hoarse


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hoarse

 (hôrs)
adj. hoars·er, hoars·est
1. Rough or grating in sound: a hoarse cry.
2. Having or characterized by a husky, grating voice: yelled ourselves hoarse.

[Middle English hos, hors, from Old English hās, *hārs.]

hoarse′ly adv.
hoarse′ness n.

hoarse

(hɔːs)
adj
1. gratingly harsh or raucous in tone
2. low, harsh, and lacking in intensity: a hoarse whisper.
3. having a husky voice, as through illness, shouting, etc
[C14: of Scandinavian origin; related to Old Norse hās, Old Saxon hēs]
ˈhoarsely adv
ˈhoarseness n

hoarse

(hɔrs, hoʊrs)

adj. hoars•er, hoars•est.
1. having a vocal tone characterized by weakness of intensity and excessive breathiness; husky.
2. having a raucous voice.
3. making a harsh, low sound.
[1350–1400; Middle English hors < Old Norse *hārs (assumed variant of hāss); c. Old English hās, Old Saxon hēs, Old High German heis]
hoarse′ly, adv.
hoarse′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.hoarse - deep and harsh sounding as if from shouting or illness or emotion; "gruff voices"; "the dog's gruff barking"; "hoarse cries"; "makes all the instruments sound powerful but husky"- Virgil Thomson
cacophonic, cacophonous - having an unpleasant sound; "as cacophonous as a henyard"- John McCarten

hoarse

hoarse

adjective
1. Low and grating in sound:
2. Disagreeable to the sense of hearing:
Translations
أجَش، خَشِنمبحوحمُصاب بِبَحَّه، أجَش الصَّوْت
chraplavýchraptivýochraptělý
hæs
hás, rámur
kimusšaižusužkimęsužkimimas
aizsmacis
zachrípnutý
hripav

hoarse

[hɔːs] ADJ (hoarser (compar) (hoarsest (superl))) → ronco
to be hoarsetener la voz ronca
in a hoarse voicecon voz ronca
to shout o.s. hoarseenronquecer a fuerza de gritar

hoarse

[ˈhɔːrs] adj [person] → enroué(e); [voice] → rauque; [whisper] → rauque
to shout o.s. hoarse → s'égosiller jusqu'à en perdre la voix

hoarse

adj (+er)heiser; he shouted himself hoarseer schrie sich heiser; you sound rather hoarsedeine Stimme klingt heiser

hoarse

[hɔːs] adj (-r (comp) (-st (superl))) → rauco/a
they shouted themselves hoarse → si sono sgolati a forza di urlare

hoarse

(hoːs) adjective
1. (of voices, shouts etc) rough; harsh. a hoarse cry; His voice sounds hoarse.
2. having a hoarse voice, usually because one has a cold or cough, or because one has been shouting. You sound hoarse – have you a cold?; The spectators shouted themselves hoarse.
ˈhoarseness noun

hoarse

a. ronco-a; áspero-a.

hoarse

adj ronco; to be — estar ronco, tener la voz ronca
References in classic literature ?
But there came a time when during the fever fits she began to talk in a hoarse, broken voice, to play on the coverlet as if on her beloved little piano, and try to sing with a throat so swollen that there was no music left, a time when she did not know the familiar faces around her, but addressed them by wrong names, and called imploringly for her mother.
His breathing was hoarse, and he always had a cough.
My boy, Liberty does not come from colors, they only show party, and all the liberty you can get out of them is, liberty to get drunk at other people's expense, liberty to ride to the poll in a dirty old cab, liberty to abuse any one that does not wear your color, and to shout yourself hoarse at what you only half-understand -- that's your liberty
The one image which the word "Socialist" brought to Jurgis was of poor little Tamoszius Kuszleika, who had called himself one, and would go out with a couple of other men and a soap-box, and shout himself hoarse on a street corner Saturday nights.
Sobs, heavy, hoarse and loud, shook the chair, and great tears fell through his fingers on the floor; just such tears, sir, as you dropped into the coffin where lay your first-born son; such tears, woman, as you shed when you heard the cries of your dying babe.
She came churning along, now, making a deal of noise of one kind or another, and aggravating it every now and then by blowing a hoarse whistle.
Troop after troop of citizens came to serenade Wilson, and require a speech, and shout themselves hoarse over every sentence that fell from his lips--for all his sentences were golden, now, all were marvelous.
Two hoarse whispers delivered the same awful word simultaneously to the brooding night:
You appear to me a little hoarse already, and when you consider what demand of voice and what fatigues tomorrow will bring, I think it would be no more than common prudence to stay at home and take care of yourself tonight.
It struck twelve--I waited till the time-piece had concluded its silver chime, and the clock its hoarse, vibritting stroke, and then I proceeded.
Really, when he opened on me in that unreasonable tone of displeasure after I had scolded Heathcliff till I was hoarse for him, I did not care hardly what they did to each other; especially as I felt that, however the scene closed, we should all be driven asunder for nobody knows how long
Colin listened and heard it, the oddest sound in the world to hear inside a house, a hoarse "caw-caw.