagogue.
[1670–80; < Late Latin hierophanta < Greek hierophántēs=hiero- hiero- + -phántēs, derivative of phaínein to show, make known]
hi`er•o•phan′tic, adj.
hi`er•o•phan′ti•cal•ly, adv.
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References in classic literature ?
The hierophant of the sun-god made an effort to climb back on his pedestal.
adventure in the bulrushes the Egyptian hierophants of seven centuries
TX: Hierophant Publishing, 2011) many physicists believe that an additional ad hoc process called "decoherence" that has nothing to do with consciousness should be included in quantum physics resulting in superpositions suddenly or very quickly reducing to single realities on ridiculously short time scales.
The hierophant did not act as a god but transformed into the god itself (Subirats, 2012, p.
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Like Apuleius's revelation of his role as the narrator and main character in the narrative which leads to his initiation into the mysteries of Isis and his understanding of destiny, Hieronimo's, declaration as the author-surrogate and main character is directly related to his role as the hierophant who enacts destiny.
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Any spectacle that follows a period of extreme and terrifying sensory deprivation is bound to be perceived as outstanding and, indeed, as liberating, but that must have been especially true regarding light, which featured prominently in the secret ceremony and apparently accompanied the appearance of the hierophant to the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] in a truly epiphany-like manner.