high-water mark


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high-water mark

n.
1. A mark indicating the highest level a body of water reaches.
2. The highest point, as of achievement; the apex.

high-water mark

n
1. (Physical Geography)
a. the level reached by sea water at high tide or by other stretches of water in flood
b. the mark indicating this level
2. the highest point

high′-wa′ter mark`


n.
1. a mark showing the highest level reached by a body of water.
2. the highest point of anything; acme.
[1545–55]

high-water mark

Properly, a mark left on a beach by wave wash at the preceding high water. It does not necessarily correspond to the high-water line. Because it can be determined by simple observation, it is frequently used in place of the high-water line, which can be determined only by a survey. When so used, it is called the high-water line.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.high-water mark - a line marking the highest level reached
watermark, water line - a line marking the level reached by a body of water
Translations

high-water mark

[ˌhaɪˈwɔːtəmɑːk] N
1. (lit) → línea f de la pleamar
2. (fig) → punto m culminante
References in classic literature ?
Her spirits were always at high-water mark, her tongue always going - singing, laughing, and plaguing everybody who would not do the same.
The place was entirely land-locked, buried in woods, the trees coming right down to high-water mark, the shores mostly flat, and the hilltops standing round at a distance in a sort of amphitheatre, one here, one there.
For a day or two the place looked so like an overflowed Arkansas town, because of its currentless waters laving the very doorsteps of all the houses, and the cluster of boats made fast under the windows, or skimming in and out of the alleys and by-ways, that I could not get rid of the impression that there was nothing the matter here but a spring freshet, and that the river would fall in a few weeks and leave a dirty high-water mark on the houses, and the streets full of mud and rubbish.
The atoll of Hikueru lay low on the water, a circle of pounded coral sand a hundred yards wide, twenty miles in circumference, and from three to five feet above high-water mark.
It was most curious to observe, as far as the eye could range, how level and truly horizontal the line on the mountain side was, at which trees ceased to grow: it precisely resembled the high-water mark of drift-weed on a sea-beach.
To-morrow they will have receded from this high-water mark.
Slimy gaps and causeways, winding among old wooden piles, with a sickly substance clinging to the latter, like green hair, and the rags of last year's handbills offering rewards for drowned men fluttering above high-water mark, led down through the ooze and slush to the ebb-tide.
Yet there stands that fact unrepeated, a high-water mark in military history.
I believe that any man's life will be filled with constant, unexpected encouragements of this kind if he makes up his mind to do his level best each day of his life--that is, tries to make each day reach as nearly as possible the high-water mark of pure, unselfish, useful living.
We had stowed our new vessel as secure as we could, bringing her up into the creek, where, as I said in the beginning, I landed my rafts from the ship; and hauling her up to the shore at high-water mark, I made my man Friday dig a little dock, just big enough to hold her, and just deep enough to give her water enough to float in; and then, when the tide was out, we made a strong dam across the end of it, to keep the water out; and so she lay, dry as to the tide from the sea: and to keep the rain off we laid a great many boughs of trees, so thick that she was as well thatched as a house; and thus we waited for the months of November and December, in which I designed to make my adventure.
Winner of ForeWord's quarterly contest for debut fiction authors, Nicole Dixon's High-Water Mark takes on Alice Munro territory -- not just in the geographical setting of Canada, but also in the thematic sense of secrets rattling around like something loose on a car.
The 1950s were the golden age of western television and the high-water mark of single-action revolvers.