hold forth


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Related to hold forth: in turn, in line with, proceed with, come to terms with

hold 1

 (hōld)
v. held (hĕld), hold·ing, holds
v.tr.
1.
a. To have and keep in one's grasp: held the reins tightly.
b. To aim or direct; point: held a hose on the fire.
c. To keep from falling or moving; support: a nail too small to hold the mirror; hold the horse steady; papers that were held together with staples.
d. To sustain the pressure of: The old bridge can't hold much weight.
2.
a. To keep from departing or getting away: Hold the bus! Hold the dog until I find the leash.
b. To keep in custody: held the suspect for questioning.
c. To retain (one's attention or interest): Televised sports can't hold my interest.
d. To avoid letting out or expelling: The swimmer held her breath while underwater.
3.
a. To be filled by; contain: This drawer holds socks.
b. To be capable of holding: a pitcher that holds a quart. See Synonyms at contain.
c. To have as a chief characteristic or quality: The film holds many surprises.
d. To have in store: Let's see what the future holds.
4.
a. To have and maintain in one's possession: holds a great deal of property.
b. To have as a responsible position or a privilege: held the governorship for six years.
c. To have in recognition of achievement or superiority: holds the record for the one-mile race; holds the respect of her peers.
5.
a. To maintain control over: Thieves held the stolen painting for ransom.
b. To maintain occupation of by force or coercion: Protesters held the embassy for a week.
c. To withstand the efforts or advance of (an opposing team, for example).
d. To maintain in a given condition, situation, or action: The storyteller held the crowd spellbound.
6.
a. To impose control or restraint on; curb: She held her temper.
b. To stop the movement or progress of: Hold the presses!
c. To reserve or keep back from use: Please hold two tickets for us. Hold the relish on that hamburger.
d. To defer the immediate handling of: The receptionist held all calls during the meeting.
7.
a. To own or have title to.
b. To be in possession of, whether legally entitled or not: holds an interest in the company.
c. To bind by a contract.
d. To adjudge or decree: The court held that the defendant was at fault.
e. To make accountable; obligate: He held me to my promise.
8.
a. To keep in the mind or convey as a judgment, conviction, or point of view: holds that this economic program is the only answer to high prices.
b. To assert or affirm, especially formally: This doctrine holds that people are inherently good.
c. To regard in a certain way: I hold you in high esteem.
9.
a. To cause to take place; carry on: held the race in Texas; hold a yard sale.
b. To assemble for and conduct the activity of; convene: held a meeting of the board.
10.
a. To carry or support (the body or a bodily part) in a certain position: Can the baby hold herself up yet? Hold up your leg.
b. To cover (the ears or the nose, for example) especially for protection: held my nose against the stench.
v.intr.
1.
a. To maintain a grasp or grip on something.
b. To stay securely fastened: The chain held.
2.
a. To maintain a desired or accustomed position or condition: hopes the weather will hold.
b. To withstand stress, pressure, or opposition: The defense held. We held firm on the negotiations.
3. To continue in the same direction: The ship held to an easterly course.
4. To be valid, applicable, or true: The observation still holds in cases like this.
5. To halt an intended action. Often used in the imperative.
6. To stop the countdown during a missile or spacecraft launch.
7. Slang To have in one's possession illicit or illegally obtained material or goods, especially narcotics: The suspect was holding.
n.
1.
a. The act or a means of grasping.
b. A manner of grasping an opponent, as in wrestling or aikido: a neck hold; an arm hold.
2. Something that may be grasped or gripped, as for support.
3. A control or adjustor on a television that keeps the screen image in proper position: adjusted the horizontal hold.
