holdfast


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hold·fast

 (hōld′făst′)
n.
1. Any of various devices used to fasten something securely.
2. Biology An organ or structure of attachment, especially the basal, rootlike formation by which certain seaweeds or other algae are attached to a substrate.

holdfast

(ˈhəʊldˌfɑːst)
n
1.
a. the act of gripping strongly
b. such a grip
2. (Mechanical Engineering) any device used to secure an object, such as a hook, clamp, etc
3. (Botany) the organ of attachment of a seaweed or related plant

hold•fast

(ˈhoʊldˌfæst, -ˌfɑst)

n.
1. something used to hold or secure a thing in place.
2. any of several rootlike or suckerlike parts of a plant or fungus serving for attachment.
[1550–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.holdfast - restraint that attaches to something or holds something in placeholdfast - restraint that attaches to something or holds something in place
bellyband - a strap around the belly of a draft animal holding the shafts of a wagon
buckle - fastener that fastens together two ends of a belt or strap; often has loose prong
button - a round fastener sewn to shirts and coats etc to fit through buttonholes
carabiner, karabiner, snap ring - an oblong metal ring with a spring clip; used in mountaineering to attach a rope to a piton or to connect two ropes
catch - a fastener that fastens or locks a door or window
clasp - a fastener (as a buckle or hook) that is used to hold two things together
cleat - a fastener (usually with two projecting horns) around which a rope can be secured
clinch - the flattened part of a nail or bolt or rivet
clip - any of various small fasteners used to hold loose articles together
clothes peg, clothes pin, clothespin - wood or plastic fastener; for holding clothes on a clothesline
corrugated fastener, wiggle nail - a small strip of corrugated steel with sharp points on one side; hammered across wood joints in rough carpentry
cottar, cotter - fastener consisting of a wedge or pin inserted through a slot to hold two other pieces together
cringle, grommet, grummet, loop, eyelet - fastener consisting of a metal ring for lining a small hole to permit the attachment of cords or lines
dowel, dowel pin, joggle - a fastener that is inserted into holes in two adjacent pieces and holds them together
stopping, fillet - fastener consisting of a narrow strip of welded metal used to join steel members
hook and eye - a kind of fastener used on clothing
knot - any of various fastenings formed by looping and tying a rope (or cord) upon itself or to another rope or to another object
lashing - rope that is used for fastening something to something else; "the boats were held together by lashings"
linkup, tie-in, link, tie - a fastener that serves to join or connect; "the walls are held together with metal links placed in the wet mortar during construction"
lock - a fastener fitted to a door or drawer to keep it firmly closed
locker - a fastener that locks or closes
nail - a thin pointed piece of metal that is hammered into materials as a fastener
nut and bolt - a fastener made by screwing a nut onto a threaded bolt
paper fastener - a fastener for holding a sheet of paper in place
pin - a small slender (often pointed) piece of wood or metal used to support or fasten or attach things
constraint, restraint - a device that retards something's motion; "the car did not have proper restraints fitted"
screw - a fastener with a tapered threaded shank and a slotted head
seal - fastener that provides a tight and perfect closure
seal, sealing wax - fastener consisting of a resinous composition that is plastic when warm; used for sealing documents and parcels and letters
slide fastener, zip fastener, zipper, zip - a fastener for locking together two toothed edges by means of a sliding tab
press stud, snap fastener, snap - a fastener used on clothing; fastens with a snapping sound; "children can manage snaps better than buttons"
toggle - a fastener consisting of a peg or pin or crosspiece that is inserted into an eye at the end of a rope or a chain or a cable in order to fasten it to something (as another rope or chain or cable)
toggle bolt - a fastener consisting of a threaded bolt and a hinged spring-loaded toggle; used to fasten objects to hollow walls
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Bear in mind then, that Brag is a good dog, but Holdfast is a better.
Nature as a blueprint for polymer concept: protein fiber-reinforced composites as holdfast of mussels.
Some organisms in the Kokosing River, such as the heptageniid mayflies, are well-adapted to high flow conditions and have adaptations for clinging to substrates, such as dorsoventrally flattened bodies and holdfast organs (Hora 1930).
Charley's initial call for an alternative architectural practice is recalled from the introductory chapter, reminding the reader to holdfast to a critical reflexivity that continues to interrogate the social, political, economic and material production of the city.
I have three precious things which I holdfast and prize.
Red' Unionism and 'Class against Class' in Britain, Canada, and the United States, 1928-1935," Labour/Le Travail 56 (Fall 2005): 9-49; John Manley, "Communism and Canadian Working Class during the Great Depression: The Workers' Unity League, 19301936," PhD thesis, Dalhousie University, 1984; Ian McKay, The Craft Transformed: An Essay on The Carpenters of Halifax, 1885-1985 (Halifax, NS: Holdfast Press, 1985), 89-91.
Kathleen Dean Moore, philosophy professor at Oregon State University, is the co-editor of Moral Ground: Ethical Action for a Planet in Peril and the author of Wild Comfort, Holdfast, Riverwalking, and other books.
The Court was told that the Quran calls upon the Muslims to holdfast to their agreements and the Book makes it sufficiently clear that "no agreement remains equally beneficial to both parties all the time", the petition noted and for that very reason the Quran ordains that every agreement involving financial transaction or marriage be "written in black and white".
Such fruits were tied with nylon fiber to the twigs of guava plants (Psidium guajava) to allow the formation of the holdfast and the emergence of the haustorium.
It is possible that the ability to change color and morphology, and similarity to its holdfast, may increase crypsis effectiveness.