high-flier


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

high·fli·er

also high-fli·er  (hī′flī′ər)
n.
1. One who rises quickly to a position of wealth or success.
2. A stock that sells at a high valuation.
Translations

high-flier

high-flyer [ˌhaɪˈflaɪəʳ] n (ambitious) → rampante m/f, ambizioso/a; (gifted) → giovane m/f di talento
References in periodicals archive ?
They fear job losses if he is replaced by ambitious BMW high-flier Dr Wolfgang Reitzle.
SHE may be a Hollywood high-flier worth pounds 20million but Gwyneth Paltrow appears to have adopted the fashion of the street.
In addition, the company expects this area to be an absolute high-flier for them and is expecting multibillion-dollar growth over the next several years.
BRITAIN'S bosses don't rate Hague, with one high-flier even saying he wouldn't buy tile grout from the Tory leader.
HIGH-FLIER Greg Gasson loves hanging out in his spare time.
The 41-year-old high-flier was already the first woman in the country to become a Detective Chief Inspector.
Fellow diners at Scott's in Mayfair included Mick Jagger, Gwen Stefani and hubby Gavin Rossdale, actor Kevin Spacey, highstreet high-flier Sir Philip Green, former F1 star Eddie Jordan, legendary Vogue editrix Anna Wintour and, erm, us.
WHEN it comes to action, actress Angelina Jolie is a real high-flier.
Mind you, on the other tables were Mick Jagger, Gwen Stefani, and hubby Gavin Rossdale, actor Kevin Spacey, highstreet high-flier Sir Philip Green, F1 billionaire Bernie Ecclestone, Eddie Jordan, and legendary Vogue editrix Anna Wintour.
Former Tory high-flier Michael Portillo has been lined up to speak at the annual dinner of Cardiff Chamber of Commerce.
PATSY Kensit's a high-flier in the world of soap now.