high-keyed


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high-keyed

adj
1. (General Physics) having a high pitch; shrill
2. US highly strung
3. (Colours) bright in colour
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.high-keyed - (of persons) excitable
excitable - easily excited
References in classic literature ?
Again the professor burst into high-keyed laughter.
The next room is entirely devoted to works by William Orpen; several portraits of members of the Royal Flying Corps attest to Air-Marshal Sir Hugh Trenchard's desire to publicise the Corps, but Adam and Eve at Peronne and Dead Germans in a Trench (both 1918), painted in Orpen's typical high-keyed palette, show him in a different mood.
Those paintings, with their insistent tactility and crisp, high-keyed geometric designs--they broadly referenced the fabric works of Sophie Taeuber-Arp and Blinky Palermo, among others, and were sometimes directly appropriated from specific compositions--presaged the artist's subsequent production.
Many [African-Americans] tend to be high-keyed, animated, confrontational and interpersonal.
His choreography is technically demanding, high-keyed, and sexy.
The exhibition will begin with some of Seurat's early works from 1881-82, and then show the remarkable transformation of his colors and subject matter around 1883, when he started to explore the modern-life subjects, high-keyed colors, and broken brushwork of Impressionism.
It's an arresting, baroque confection of rich colour, lush musical orchestration, high-keyed performances, purple postdubbed dialogue, and huge dollops of unmistakable Canuck fatalism and alienation.
Consider the example of La Ville (The City), 1919, a painting that has long anchored the Philadelphia Museum's collection of early-twentieth-century European art, and which takes pride of place in this exhibition: Nearly ten feet long and eight feet tall, The City renders its titular subject as a Cubist scaffold of high-keyed, flatly painted planes organized into (roughly) three columnar bays--a nod, perhaps, to Robert Delaunay's tripartite city allegory, La Ville de Paris, 1912.
Although the three were not ideally attuned, they brought a gentle whiff of nostalgia to a season of high-keyed dance.

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