holocaust


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Related to holocaust: Concentration camps, Anne Frank

hol·o·caust

 (hŏl′ə-kôst′, hō′lə-)
n.
1. Great destruction resulting in the extensive loss of life, especially by fire.
2.
a. Holocaust The genocide of European Jews and other groups by the Nazis during World War II: "Israel emerged from the Holocaust and is defined in relation to that catastrophe" (Emanuel Litvinoff).
b. A massive slaughter: "an important document in the so-far sketchy annals of the Cambodian holocaust" (Rod Nordland).
3. A sacrificial offering that is consumed entirely by flames.

[Middle English, burnt offering, from Old French holocauste, from Latin holocaustum, from Greek holokauston, from neuter of holokaustos, burnt whole : holo-, holo- + kaustos, burnt (from kaiein, to burn).]

hol′o·caus′tal, hol′o·caus′tic adj.
Usage Note: Holocaust has a secure place in the language when it refers to the massive destruction of humans by other humans. In our 1987 survey 99 percent of the Usage Panel accepted the use of holocaust in the phrase nuclear holocaust. Sixty percent accepted the sentence As many as two million people may have died in the holocaust that followed the Khmer Rouge takeover in Cambodia. But because of its associations with genocide, people may object to extended applications of holocaust. The percentage of the Panel's acceptance drops sharply when people use the word to refer to death brought about by natural causes. In our 1999 survey 47 percent approved the sentence In East Africa five years of drought have brought about a holocaust in which millions have died. Just 16 percent approved The press gives little coverage to the holocaust of malaria that goes on, year after year, in tropical countries, where there is no mention of widespread mortality. The Panel has little enthusiasm for more figurative usages of holocaust. In 1999, only 7 percent accepted Numerous small investors lost their stakes in the holocaust that followed the precipitous drop in stocks. This suggests that these extended uses of the word may be viewed as overblown or in poor taste.
Word History: Totality of destruction has been central to the meaning of holocaust since it first appeared in Middle English in the 1300s, used in reference to the biblical sacrifice in which a male animal was wholly burnt on the altar in worship of God. Holocaust comes from Greek holokauston, "that which is completely burnt," which was a translation of Hebrew 'ōlâ (literally "that which goes up," that is, in smoke). In this sense of "burnt sacrifice," holocaust is still used in some versions of the Bible. In the 1600s, the meaning of holocaust broadened to "something totally consumed by fire," and the word eventually was applied to fires of extreme destructiveness. In the 1900s, holocaust took on a variety of figurative meanings, summarizing the effects of war, rioting, storms, epidemic diseases, and even economic failures. Most of these usages arose after World War II, but it is unclear whether they permitted or resulted from the use of holocaust in reference to the mass murder of European Jews and others by the Nazis. This application of the word occurred as early as 1942, but the phrase the Holocaust did not become established until the late 1950s. Here it parallels and may have been influenced by another Hebrew word, šô'â, "catastrophe" (in English, Shoah). In the Bible šô'â has a range of meanings including "personal ruin or devastation" and "a wasteland or desert." Šô'â was first used to refer to the Nazi slaughter of Jews in 1939, but the phrase haš-šô'â, "the catastrophe," became established only after World War II. Holocaust has also been used to translate ḥurbān, "destruction," another Hebrew word used as a name for the genocide of Jews by the Nazis.

holocaust

(ˈhɒləˌkɔːst)
n
1. great destruction or loss of life or the source of such destruction, esp fire
2. (Historical Terms) (usually capital) Also called: the Churban or the Shoah the mass murder of Jews and members of many other ethnic, social, and political groups in continental Europe between 1940 and 1945 by the Nazi regime
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a rare word for burnt offering
[C13: from Late Latin holocaustum whole burnt offering, from Greek holokauston, from holo- + kaustos, from kaiein to burn]
ˌholoˈcaustal, ˌholoˈcaustic adj

hol•o•caust

(ˈhɒl əˌkɔst, ˈhoʊ lə-)

