high time


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time

 (tīm)
n.
1.
a. A nonspatial continuum in which events occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future.
b. An interval separating two points on this continuum; a duration: a long time since the last war; passed the time reading.
c. A number, as of years, days, or minutes, representing such an interval: ran the course in a time just under four minutes.
d. A similar number representing a specific point on this continuum, reckoned in hours and minutes: checked her watch and recorded the time, 6:17 am.
e. A system by which such intervals are measured or such numbers are reckoned: solar time.
2.
a. often times An interval, especially a span of years, marked by similar events, conditions, or phenomena; an era: hard times; a time of troubles.
b. times The present with respect to prevailing conditions and trends: You must change with the times.
3. A suitable or opportune moment or season: a time for taking stock of one's life.
4.
a. Periods or a period designated for a given activity: harvest time; time for bed.
b. Periods or a period necessary or available for a given activity: I have no time for golf.
c. A period at one's disposal: Do you have time for a chat?
5. An appointed or fated moment, especially of death or giving birth: He died before his time. Her time is near.
6.
a. One of several instances: knocked three times; addressed Congress for the last time before retirement.
b. times Used to indicate the number of instances by which something is multiplied or divided: This tree is three times taller than that one. My library is many times smaller than hers.
7.
a. One's lifetime.
b. One's period of greatest activity or engagement.
c. A person's experience during a specific period or on a certain occasion: had a good time at the party.
8.
a. A period of military service.
b. A period of apprenticeship.
c. Informal A prison sentence.
9.
a. The customary period of work: hired for full time.
b. The period spent working.
c. The hourly pay rate: earned double time on Sundays.
10. The period during which a radio or television program or commercial is broadcast: "There's television time to buy" (Brad Goldstein).
11. The rate of speed of a measured activity: marching in double time.
12. Music
a. The meter of a musical pattern: three-quarter time.
b. The rate of speed at which a piece of music is played; the tempo.
13. Chiefly British The hour at which a pub closes.
14. Sports A time-out.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or measuring time.
2. Constructed so as to operate at a particular moment: a time release.
3. Payable on a future date or dates.
4. Of or relating to installment buying: time payments.
tr.v. timed, tim·ing, times
1. To set the time for (an event or occasion).
2. To adjust to keep accurate time.
3. To adjust so that a force is applied or an action occurs at the desired time: timed his swing so as to hit the ball squarely.
4. To record the speed or duration of: time a runner.
5. To set or maintain the tempo, speed, or duration of: time a manufacturing process.
6. To speculate based on the anticipated short-term performance of (a market): time the stock market.
Phrasal Verb:
time out
Computers To be canceled if an expected input is not received after a specified time. Used of processes.
Idioms:
against time
With a quickly approaching time limit: worked against time to deliver the manuscript before the deadline.
any time
Used to acknowledge an expression of gratitude.
at one time
1. Simultaneously.
2. At a period or moment in the past.
at the same time
However; nonetheless.
at times
On occasion; sometimes.
behind the times
Out-of-date; old-fashioned.
for the time being
Temporarily.
from time to time
Once in a while; at intervals.
high time
The appropriate or urgent time: It's high time that you started working.
in good time
1. In a reasonable length of time.
2. When or before due.
3. Quickly.
in no time
Almost instantly; immediately.
in time
1. Before a time limit expires.
2. Within an indefinite time; eventually: In time they came to accept the harsh facts.
3. Music
a. In the proper tempo.
b. Played with a meter.
on time
1. According to schedule; punctual or punctually.
2. By paying in installments.
time after time
Again and again; repeatedly.
time and again
Again and again; repeatedly.
time of (one's) life
A highly pleasurable experience: We had the time of our lives at the beach.
time on (one's) hands
An interval with nothing to do.
time was
There was once a time: "Time was when [urban gangs] were part of a ... subculture that inner-city adolescence outgrew" (George F. Will).

[Middle English, from Old English tīma; see dā- in Indo-European roots.]

high time

adv
the latest possible time; a time that is almost too late: it's high time you mended this shelf.
n
Also called: high old time an enjoyable and exciting time

high′ time′


n.
the appropriate time or past the appropriate time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.high time - the latest possible moment; "it is high time you went to work"
time - a suitable moment; "it is time to go"
References in classic literature ?
But come," I imagine some reader complaining, "isn't it high time for something to happen?
It was high time, for I now began to be tortured with thirst.
But this I will say, it is high time he was keeping her out of his books.
It is high time that I should pass from these brief and discursive notes about things in Flatland to the central event of this book, my initiation into the mysteries of Space.
However, I once caught a young male of three years old, and endeavoured, by all marks of tenderness, to make it quiet; but the little imp fell a squalling, and scratching, and biting with such violence, that I was forced to let it go; and it was high time, for a whole troop of old ones came about us at the noise, but finding the cub was safe (for away it ran), and my sorrel nag being by, they durst not venture near us.
Weller that he thought it high time for him to withdraw for the night; requesting him to seek a bed in some adjacent public- house, and return early in the morning, to make arrangements for the removal of his master's wardrobe from the George and Vulture.
It was high time to go, for the pool was getting quite crowded with the birds and animals that had fallen into it: there were a Duck and a Dodo, a Lory and an Eaglet, and several other curious creatures.
I suppose you will stay here in the old place, unless you think of marrying, and it's high time you did," put in Mrs.
Almost a month having elapsed since the liniment cake episode, it was high time for her to get into fresh trouble of some sort, little mistakes, such as absentmindedly emptying a pan of skim milk into a basket of yarn balls in the pantry instead of into the pigs' bucket, and walking clean over the edge of the log bridge into the brook while wrapped in imaginative reverie, not really being worth counting.
Quiet being again restored, a delicious half-hour--so Frank called it, in the course of subsequent conversation with Tim Linkinwater as they were walking home--was spent in conversation, and Tim's watch at length apprising him that it was high time to depart, the ladies were left alone, though not without many offers on the part of Frank to remain until Nicholas arrived, no matter what hour of the night it might be, if, after the late neighbourly irruption, they entertained the least fear of being left to themselves.
The cardinal saw that it was now high time to come to the assistance of Anne.
Everyone with whom the princess had chanced to discuss the matter said the same thing: "Mercy on us, it's high time in our day to cast off all that old-fashioned business.