hirple

hirple

(ˈhɪrpəl)
vb (intr)
to limp
n
a limping gait
[C15: of unknown origin]

hirple


Past participle: hirpled
Gerund: hirpling

Imperative
hirple
hirple
Present
I hirple
you hirple
he/she/it hirples
we hirple
you hirple
they hirple
Preterite
I hirpled
you hirpled
he/she/it hirpled
we hirpled
you hirpled
they hirpled
Present Continuous
I am hirpling
you are hirpling
he/she/it is hirpling
we are hirpling
you are hirpling
they are hirpling
Present Perfect
I have hirpled
you have hirpled
he/she/it has hirpled
we have hirpled
you have hirpled
they have hirpled
Past Continuous
I was hirpling
you were hirpling
he/she/it was hirpling
we were hirpling
you were hirpling
they were hirpling
Past Perfect
I had hirpled
you had hirpled
he/she/it had hirpled
we had hirpled
you had hirpled
they had hirpled
Future
I will hirple
you will hirple
he/she/it will hirple
we will hirple
you will hirple
they will hirple
Future Perfect
I will have hirpled
you will have hirpled
he/she/it will have hirpled
we will have hirpled
you will have hirpled
they will have hirpled
Future Continuous
I will be hirpling
you will be hirpling
he/she/it will be hirpling
we will be hirpling
you will be hirpling
they will be hirpling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hirpling
you have been hirpling
he/she/it has been hirpling
we have been hirpling
you have been hirpling
they have been hirpling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hirpling
you will have been hirpling
he/she/it will have been hirpling
we will have been hirpling
you will have been hirpling
they will have been hirpling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hirpling
you had been hirpling
he/she/it had been hirpling
we had been hirpling
you had been hirpling
they had been hirpling
Conditional
I would hirple
you would hirple
he/she/it would hirple
we would hirple
you would hirple
they would hirple
Past Conditional
I would have hirpled
you would have hirpled
he/she/it would have hirpled
we would have hirpled
you would have hirpled
they would have hirpled
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Meekings was at least able to hirple to the touchline as Hayes made way on a stretcher to get him down the tunnel and off to Ninewells Hospital.
HIRPLE is a British word meaning "to limp"; CURPLE means hindquarters or buttocks, especially of a horse; CHILVER (British dialect) means "ewe lamb" or "ewe mutton.
First, Parks sent a longrange penalty narrowly wide - then skipper Ally Kellock was forced to hirple off with a knee problem.
Joggers hirple by, dog walkers pad past, a cyclist claims right of way, a cormorant hangs out its wings to dry and a couple hug and peck on a damp bench.
Auden may have coined some of these words from their Latin root, or come across them in sources not read by OED readers, but occasionally it seems undeniable that OED was his inspiration: in 'A Bad Night: A Lexical Exercise', the word hirple, 'to move with a gait between walking and crawling', is to be found in one of OED's citations for hoast, to cough, which occurs later in the poem.
The 'Morritt circular' begins over lush pastureland where a dotterel pretends to hirple as it lures us away from its simple grass-level nest.
Anyway, that buggered my grand entrance to the protest gathering and I had to hirple up the riverside with my stick (I am surprised that they did not take that away ( after all, I might have hurled it across the Tyne and felled old "Two Jags and double chips, please love").
I will hirple in and get a chair put out beside the dug-out so that I can sit there and watch the game.
Incidentally, since I became temporarily crippled, I've noticed that the amount of time the green man flashes is hardly sufficient for anyone who has to hirple to get even half way across a road.
So I go for a general wax and afterwards hirple round the shops with sair legs walking like John Wayne.
So what on earth moved Sir Peter Ustinov, left, to traipse - sorry, hirple - around the globe in Mark Twain's footsteps for the series Planet Ustinov?