n.
1. a great or complete devastation or destruction, esp. by fire.
2. a sacrifice consumed by fire.
3. the Holocaust, the systematic mass slaughter of European Jews in Nazi concentration camps during World War II.
4. any reckless destruction of life.
[1200–50; Middle English < Late Latin holocaustum (Vulgate) < Greek holókauston (Septuagint), neuter of holókaustos burnt whole]

holocaust

1. a burnt offering or sacrifice.
2. large-scale destruction by fire or other violent means.
See also: Killing
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.holocaust - an act of mass destruction and loss of life (especially in war or by fire)holocaust - an act of mass destruction and loss of life (especially in war or by fire); "a nuclear holocaust"
destruction, devastation - the termination of something by causing so much damage to it that it cannot be repaired or no longer exists
2.Holocaust - the mass murder of Jews under the German Nazi regime from 1941 until 1945

holocaust

noun
1. devastation, destruction, carnage, genocide, inferno, annihilation, conflagration A nuclear holocaust seemed a very real possibility in the '50s.
2. genocide, massacre, carnage, mass murder, ethnic cleansing (euphemistic), annihilation, pogrom a fund for survivors of the holocaust and their families
Translations
مُحْرَقَه، كارثَه، إبادة كامِلَه
holocaust
holocaustvyhlazení
holocaustmasseudryddelse
holokaustijoukkotuhokansanmurhapolttouhri
holokauszt
Holocaust
brennifórn; fjöldamorî, òjóîarmorî
ホロコーストユダヤ人大虐殺
holokaustasmasinis sudeginimasmasinis sunaikinimas
holokausts, masveida iznīcināšana
całopalenieholokaust
Holocaust
holokavst
mahvolmatamamen yok olma
Holocaust

holocaust

[ˈhɒləkɔːst] N (fig) → holocausto m

Holocaust

[ˈhɒləkɔːst] n (HISTORY) the Holocaust → l'Holocauste

holocaust

[ˈhɒləkɔːst] nholocauste m
a nuclear holocaust → un holocauste nucléaire

holocaust

n
Inferno nt; nuclear holocaustAtominferno nt
(= mass extermination)Massenvernichtung f; (in Third Reich) → Holocaust m

holocaust

[ˈhɒləˌkɔːst] nolocausto

holocaust

(ˈholəkoːst) noun
great destruction, usually by fire, especially of people's lives.
the Holocaust
the annihilation of six million Jews during the second world war.
References in classic literature ?
The truth is, Alisande, these archaics are a little TOO simple; the vocabulary is too limited, and so, by consequence, descriptions suffer in the matter of variety; they run too much to level Saharas of fact, and not enough to picturesque detail; this throws about them a certain air of the monotonous; in fact the fights are all alike: a couple of people come together with great random -- random is a good word, and so is exegesis, for that matter, and so is holocaust, and de- falcation, and usufruct and a hundred others, but land
And it was Clarence who was responsible for this holocaust.
NEW YORK, April 1, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Scholastic today announced the publication of The Holocaust: The Story of Nazi Persecution and the Impact of Hate on Humanity, a nonfiction reader for Grades 7-10 that covers everything educators need to teach students about the Holocaust.
JASON McCartney MP has paid tribute to those murdered in the Holocaust.
A PUBLIC lecture about the legacy of the Holocaust is to take place in the North East.
STUDENTS at Stockton Sixth Form College were due to hear testimony from Holocaust survivor Marc Schatzberger today to commemorate Holocaust Memorial Day.
The Holocaust and Historical Methodology, edited by Dan Stone.
The multi-year work plan that Canada presented at this year s first plenary session of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance was successfully advanced by Alliance members, announced Jason Kenney, Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism.
Seven Holocaust scholars explore complex and challenging connections between the historical Holocaust, the way the Nazis understood nature, the way the victims of the Holocaust experienced nature, and the way people approach nature today on both individual and collective levels.
ref=concentrationcamps&_r=0) recent discovery in early March of more than 42,200 new sites used by the Nazis as ghettos, concentration and death camps, comes the re-drawing of the map of World War II, the Holocaust, and the Third Reich.
It includes new research and new viewpoints on the presence of the Holocaust in western culture and audiovisual media.

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