hock


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Related to hock: out of hock

hock 1

 (hŏk)
n.
1.
a. The tarsal joint of the hind leg of certain quadrupeds, such as horses and dogs, corresponding to the human ankle but bending in the opposite direction.
b. A joint in the leg of a domestic fowl similar to the hock of a quadruped.
2. A small cut of meat, especially ham, from the front or hind leg directly above the foot.
tr.v. hocked, hock·ing, hocks
To disable by cutting the tendons of the hock; hamstring.

[Middle English hok, variant (perhaps originally arising in compounds such as hough sineue, hock sinew, Achilles tendon, hamstring, and hokschynes, literally "hock shins," ankles (meaning uncertain)) of hough, heel, hock, from Old English hōh, heel.]

hock 2

 (hŏk)
n. Chiefly British
Rhine wine.

[Short for obsolete Hockamore, alteration of German Hochheimer, from Hochheim, a town of west-central Germany.]

hock 3

 (hŏk) Slang
tr.v. hocked, hock·ing, hocks
To pawn: hock a diamond ring.
n.
1. The state of being pawned: put the diamonds in hock.
2. The state of being in debt: thought we'd never get out of hock.

[Probably from Dutch hok, prison.]

hock

(hɒk)
n
1. (Zoology) the joint at the tarsus of a horse or similar animal, pointing backwards and corresponding to the human ankle
2. (Zoology) the corresponding joint in domestic fowl
vb
(Zoology) another word for hamstring
[C16: short for hockshin, from Old English hōhsinu heel sinew]

hock

(hɒk)
n
1. (Brewing) any of several white wines from the German Rhine
2. (Brewing) (not in technical usage) any dry white wine
[C17: short for obsolete hockamore Hochheimer]

hock

(hɒk)
vb
(tr) to pawn or pledge
n
1. the state of being in pawn (esp in the phrase in hock)
2. in hock
a. in prison
b. in debt
c. in pawn
[C19: from Dutch hok prison, debt]
ˈhocker n

hock1

(hɒk)

n.
1. the joint in the hind leg of a horse, cow, etc., above the fetlock joint, corresponding anatomically to the ankle in humans.
2. a corresponding joint in a fowl.
[1375–1425; variant of dial. hough, Middle English ho(u)gh, appar. back formation from late Middle English hokschyn, etc., Old English hōhsinu hock (literally, heel) sinew]

hock2

(hɒk)

n. Chiefly Brit.
any white Rhine wine.
[1615–25; short for Hockamore, alter. of German Hochheimer <Hochheim, Germany]

hock3

(hɒk)
v.t.
1. to pawn.
n.
2. the state of being deposited or held as security; pawn.
3. the condition of owing; debt.
[1855–60 < Dutch hok kennel, pen, prison]
hock′er, n.

hock


Past participle: hocked
Gerund: hocking

Imperative
hock
hock
Present
I hock
you hock
he/she/it hocks
we hock
you hock
they hock
Preterite
I hocked
you hocked
he/she/it hocked
we hocked
you hocked
they hocked
Present Continuous
I am hocking
you are hocking
he/she/it is hocking
we are hocking
you are hocking
they are hocking
Present Perfect
I have hocked
you have hocked
he/she/it has hocked
we have hocked
you have hocked
they have hocked
Past Continuous
I was hocking
you were hocking
he/she/it was hocking
we were hocking
you were hocking
they were hocking
Past Perfect
I had hocked
you had hocked
he/she/it had hocked
we had hocked
you had hocked
they had hocked
Future
I will hock
you will hock
he/she/it will hock
we will hock
you will hock
they will hock
Future Perfect
I will have hocked
you will have hocked
he/she/it will have hocked
we will have hocked
you will have hocked
they will have hocked
Future Continuous
I will be hocking
you will be hocking
he/she/it will be hocking
we will be hocking
you will be hocking
they will be hocking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hocking
you have been hocking
he/she/it has been hocking
we have been hocking
you have been hocking
they have been hocking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hocking
you will have been hocking
he/she/it will have been hocking
we will have been hocking
you will have been hocking
they will have been hocking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hocking
you had been hocking
he/she/it had been hocking
we had been hocking
you had been hocking
they had been hocking
Conditional
I would hock
you would hock
he/she/it would hock
we would hock
you would hock
they would hock
Past Conditional
I would have hocked
you would have hocked
he/she/it would have hocked
we would have hocked
you would have hocked
they would have hocked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hock - any of several white wines from the Rhine River valley in Germany (`hock' is British usage)
white wine - pale yellowish wine made from white grapes or red grapes with skins removed before fermentation
Riesling - fragrant dry or sweet white wine from the Rhine valley or a similar wine from California
liebfraumilch - a sweetened Rhenish wine (especially one from Hesse in western Germany)
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
2.hock - tarsal joint of the hind leg of hoofed mammals; corresponds to the human ankle
hoofed mammal, ungulate - any of a number of mammals with hooves that are superficially similar but not necessarily closely related taxonomically
hind leg - the back limb of a quadruped
articulatio, joint, articulation - (anatomy) the point of connection between two bones or elements of a skeleton (especially if it allows motion)
Verb1.hock - leave as a guarantee in return for money; "pawn your grandfather's gold watch"
commerce, commercialism, mercantilism - transactions (sales and purchases) having the objective of supplying commodities (goods and services)
consign, charge - give over to another for care or safekeeping; "consign your baggage"
2.hock - disable by cutting the hock
handicap, incapacitate, invalid, disable - injure permanently; "He was disabled in a car accident"

