home-alone

home-alone

adj
(Social Welfare) informal (esp of a young child) left in a house, flat, etc unattended
References in periodicals archive ?
A HERO neighbour saved a terrified home-alone toddler's life as she clung to the rooftop of a block of flats 40ft up.
At month's end, a home-alone variance that even the state admits has worked well - and put nobody in harm's way - will end.
We agree that the home-alone variance, if done properly, supports independence for people," she says.
Home-Alone America: The Hidden Toll of Day Care, Behavioral Drugs, and Other Parent Substitutes, by Mary Eberstadt (New York: Sentinel, 2005), 218 pages, hardcover, $25.
In a memorable scene in the home-alone segment, a mother agrees to test her teenage son and is confident that he would never let a stranger in the house.
Helpful book titles and web sites are referenced to assist the home-alone worker.
Now, a Web site devoted to furthering understanding between dogs and their pet parents offers a free e-book about the home-alone canine.
The discovery was the second home-alone case to receive attention recently.
Third place winner, Brenda Cole, of Maryland, wanted to provide a way for pets to escape in the event of a house fire and created the Home-Alone Pet Fire Escape(TM).
The Home-Alone Pet Fire Escape(TM) also works with any standard smoke detector, to create a pet fire release system.
Drawing both the ire and the praise of social commentators, Mary Eberstadt's new book Home-Alone America: The Hidden Toll of Day Care, Behavioral Drugs, and Other Parent Substitutes (Sentinel, 2004) opens the proverbial "can of worms" on the subject of how children are raised in America.
The essence of Home-Alone America, Eberstadt says, is that "over the past few decades, more and more children have spent considerably less time in the company of their parents or other relatives, and numerous fundamental measures of their well-being have simultaneously gone into what once would have been judged scandalous decline.