high life


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high·life

or high life  (hī′līf′)
n.
1. Informal An extravagant or luxurious style of living.
2. Popular West African dance music that combines African rhythms and Western-style pop melodies.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.high life - excessive spending
waste, wastefulness, dissipation - useless or profitless activity; using or expending or consuming thoughtlessly or carelessly; "if the effort brings no compensating gain it is a waste"; "mindless dissipation of natural resources"
Translations

high life

n the high lifela vita dell'alta società or del bel mondo
References in classic literature ?
Let those of high life, therefore, no longer despise the ignorance of their inferiors; nor the vulgar any longer rail at the vices of their betters.
There are scenes of all sorts; some dreadful combats, some grand and lofty horse-riding, some scenes of high life, and some of very middling indeed; some love-making for the sentimental, and some light comic business; the whole accompanied by appropriate scenery and brilliantly illuminated with the Author's own candles.
This was how the matrons in high life had got over the difficulty of meeting Mrs.
WE have hitherto had so much to relate of a gloomy and disastrous nature, that it is with a feeling of momentary relief we turn to something of a more pleasing complexion, and record the first, and indeed only nuptials in high life that took place in the infant settlement of Astoria.
mean, for me: of course the place was all right and agreeable enough for Sandy, for she had been used to high life all her days.
People in high life have all the luxuries to themselves-- among others, the luxury of indulging their feelings.
High life doesn't seem to agree with my constitution.
She was a devoted Catholic, and was perhaps quite a model sort of a Christian as Christians went then, in high life.
I asked leave, however, to look it over in my turn, and at the very first page I opened I found that the editor had enriched his small stock of news by drawing upon our family affairs, and had published my sister's marriage engagement, among his other announcements, copied from the London papers, of Marriages in High Life.
He's so wrapped up in high life, that the least allusion to business or worldly matters--like that woman just now, for instance-- quite distracts him; but, as I often say, I think his disappointment a great thing for him, because if he hadn't been disappointed he couldn't have written about blighted hopes and all that; and the fact is, if it hadn't happened as it has, I don't believe his genius would ever have come out at all.
So they visit their richer cousins, and get into debt when they can, and live but shabbily when they can't, and find--the women no husbands, and the men no wives--and ride in borrowed carriages, and sit at feasts that are never of their own making, and so go through high life.
A day or two afterward found the active and judicious editor examining, with blue eyes that seemed to grow rounder and rounder, the second instalment of Mr Finn's tale of mysteries in high life.