4. A telephone service that allows one to temporarily interrupt a call without severing the connection.
5.
a. A bond or force that attaches or restrains, or by which something is affected or dominated: a writer with a strong hold on her readership.
b. Complete control: has a firm hold on the complex issues.
c. Full understanding: has a good hold on physics.
6. Music
a. The sustaining of a note longer than its indicated time value.
b. The symbol designating this pause; a fermata.
7.
a. A direction or indication that something is to be reserved or deferred.
b. A temporary halt, as in a countdown.
8.
a. A prison cell.
b. The state of being in confinement; custody.
9. Archaic A fortified place; a stronghold.
Phrasal Verbs:
hold back
1. To retain in one's possession or control: held back valuable information; held back my tears.
2. To impede the progress of.
3. To restrain oneself: Tell us what happened. Don't hold back.
hold down
1. To limit: Please hold the noise down.
2. To fulfill the duties of (a job): holds down two jobs.
hold forth
To talk at great length.
hold off
1. To keep at a distance; resist: held the creditors off.
2. To stop or delay doing something: Let's hold off until we have more data.
hold on
1. To maintain one's grip; cling.
2. To endure or continue to do something despite difficulty: They held on until fresh supplies arrived.
3. To wait for something wanted or requested.
hold out
1. To present or offer: She held out the possibility that she might run for office.
2. To continue to be in supply or service; last: How long can our food hold out?
3. To continue to resist: The defending garrison held out for a month.
4. To refuse to reach an agreement or insist on certain demands: The union held out for a better raise.
hold over
1. To postpone or delay.
2. To keep in a position or state from an earlier period of time.
3. To continue a term of office past the usual length of time.
4. To prolong the engagement of: The film was held over for weeks.
hold to
To remain loyal or faithful to: She held to her resolutions.
hold up
1. To obstruct or delay.
2. To rob while armed, often at gunpoint.
3. To offer or present as an example: held the essay up as a model for the students.
4. To continue to function without losing force or effectiveness; cope: managed to hold up under the stress.
hold with
To agree with; support: I don't hold with your theories.
Idioms:
get hold of
1. To come into possession of; find: Where can I get hold of a copy?
2. To communicate with, as by telephone: tried to get hold of you but the line was busy.
3. To gain control of. Often used reflexively: You must get hold of yourself!
hold a candle to
To compare favorably with: This film doesn't hold a candle to his previous ones.
hold/keep (one's) end up
To fulfill one's part of an agreement; do one's share.
hold (one's) own
To do reasonably well despite difficulty or criticism.
hold out on (someone)
To withhold something from: Don't hold out on me; start telling the truth.
hold (someone's) feet to the fire
To pressure (someone) to consent to or undertake something.
hold sway
To have a controlling influence; dominate.
hold the bag Informal
1. To be left with empty hands.
2. To be forced to assume total responsibility when it ought to have been shared.
hold the fort Informal
1. To assume responsibility, especially in another's absence.
2. To maintain a secure position.
hold the line
To maintain the existing position or state of affairs: had to hold the line on salary increases.
hold the phone Slang
To stop doing what one is engaged in doing. Often used in the imperative: Hold the phone! Let's end this argument.
hold water
To stand up to critical examination: Your explanation doesn't hold water.
no holds barred
Without limits, regulations, or restraints.
on hold
1. Into a state of temporary interruption without severing a telephone connection: put me on hold for 10 minutes.
2. Informal Into a state of delay or indeterminate suspension: had to put the romance on hold.

