highest


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Related to highest: Highest mountain in the world

high

 (hī)
adj. high·er, high·est
1.
a. Having a relatively great elevation; extending far upward: a high mountain; a high tower.
b. Extending a specified distance upward: a cabinet ten feet high.
2. Far or farther from a reference point: was too high in the offensive zone to take a shot.
3.
a. Being at or near the peak or culminating stage: the high tourist season; high summer.
b. Advanced in development or complexity: high forms of animal life; higher mathematics.
c. Far removed in time; remote: high antiquity.
4.
a. Slightly spoiled or tainted; gamy. Used of meat.
b. Having a bad smell; malodorous.
5.
a. Having a pitch corresponding to a relatively large number of sound-wave cycles per second: the high tones of a flute.
b. Raised in pitch; not soft or hushed: a high voice.
6. Situated relatively far from the equator: a high latitude.
7.
a. Of great importance: set a high priority on funding the housing program.
b. Eminent in rank or status: a high official.
c. Serious; grave: high crimes and misdemeanors.
d. Constituting a climax; crucial: The chase scene is the high point of the film.
e. Characterized by lofty or stirring events or themes: high adventure; high drama.
8. Lofty or exalted in quality or character: a person of high morals.
9.
a. Greater than usual or expected, as in quantity, magnitude, cost, or degree: "A high price has to be paid for the happy marriage with the four healthy children" (Doris Lessing).
b. Favorable: He has a high opinion of himself.
10. Of great force or violence: high winds.
11.
a. Informal Excited or euphoric: high spirits.
b. Slang Intoxicated by alcohol or a drug, such as cocaine or marijuana.
12. Luxurious; extravagant: high living.
13. Linguistics Of or relating to vowels produced with part of the tongue close to the palate, as in the vowel of tree.
14. Of, relating to, or being the gear configuration or setting, as in an automotive transmission, that produces the greatest vehicular speed with respect to engine speed.
adv. higher, highest
1. At, in, or to a lofty position, level, or degree: saw a plane high in the sky; prices that had gone too high.
2. In an extravagant or luxurious way: made a fortune and lived high.
n.
1. A lofty place or region.
2. A high level or degree: Summer temperatures reached an all-time high.
3. The high gear configuration of a transmission.
4. A center of high atmospheric pressure; an anticyclone.
5.
a. Informal An excited or euphoric condition: The team was on a high after winning in overtime.
b. Slang An intoxicated or euphoric condition induced by alcohol or a drug.
Idioms:
high and dry
1. In a position of helplessness; stranded: went off and left me high and dry.
2. Nautical Out of water. Used of a ship, for example.
high and low
Here and there; everywhere: searched high and low for the keys.
on high
1. High in the sky.
2. In heaven.
3. In a position of authority.

[Middle English, from Old English hēah.]

high′ly adv.

highest

  • top note - The highest in a piece of music or in a singer's vocal range.
  • paramount, tantamount - Paramount means "primary, top," and tantamount means "equivalent to, same as"; paramount first meant "highest in jurisdiction."
  • prime - Unusual since it can have virtually opposite meanings: "preliminary, basic" or "lowest"—as well as "finest" and "highest."
  • supreme - Ultimately from Latin supra, "above," which begat supremus, "highest."
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

highest

adjective
1. Of, being, located at, or forming the top:
2. Preeminent in rank or position:
Translations

highest

[ˈhaɪɪst]
A. ADJ SUPERL of highel/la más alto/a
he was a man of the highest principlesera un hombre de los más altos principios
the highest common factor (Math) → el máximo común denominador
B. ADV SUPERL of high the highest scoring playerel máximo anotador
Britain's highest paid company directorel director de empresa mejor pagado de Gran Bretaña
References in classic literature ?
In fact, they knew nothing of any of their neighbors; their lodgers were all people of the highest distinction, they assured Edna.
You have all the manifestations of a soft and rich treble; I can, by especial aid, carry a full tenor to the highest letter; but we lack counter and bass
His duties all performed, --the highest prosperity attained,--his race and future generations fixed on a stable basis, and with a stately roof to shelter them for centuries to come,--what other upward step remained for this good man to take, save the final step from earth to the golden gate of heaven
Hester Prynne went one day to the mansion of Governor Bellingham, with a pair of gloves which she had fringed and embroidered to his order, and which were to be worn on some great occasion of state; for, though the chances of a popular election had caused this former ruler to descend a step or two from the highest rank, he still held an honourable and influential place among the colonial magistracy.
The schoolroom piano broke into all gruesome fancies; and when that failed there were confabulations in corners, with a sequel of one of them going out in the highest spirits in order to "come in" as something new.
And about this harpooneer, whom I have not yet seen, you persist in telling me the most mystifying and exasperating stories, tending to beget in me an uncomfortable feeling towards the man whom you design for my bedfellow --a sort of connexion, landlord, which is an intimate and confidential one in the highest degree.
For young whales, in the highest health, and swelling with noble aspirations, prematurely cut off in the warm flush and May of life, with all their panting lard about them; even these brawny, buoyant heroes do sometimes sink.
A note signed by him was equal to a job any time at the packing houses; and also he employed a good many men himself, and worked them only eight hours a day, and paid them the highest wages.
Because they will bring the highest sum of any,--that's why.
When I was let out the next morning, I proceeded to finish my errand, and, having put on my mended show, joined a huckleberry party, who were impatient to put themselves under my conduct; and in half an hour--for the horse was soon tackled--was in the midst of a huckleberry field, on one of our highest hills, two miles off, and then the State was nowhere to be seen.
The highest that we can attain to is not Knowledge, but Sympathy with Intelligence.
However, I had read "Tom Jones," and "Rod- erick Random," and other books of that kind, and knew that the highest and first ladies and gentlemen in England had remained little or no cleaner in their talk, and in the morals and conduct which such talk implies, clear up to a hundred years ago; in fact clear into our own nineteenth century -- in which century, broadly speaking, the earliest samples of the real lady and real gentleman discoverable in English history -- or in European history, for that matter -- may be said to have made their appearance.