hock

verb
Slang. To give or deposit as a pawn:
Translations
عُرْقوب
hlezno
hase
csánk
hækilbein
gurnas
pätový kĺb

hock

1 [hɒk] N [of animal] → corvejón m

hock

2 [hɒk] N (= wine) → vino m blanco del Rin

hock

3 [hɒk]
A. VT (= pawn) → empeñar
B. N in hock [object] → empeñado; [person] → endeudado

hock

[ˈhɒk] n
(British) (= wine) → vin m du Rhin
[animal] → jarret m
(COOKERY)jarret m
ham hock → jarret de porc
gammon hock → jarret de porc fumé
to be in hock (= owe money) [person] → être endetté(e)
to be in hock to sb → s'endetter auprès de qn
to be in hock to the banks → être endetté(e) auprès des banques
Years ago, he would never have got in hock to the bank → Il y a quelques années, il ne se serait jamais endetté auprès de la banque.
to be in hock (= in pawn shop) [object] → être mis(e) en gage, être mis(e) au clou

hock

1
n (Anat, of animal) → Sprunggelenk nt

hock

2
n (= wine)weißer Rheinwein

hock

3 (inf)
vt (= pawn)versetzen, verpfänden
n in hockverpfändet, versetzt, im Leihhaus; to be in hock to somebodyin jds Schuld stehen

hock

1 [hɒk] n (of animal) (Culin) → garretto

hock

2 [hɒk] n (Brit) (wine) → vino bianco del Reno

hock

3 [hɒk] (fam)
1. n to be in hock (debt) → essere indebitato/a
2. vt (pawn) → impegnare

hock

(hok) noun
a joint on the hind leg of an animal, below the knee. The horse has an injured hock.
References in classic literature ?
Professor Erlin prided himself on his skill in preparing this mild intoxicant, and after supper the large bowl of hock and soda, with scented herbs floating in it and wild strawberries, was placed with solemnity on the round table in the drawing-room.
Bright shone the sun on battlement and tower, and in the blue air overhead a Hock of clattering jackdaws flew around the gilded weather vane and spire.
But it had never occurred to him that he should live in any other than what he would have called an ordinary way, with green glasses for hock, and excellent waiting at table.
I don't know much about the cellars, but there is some cabinet hock, I believe--"
shouted the Lincoln greens; and down their four-and-twenty throats went four-and-twenty imperial pints of such rare old hock, that they smacked their eight-and-forty lips, and winked again.
I can borrow a dime from the barber, an' I got enough junk to hock for a blowout.
The Prince sipped his wine - a cabinet hock of rare vintage - and found it good.
Threadgall at the time, plying her confidentially with a glass of hock.
I have not inquired among my medical acquaintance, whether Turtle, and cold Punch, with Hock, Champagne, and Claret, and all the slight et cetera usually included in an unlimited order for a good dinner - especially when it is left to the liberal construction of my faultless friend, Mr.
This man was as hard-tempered and hard-handed as Samson; he always spoke in a rough, impatient voice, and if I did not move in the stall the moment he wanted me, he would hit me above the hocks with his stable broom or the fork, whichever he might have in his hand.
Now, with all this fine fancy business and rearing, which must be very bad for your hocks, what do you do?
Round full quarters - a thin long tail - large hocks - thin legs, as dry as bars of steel - hoofs hard as marble.