hoarding


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hoard·ing

 (hôr′dĭng)
n.
1. A temporary wooden fence around a building or structure under construction or repair.
2. often hoardings An overhanging wooden structure temporarily mounted atop the walls of a fortification to aid in repelling attackers.
3. Chiefly British A billboard.

[Obsolete hoard, hourd, from French dialectal hourd, fence, scaffold, hurdle, from Old French, of Germanic origin.]

hoarding

(ˈhɔːdɪŋ)
n
1. (Marketing) a large board used for displaying advertising posters, as by a road. Also called (esp US and Canadian): billboard
2. (Building) a temporary wooden fence erected round a building or demolition site
[C19: from C15 hoard fence, from Old French hourd palisade, of Germanic origin, related to Gothic haurds, Old Norse hurth door]

hoarding

billboard
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hoarding - large outdoor signboardhoarding - large outdoor signboard    
signboard, sign - structure displaying a board on which advertisements can be posted; "the highway was lined with signboards"
Translations
حاجِز حَوْل مَبْنىلَوْح كَبير للإعلانات
ohradaplakátovací stěna
plankeværkreklametavle
deszkakerítésfalragasztábla
auglÿsingaskiltitimburòil
skelbimų lentatvora
afišu dēlis
stena na plagáty

hoarding

1 [ˈhɔːdɪŋ] N (= fence) → valla f; (for advertisements) → valla f publicitaria

hoarding

2 [ˈhɔːdɪŋ] N (= act) → acumulación f, retención f

hoarding

[ˈhɔːrdɪŋ] n
(British) (for advertisements)panneau m d'affichage, panneau m publicitaire

hoarding

1
n (of food etc)Hamstern nt; (of capital)Anhäufen nt, → Anhäufung f

hoarding

2
n (Brit: = fence, board) → Bretterzaun m; (at building sites also) → Bauzaun m; (advertising) hoardingPlakatwand f

hoarding

[ˈhɔːdɪŋ] n (Brit) (for advertisements) → tabellone m or riquadro per affissioni; (wooden fence) → staccionata, palizzata

hoarding

(ˈhoːdiŋ) noun
1. a temporary fence of boards, eg round a place where a building is being knocked down or built.
2. a usually large wooden board on which advertisements, posters etc are stuck.
References in classic literature ?
It was the fifteenth of January, about nine o'clock in the morning: Bessie was gone down to breakfast; my cousins had not yet been summoned to their mama; Eliza was putting on her bonnet and warm garden-coat to go and feed her poultry, an occupation of which she was fond: and not less so of selling the eggs to the housekeeper and hoarding up the money she thus obtained.
Not that the idea of being robbed presented itself often or strongly to his mind: hoarding was common in country districts in those days; there were old labourers in the parish of Raveloe who were known to have their savings by them, probably inside their flock-beds; but their rustic neighbours, though not all of them as honest as their ancestors in the days of King Alfred, had not imaginations bold enough to lay a plan of burglary.
Lippet; far from it— I am poor, and I have been hoarding my salary for a purpose that lies near my heart; but, be fore that old man should lie one hour in a jail, I would spend the last cent to prevent it.
Here, against a hoarding of decaying timber, he is brought to bay and tumbles down, lying gasping at his pursuer, who stands and gasps at him until the woman comes up.
His was a veritable fever for acquiring and hoarding, in the matter of science.
Then here would be a field that had been ploughed and not sown, and here a field of corn carelessly trampled by beasts, and here a hoarding torn down across the road to make a fire.
I have been hoarding a few cigarettes and if it won't attract those bouncers out there I would like to have one last smoke before I cash in.
It was also equally impossible to obtain the necessary ingredients for our chemical fuel, and, as we had very little left aboard, we determined to step our folding mast and proceed under sail, hoarding our fuel supply for use in emergencies.
In an old house, dismal dark and dusty, which seemed to have withered, like himself, and to have grown yellow and shrivelled in hoarding him from the light of day, as he had in hoarding his money, lived Arthur Gride.
A rough hoarding of boards had been knocked up before the vestry doorway.
After hoarding up, and borrowing, and begging, and selling everything to pay the passage, they had gone out to New York, expecting to find its streets paved with gold; and had found them paved with very hard and very real stones.
The features of the surrounding picture were, a church with hoarding and scaffolding about it, which had been under suppositious repair so long that the means of repair looked a hundred years old, and had themselves fallen into decay; a quantity of washed linen, spread to dry in the sun; a number of houses at odds with one another and grotesquely out of the perpendicular, like rotten pre- Adamite cheeses cut into fantastic shapes and full of mites; and a feverish bewilderment of windows, with their lattice-blinds all hanging askew, and something draggled and dirty dangling out of most of them.