high-pitched


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Related to high-pitched: shrill, tones down

high-pitched

(hī′pĭcht′)
adj.
1. High in pitch, as a voice or musical tone.
2. Steeply sloped, as a roof.
3. Marked by or indicating intense emotion: a high-pitched debate.

high-pitched

adj
1. (Music, other) pitched high in volume or tone. See high10
2. (Architecture) (of a roof) having steeply sloping sides
3. (of an argument, style, etc) lofty or intense

high′-pitched′



adj.
1. played or sung at a high pitch.
2. emotionally intense: a high-pitched argument.
[1585–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.high-pitched - used of sounds and voices; high in pitch or frequency
2.high-pitched - set at a sharp or high angle or slant; "a high-pitched roof"
inclined - at an angle to the horizontal or vertical position; "an inclined plane"

high-pitched

adjective piercing, high, sharp, penetrating, shrill, high-frequency, falsetto A woman squealed in a high-pitched voice.

high-pitched

adjective
Elevated in pitch:
Music: acute.
Translations

high-pitched

[ˈhaɪˈpɪtʃt] ADJ [sound, voice] → agudo; [instrument] → de tono agudo, de tono alto

high-pitched

[ˌhaɪˈpɪtʃt] adjacuto/a

high

(hai) adjective
1. at, from, or reaching up to, a great distance from ground-level, sea-level etc. a high mountain; a high dive; a dive from the high diving-board.
2. having a particular height. This building is about 20 metres high; My horse is fifteen hands high.
3. great; large; considerable. The car was travelling at high speed; He has a high opinion of her work; They charge high prices; high hopes; The child has a high fever/temperature.
4. most important; very important. the high altar in a church; Important criminal trials are held at the High Court; a high official.
5. noble; good. high ideals.
6. (of a wind) strong. The wind is high tonight.
7. (of sounds) at or towards the top of a (musical) range. a high note.
8. (of voices) like a child's voice (rather than like a man's). He still speaks in a high voice.
9. (of food, especially meat) beginning to go bad.
10. having great value. Aces and kings are high cards.
adverb
at, or to, a great distance from ground-level, sea-level etc. The plane was flying high in the sky; He'll rise high in his profession.
ˈhighly adverb
1. very; very much. highly delighted; highly paid; I value the book highly.
2. with approval. He thinks/speaks very highly of you.
ˈhighness noun
1. the state or quality of being high.
2. a title of a prince, princess etc. Your Highness; Her Highness.
ˈhigh-chair noun
a chair with long legs, used by a baby or young child at mealtimes.
ˌhigh-ˈclass adjective
of high quality. This is a high-class hotel.
higher education
education beyond the level of secondary school education, eg at a university.
high fidelity high quality and great accuracy (in the reproduction of sound). See also hi-fi
ˌhigh-ˈhanded adjective
done, acting, without consultation of, or consideration for, other people. a high-handed decision; A new headmaster should try not to be too high-handed.
ˌhigh-ˈhandedly adverb
ˌhigh-ˈhandedness noun
high jump
a sports contest in which people jump over a bar which is raised until no-one can jump over it.
ˈhighlands noun plural
a mountainous part of certain countries, especially (with capital) of Scotland.
ˈhigh-level adjective
involving important people. high-level talks.
ˈhighlight noun
the best or most memorable event, experience, part of something etc. The highlight of our holiday was a trip to a brewery.
verb
to draw particular attention to (a person, thing etc).
ˌhighly-ˈstrung adjective
very nervous; very easily upset or excited.
ˌhigh-ˈminded adjective
having or showing good or noble ideals, principles etc.
ˌhigh-ˈmindedness noun
ˌhigh-ˈpitched adjective
(of sounds, voices etc) high, sharp. a high-pitched, childish voice.
ˌhigh-ˈpowered adjective
(with an engine which is) very powerful. a high-powered motorboat/engine.
ˈhigh-rise adjective
with many storeys. She does not like living in a high-rise flat as the children cannot get out to play easily.
ˈhighroad noun
a main road.
high school
a secondary school. She goes to high school next year.
ˌhigh-ˈspirited adjective
showing high spirits. a high-spirited horse.
high spirits
enthusiasm, cheerfulness and energy. He's in high spirits today.
high street
(with capital when used as a name) the main street of a town etc, usually with shops etc.
high-tech (ˌhai ˈtek) noun
(also hi-tech, ~high technology) the use of advanced machines and equipment in industry.
adjective
(also hi-tech). high-tech industries.
high tide
the time when the tide is farthest up the shore. High tide today is at 15.46; They set sail at high tide.
high treasontreasonhigh water
the time at which the tide or other water (eg a river) is at its highest point.
ˈhighway noun
a road, especially a large or main road.
Highway Code
in Britain, (a booklet containing) a set of official rules for road users.
ˈhighwaymanplural ˈhighwaymen noun
in earlier times, a man usually on horseback, who attacked and robbed people travelling in coaches etc on public roads.
high wirewirehigh and dry
1. (of boats) on the shore; out of the water. The boat was left high and dry of the beach.
2. in difficulties. Her husband has left her high and dry without any money.
high and low
everywhere. I've searched high and low for that book.
high and mighty
behaving as if one thinks one is very important. Don't be so high and mighty – you're just like any one of us.
the high seas
the open seas; far from land.
it is etc high time
something ought to be done or have been done etc by now. It is high time that this job was finished; It's high time someone spanked that child.

see also tall.
References in classic literature ?
On his back he wears a spotted lynx-pelt, and he delights in high-pitched songs in a soft meadow where crocuses and sweet-smelling hyacinths bloom at random in the grass.
Yes, as you see, your tender spouse, as devoted as the first year after marriage, burned with impatience to see you," he said in his deliberate, high-pitched voice, and in that tone which he almost always took with her, a tone of jeering at anyone who should say in earnest what he said.
The grass houses seemed lifeless, but at last, from one of them, came a challenge in the querulous, high-pitched tones of age:
Before this remonstrance was finished, Maggie was already out of hearing, making her way toward the great attic that run under the old high-pitched roof, shaking the water from her black locks as she ran, like a Skye terrier escaped from his bath.
The blue smoke of wood fires spread in a thin mist above the high-pitched roofs of houses that had glistening walls of woven reeds, and all round them rough wooden pillars under the sloping eaves.
a high-pitched voice shouted, and a seven-year-old boy in a black sheepskin coat, new white felt boots, and a warm cap, ran hurriedly out of the house into the yard.
As against the purely negative action of the scientific spirit, the high-pitched Grey, the theistic Elsmere, the "ritualistic priest," the quaint Methodist Fleming, both so admirably sketched, present [69] perhaps no unconquerable differences.
He was no gentle lamb, and the part of second fiddle would never do for the high-pitched dominance of his nature.
Also, in the moments when he was shoved away and was springing back to the attack, he yelped in high-pitched puppy hysteria.
As someone who hears his wife most hours of the day say to our dozy, ageing labrador in high-pitched tones: "Who's a goody-woody boy, den?
CRAIG SIBBALD reckons Blair Alston will strike a chord with St Johnstone this season - but plans to wind up his old pal about his high-pitched voice.
Dog calls that were long and high-pitched were seen by humans to reveal fear while long low-pitched calls were viewed as aggressive.

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