[Middle English holden, from Old English healdan.]

hold 2

 (hōld)
n.
The lower interior part of a ship or airplane where cargo is stored.

[Alteration (influenced by hold) of Middle English hole, husk, hull of a ship, from Old English hulu; see kel- in Indo-European roots.]

hold forth

vb (adverb)
1. (intr) to speak for a long time or in public
2. (tr) to offer (an attraction or enticement)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.hold forth - talk at length and formally about a topic; "The speaker dissertated about the social politics in 18th century England"
talk, speak - exchange thoughts; talk with; "We often talk business"; "Actions talk louder than words"
Translations
يُلْقي خطابا، يُعَبِّرُ عن رأيِه
řečnit
prædiketale
láta dæluna ganga
uzun uzun konuşmak

hold1

(həuld) past tense, past participle held (held) verb
1. to have in one's hand(s) or between one's hands. He was holding a knife; Hold that dish with both hands; He held the little boy's hand; He held the mouse by its tail.
2. to have in a part, or between parts, of the body, or between parts of a tool etc. He held the pencil in his teeth; She was holding a pile of books in her arms; Hold the stamp with tweezers.
3. to support or keep from moving, running away, falling etc. What holds that shelf up?; He held the door closed by leaning against it; Hold your hands above your head; Hold his arms so that he can't struggle.
4. to remain in position, fixed etc when under strain. I've tied the two pieces of string together, but I'm not sure the knot will hold; Will the anchor hold in a storm?
5. to keep (a person) in some place or in one's power. The police are holding a man for questioning in connection with the murder; He was held captive.
6. to (be able to) contain. This jug holds two pints; You can't hold water in a handkerchief; This drawer holds all my shirts.
7. to cause to take place. The meeting will be held next week; We'll hold the meeting in the hall.
8. to keep (oneself), or to be, in a particular state or condition. We'll hold ourselves in readiness in case you send for us; She holds herself very erect.
9. to have or be in (a job etc). He held the position of company secretary for five years.
10. to think strongly; to believe; to consider or regard. I hold that this was the right decision; He holds me (to be) responsible for everyone's mistakes; He is held in great respect; He holds certain very odd beliefs.
11. to continue to be valid or apply. Our offer will hold until next week; These rules hold under all circumstances.
12. (with to) to force (a person) to do something he has promised to do. I intend to hold him to his promises.
13. to defend. They held the castle against the enemy.
14. not to be beaten by. The general realized that the soldiers could not hold the enemy for long.
15. to keep (a person's attention). If you can't hold your pupils' attention, you can't be a good teacher.
16. to keep someone in a certain state. Don't hold us in suspense, what was the final decision?
17. to celebrate. The festival is held on 24 June.
18. to be the owner of. He holds shares in this company.
19. (of good weather) to continue. I hope the weather holds until after the school sports.
20. (also hold the line) (of a person who is making a telephone call) to wait. Mr Brown is busy at the moment – will you hold or would you like him to call you back?
21. to continue to sing. Please hold that note for four whole beats.
22. to keep (something). They'll hold your luggage at the station until you collect it.
23. (of the future) to be going to produce. I wonder what the future holds for me?
noun
1. the act of holding. He caught/got/laid/took hold of the rope and pulled; Keep hold of that rope.
2. power; influence. He has a strange hold over that girl.
3. (in wrestling etc) a manner of holding one's opponent. The wrestler invented a new hold.
-holder
a person or thing that holds something. a pen-holder; a ticket-holder (= a person who has a ticket for something).
ˈhold-all noun
a (usually large) bag with a zip for packing clothes etc into.
get hold of
1. to manage to speak to. I've been trying to get hold of you by phone all morning.
2. to get, buy or obtain. I've been trying to get hold of a copy of that book for years.
hold back
1. to refuse to tell someone (something). The police were convinced the man was holding something back.
2. to prevent from happening, being seen etc, with an effort. The little girl succeeded in holding back her tears.
3. to prevent from making progress. I meant to finish cleaning the house but the children have held me back all morning.
hold down
to keep or be allowed to stay in (a job). He is incapable of holding down a job.
hold forth
to talk or give one's opinions, often loudly, at great length. The prime minister held forth for hours on the success of his government.
hold good
to be true or valid; to apply. Does that rule hold good in every case?
hold it
to stop or wait. Hold it! Don't start till I tell you to.
hold off
1. (of weather) to stay away. I hope the rain holds off.
2. to keep off; to fight successfully against. The soldiers managed to hold off the enemy.
hold on
1. (often with to) to keep (a grip on) (something). She held on to me to stop herself slipping; I couldn't hold on any longer, so I let go of the rope.
2. to stop or wait. Hold on – I'm not quite ready yet; The operator asked the caller to hold on while she connected him.
hold out
1. to continue to survive etc until help arrives. The rescue team hoped the men in the boat could hold out till they arrived.
2. to continue to fight against an enemy attack. The soldiers held out for eight days.
3. to be enough to last. Will our supplies hold out till the end of the month?
hold one's own
to be as successful in a fight, argument etc as one's opponent. His opponents tried to prove his arguments wrong but he managed to hold his own.
hold one's tongue
to remain silent or stop talking. There were a lot of things I wanted to say, but I thought I'd better just hold my tongue.
hold up
1. to stop or slow the progress of. I'm sorry I'm late – I got held up at the office.
2. to stop and rob. The bandits held up the stagecoach.
ˈhold-up noun
hold with
to approve of. He doesn't hold with smoking.
References in classic literature ?
Alleyne might talk to her of the stories of old gods and heroes, of gallant deeds and lofty aims, or he might hold forth upon moon and stars, and let his fancy wander over the hidden secrets of the universe, and he would have a rapt listener with flushed cheeks and eloquent eyes, who could repeat after him the very words which had fallen from his lips.
It was knowing to hold forth, in the humble-virtue school of eloquence; but, I assure you I thought at the time, "My good fellow, you are over-doing this
Cruncher, with a most alarming tendency to hold forth as from a pulpit--"and let my words be took down and took to Mrs.
Saving his troublesome sense of having been "low' on one occasion since his return - on which point he began to hold forth to Herbert, the moment my revelation was finished - he had no perception of the possibility of my finding any fault with my good fortune.
I began, by being singularly cheerful and light-hearted; all sorts of half-forgotten things to talk about, came rushing into my mind, and made me hold forth in a most unwonted manner.
Yes, Mother, I'm sure of that," said Meg, listening respectfully to the little lecture, for the best of women will hold forth upon the all absorbing subject of house keeping.
She was so used to hearing Sellers lash the Philistine and hold forth on unappreciated merit that she could hardly believe the miracle when, in answer to a sympathetic bromide on the popular lack of taste in Art, Beverley replied that, as far as he was concerned, the public showed strong good sense.
The other day ashore I heard him hold forth about it to a lot of shipmasters who came in and sat at a table next to mine.