hirundine

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hirundine

(hɪˈrʌndɪn; -daɪn)
adj
1. (Animals) of or resembling a swallow
2. (Animals) belonging to the bird family Hirundinidae, which includes swallows and martins
[C19: from Late Latin hirundineus, from Latin hirundō a swallow]
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References in periodicals archive ?
These popular hirundines have a massive journey ahead of them to Africa and so it's no surprise that a few have delayed starting out on their long trek.
ON Monday evening, the air a little warmer and insects hatching from the lagoons, it was wonderful to watch a flock of hirundines at RSPB Conwy: hundreds of Sand Martins, interspersed with a handful of Swallows and an occasional House Martin.
The hirundines will be on their way south later this month, but the swifts have already started their journeys to Africa.
17,18) For example, falcons, hirundines (Hirundinidae), and seabirds have a high aspect ratio (narrow and elongated wings) and high wing loading (high weight for a low surface), whereas vultures, storks (Ciconiidae), and other land-soaring birds have a low aspect ratio (broad and short wings) and low wing loading (Fig 2).
Don Wilson watched hirundines and swifts over Crosby Marine Lake, and a wheatear, presumably a Greenland.
It is barely a week since I was watching swallows hawking low over cold grey water in a biting easterly at Marshside - I felt sorry for the poor hirundines as they struggled to find food.
Just like home, the kite was elusive - but fortunately more marsh harriers, hirundines and a hobby meant there was enough to watch until the black kite made an appearance, flapping up onto a telegraph pole to spread its wings like a cormorant, drenched after yet more heavy rain.
Both birds coincided with a period of heavy cloud and a clear passage of swifts and hirundines.
Garden warbler, lesser whitethroat, pied and spotted flycatchers, dashing whinchats and squadrons of hirundines had all quickened the blood during dawn sorties on preceding days.
The 'migration hot-spot' award this week goes to Hilbre on Sunday (April 17), when woodlark, Lapland bunting, yellow wagtail and little tern were joined by two tree pipit and 35 little gulls during an impressive session, on a day when much of the region struggled to provide passage of anything other than a few hirundines.
The sand martin is our smallest and most easily overlooked hirundine.