hirer


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

hire

 (hīr)
v. hired, hir·ing, hires
v.tr.
1.
a. To engage the services of (a person) for a fee; employ: hired a new clerk.
b. To engage the temporary use of for a fee; rent: hire a car for the day.
2. To grant the services of or the temporary use of for a fee: hired himself out as a cook; hired out the cottage for the summer.
v.intr.
To obtain work: She hired on as a deck hand. He hired out as a photographer.
n.
1.
a. The act of hiring.
b. The condition or fact of being hired.
2.
a. Payment for services; wages.
b. Payment for the use of something.
3. Informal One who is hired: two new hires in the sales department.

[Middle English hiren, from Old English hȳrian.]

hir′a·ble, hire′a·ble adj.
hir′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hirer - a person responsible for hiring workers; "the boss hired three more men for the new job"
employer - a person or firm that employs workers
guvnor - (British slang) boss
old man - (slang) boss

hirer

noun
One that employs persons for wages:
Translations
مُسْتأجِر
nájemce
lejer
leigutaki, leigjandi; vinnuveitandi
kira ile tutankiracıkiralayan

hire

(ˈhaiə) verb
1. (often with from) to get the use of by paying money. He's hiring a car (from us) for the week.
2. (often with out) to give (someone) the use of in exchange for money. Will you hire me your boat for the week-end?; Does this firm hire out cars?
3. (especially American) to employ (a workman etc). They have hired a team of labourers to dig the road.
noun
(money paid for) hiring. Is this hall for hire?; How much is the hire of the hall?; We don't own this crane – it's on hire.
ˈhirer noun
ˌhire-ˈpurchase noun
(also abbreviated to HP (eitʃˈpiː) ) a way of buying an article by paying the price in several weekly or monthly parts. I got this television on hire-purchase; (also adjective) a hire-purchase agreement.
References in classic literature ?
The contrast well marked the difference between being fetched by a thriving farmer and conveying oneself whither no hirer waited one's coming.
Tappings and clankings and strange rhythmic creakings awoke as the intrepid hirer pedalled out into the country.
When the hirer returned, a heated pedestrian, Grubb would ignore all verbal complaints, and examine the machine gravely.
It was often hard work, but nevertheless this hiring was a fairly steady source of profit, until one day all the panes in the window and door were broken and the stock on sale in the window greatly damaged and disordered bv two over-critical hirers with no sense of rhetorical irrelevance.
MD of POINTSoftware Gillian Frary said: "Our research showed that millions of pounds are lost every year in the UK vehicle rental market alone - without even taking into account the full supply chain - because vehicle suppliers are unable to recharge damage caused by the hirer or identify where damage has occurred.
The continuity of the qualifying period can be broken, for example, if workers start a new assignment with a new hirer or a substantively different role with the same hirer, or if there is a break of six weeks between assignments with the same hirer.
Temporary work agencies, hirers and agency workers will be affected by the regulations if a tripartite relationship, where an agency supplies workers to a hirer temporarily, and under their supervision and direction.
Regulations amended in 2007 state that an employment business may not supply a temporary worker to a hirer to replace an individual taking part in an official strike or any other official industrial dispute.
RECRUITMENT firm Michael Page has turned from hirer to firer by losing 1,400 staff since last June.
The bike hirer must bring ID, be over 18 and sign a disclaimer.
Don't fall into the trap of being taken in by an over-eager hirer or by the prospect of making an inordinate difference.
The service is easy to access, and the hirer or guru may receive background information via various secured methods of transmission.