high-class


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high-class

(hī′klăs′)
adj.
Of superior quality; first-class.

high-class

adj
1. of very good quality; superior: a high-class grocer.
2. (Sociology) belonging to, associated with, or exhibiting the characteristics of an upper social class: a high-class lady; a high-class prostitute.

high′-class′



adj.
of a type superior in quality or degree; first-rate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.high-class - pretentiously elegant; "a high-toned restaurant"
elegant - refined and tasteful in appearance or behavior or style; "elegant handwriting"; "an elegant dark suit"; "she was elegant to her fingertips"; "small churches with elegant white spires"; "an elegant mathematical solution--simple and precise and lucid"

high-class

adjective high-quality, top (slang), choice, select, exclusive, elite, superior, posh (informal, chiefly Brit.), classy (slang), top-flight, upper-class, swish (informal, chiefly Brit.), first-rate, up-market, top-drawer, ritzy (slang), tip-top, high-toned, A1 or A-one (informal) a high-class jeweller's
common, cheap, ordinary, inferior, mediocre, run-of-the-mill, cheapo (informal)
Translations

high-class

[ˌhaɪˈklɑːs] ADJ (= of good quality) → de (alta) categoría

high-class

[ˈhaɪˌklɑːs] adj (neighbourhood) → elegante; (hotel) → di prim'ordine; (person) → di gran classe; (food) → raffinato/a

high

(hai) adjective
1. at, from, or reaching up to, a great distance from ground-level, sea-level etc. a high mountain; a high dive; a dive from the high diving-board.
2. having a particular height. This building is about 20 metres high; My horse is fifteen hands high.
3. great; large; considerable. The car was travelling at high speed; He has a high opinion of her work; They charge high prices; high hopes; The child has a high fever/temperature.
4. most important; very important. the high altar in a church; Important criminal trials are held at the High Court; a high official.
5. noble; good. high ideals.
6. (of a wind) strong. The wind is high tonight.
7. (of sounds) at or towards the top of a (musical) range. a high note.
8. (of voices) like a child's voice (rather than like a man's). He still speaks in a high voice.
9. (of food, especially meat) beginning to go bad.
10. having great value. Aces and kings are high cards.
adverb
at, or to, a great distance from ground-level, sea-level etc. The plane was flying high in the sky; He'll rise high in his profession.
ˈhighly adverb
1. very; very much. highly delighted; highly paid; I value the book highly.
2. with approval. He thinks/speaks very highly of you.
ˈhighness noun
1. the state or quality of being high.
2. a title of a prince, princess etc. Your Highness; Her Highness.
ˈhigh-chair noun
a chair with long legs, used by a baby or young child at mealtimes.
ˌhigh-ˈclass adjective
of high quality. This is a high-class hotel.
higher education
education beyond the level of secondary school education, eg at a university.
high fidelity high quality and great accuracy (in the reproduction of sound). See also hi-fi
ˌhigh-ˈhanded adjective
done, acting, without consultation of, or consideration for, other people. a high-handed decision; A new headmaster should try not to be too high-handed.
ˌhigh-ˈhandedly adverb
ˌhigh-ˈhandedness noun
high jump
a sports contest in which people jump over a bar which is raised until no-one can jump over it.
ˈhighlands noun plural
a mountainous part of certain countries, especially (with capital) of Scotland.
ˈhigh-level adjective
involving important people. high-level talks.
ˈhighlight noun
the best or most memorable event, experience, part of something etc. The highlight of our holiday was a trip to a brewery.
verb
to draw particular attention to (a person, thing etc).
ˌhighly-ˈstrung adjective
very nervous; very easily upset or excited.
ˌhigh-ˈminded adjective
having or showing good or noble ideals, principles etc.
ˌhigh-ˈmindedness noun
ˌhigh-ˈpitched adjective
(of sounds, voices etc) high, sharp. a high-pitched, childish voice.
ˌhigh-ˈpowered adjective
(with an engine which is) very powerful. a high-powered motorboat/engine.
ˈhigh-rise adjective
with many storeys. She does not like living in a high-rise flat as the children cannot get out to play easily.
ˈhighroad noun
a main road.
high school
a secondary school. She goes to high school next year.
ˌhigh-ˈspirited adjective
showing high spirits. a high-spirited horse.
high spirits
enthusiasm, cheerfulness and energy. He's in high spirits today.
high street
(with capital when used as a name) the main street of a town etc, usually with shops etc.
high-tech (ˌhai ˈtek) noun
(also hi-tech, ~high technology) the use of advanced machines and equipment in industry.
adjective
(also hi-tech). high-tech industries.
high tide
the time when the tide is farthest up the shore. High tide today is at 15.46; They set sail at high tide.
high treasontreasonhigh water
the time at which the tide or other water (eg a river) is at its highest point.
ˈhighway noun
a road, especially a large or main road.
Highway Code
in Britain, (a booklet containing) a set of official rules for road users.
ˈhighwaymanplural ˈhighwaymen noun
in earlier times, a man usually on horseback, who attacked and robbed people travelling in coaches etc on public roads.
high wirewirehigh and dry
1. (of boats) on the shore; out of the water. The boat was left high and dry of the beach.
2. in difficulties. Her husband has left her high and dry without any money.
high and low
everywhere. I've searched high and low for that book.
high and mighty
behaving as if one thinks one is very important. Don't be so high and mighty – you're just like any one of us.
the high seas
the open seas; far from land.
it is etc high time
something ought to be done or have been done etc by now. It is high time that this job was finished; It's high time someone spanked that child.

see also tall.
References in classic literature ?
And so Jurgis got a glimpse of the high-class criminal world of Chicago.
I seized my hat and, trying not to look at Apollon, who had been all day expecting his month's wages, but in his foolishness was unwilling to be the first to speak about it, I slipped between him and the door and, lumping into a high-class sledge, on which I spent my last half rouble, I drove up in grand style to the Hotel de Paris.
Moriarty supplied him liberally with money, and used him only in one or two very high-class jobs, which no ordinary criminal could have undertaken.
The world had thrown up a new type of gentleman altogether--a gentleman of most ungentlemanly energy, a gentleman in dusty oilskins and motor goggles and a wonderful cap, a stink-making gentleman, a swift, high-class badger, who fled perpetually along high roads from the dust and stink he perpetually made.
Our brilliant but polished conversation, and our high-class tastes, were beyond them.
With his typical face, clean shaven on lip and chin, with a firm mouth, a strong jaw, a steady eye, and two little white fluffs of whiskers, he could never be taken for anything but what he was, a high-class British medical consultant of the age of fifty, or perhaps just a year or two older.
His family of Kwaque, Michael, and Cocky required food and shelter; more costly than that was maintenance of the Ancient Mariner in the high-class hotel; and, in addition, was his six-quart thirst.
Maggie perceived that Pete brought forth all his elegance and all his knowledge of high-class customs for her benefit.
She had lately taken up painting in water-colours, having read in a high-class woman's weekly paper that a great many princesses of the European royal houses were cultivating that art.
Ballmeyer was the best specimen of the high-class "gentleman swindler.
At first glance I saw that she was a high-class vessel, a harmonious creature in the lines of her fine body, in the proportioned tallness of her spars.
Know then that my wife was educated in a high-class school for the daughters of noblemen, and on leaving she danced the shawl dance before the governor and other personages for which she was presented with a gold medal and a certificate of merit.