homestead


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Related to homestead: Homestead Act

home·stead

 (hōm′stĕd′)
n.
1. A house, especially a farmhouse, with adjoining buildings and land.
2. Law Property qualifying as a person's home under certain laws, such as laws providing tax abatements and exemptions, survivorship rights for spouse and children, and immunity from claims of creditors.
3. Land claimed by a settler or squatter, especially under the Homestead Act.
4. The place where one's home is.
v. home·stead·ed, home·stead·ing, home·steads
v.intr.
To settle and farm land, especially under the Homestead Act.
v.tr.
To claim and settle (land) as a homestead.

home′stead′er n.

homestead

(ˈhəʊmˌstɛd; -stɪd)
n
1. (Agriculture) a house or estate and the adjoining land, buildings, etc, esp a farm
2. (Law) (in the US) a house and adjoining land designated by the owner as his fixed residence and exempt under the homestead laws from seizure and forced sale for debts
3. (Law) (in western Canada) a piece of land, usually 160 acres, granted to a settler by the federal government
4. (Agriculture) Austral and NZ the owner's or manager's residence on a sheep or cattle station; in New Zealand the term includes all outbuildings

home•stead

(ˈhoʊm stɛd, -stɪd)

n., v. -stead•ed, -stead•ing. n.
1. a dwelling with its land and buildings occupied by the owner as a home and exempted by a homestead law from seizure or sale for debt.
2. any dwelling with its land and buildings where a family makes its home.
3. a tract of land acquired under the Homestead Act.
v.t.
4. to acquire or settle on (land) as a homestead.
v.i.
5. to acquire or settle on a homestead.
[before 1000]
home′stead`er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.homestead - the home and adjacent grounds occupied by a familyhomestead - the home and adjacent grounds occupied by a family
land - the land on which real estate is located; "he built the house on land leased from the city"
2.homestead - land acquired from the United States public lands by filing a record and living on and cultivating it under the homestead law
acres, demesne, landed estate, estate, land - extensive landed property (especially in the country) retained by the owner for his own use; "the family owned a large estate on Long Island"
3.homestead - dwelling that is usually a farmhouse and adjoining land
dwelling, dwelling house, habitation, home, abode, domicile - housing that someone is living in; "he built a modest dwelling near the pond"; "they raise money to provide homes for the homeless"
Verb1.homestead - settle land given by the government and occupy it as a homestead
settle - form a community; "The Swedes settled in Minnesota"
Translations
البَيْت العائِلي
statek
bondegård
tanya
bústaîur, bÿli; bóndabær
gazdovstvo

homestead

[ˈhəʊmsted] N (esp US) → casa f, caserío m; (= farm) → granja f

homestead

[ˈhəʊmstɛd] n (= house) → propriété f (= farm) → ferme fhome straight home stretch n
[race] → dernière ligne f droite
to be in the home straight → être dans la dernière ligne droite
(fig)dernière ligne f droite
to be in the home straight → être dans la dernière ligne droitehome team n (SPORT)équipe f qui reçoithome town n
my home town (place of birth)ma ville natale; (where I grew up)la ville où j'ai grandi; (where I now live)la ville où je résidehome truth n
to tell sb some home truths → dire ses quatre vérités à qn
I'll tell him a few home truths → Je vais lui dire ses quatre vérités.home video nvidéo f amateurhome visit n (by doctor)visite f à domicile

homestead

[ˈhəʊmˌstɛd] ncasa colonica

home

(həum) noun
1. the house, town, country etc where a person etc usually lives. I work in London but my home is in Bournemouth; When I retire, I'll make my home in Bournemouth; Africa is the home of the lion; We'll have to find a home for the kitten.
2. the place from which a person, thing etc comes originally. America is the home of jazz.
3. a place where children without parents, old people, people who are ill etc live and are looked after. an old folk's home; a nursing home.
4. a place where people stay while they are working. a nurses' home.
5. a house. Crumpy Construction build fine homes for fine people; He invited me round to his home.
adjective
1. of a person's home or family. home comforts.
2. of the country etc where a person lives. home produce.
3. (in football) playing or played on a team's own ground. the home team; a home game.
adverb
1. to a person's home. I'm going home now; Hallo – I'm home!
2. completely; to the place, position etc a thing is intended to be. He drove the nail home; Few of his punches went home; These photographs of the war brought home to me the suffering of the soldiers.
ˈhomeless noun plural, adjective
(people) without a place to live in. This charity was set up to help the homeless; homeless people.
ˈhomely adjective
1. simple but pleasant. homely food.
2. making a person feel he is at home. a homely atmosphere.
3. (American) (of a person) not attractive; ugly.
ˈhomeliness noun
ˈhoming adjective
1. (of pigeons etc) which (can) fly home when set free a long way from home.
2. able to take a missile etc to its target. These torpedoes have homing devices in their noses.
ˈhome-coming noun
1. the return home of a person (who has been away for some time). We had a party to celebrate his home-coming.
2. (American) an annual event held by a college, a university or high school for former students.
ˌhome-ˈgrown adjective
grown in one's own garden or in one's own country. These tomatoes are home-grown.
ˈhomeland noun
a person's native land. Immigrants often weep for their homeland.
ˌhome-ˈmade adjective
made by a person at home; not professionally made. home-made jam; home-made furniture.
home rule
the government of a country or part of a country by its own citizens.
ˈhomesick adjective
missing one's home. When the boy first went to boarding-school he was very homesick.
ˈhomesickness noun
ˈhomestead (-sted) noun
a house, especially a farm, with the land and other buildings (eg barns) which belong to it, especially in the United States, Australia etc.
home truth
a plain statement of something which is unpleasant but true (about a person, his behaviour etc) said directly to the person. It's time someone told him a few home truths.
ˈhomeward adjective
going home. his homeward journey.
ˈhomeward(s) adverb
towards home. his journey homeward; He journeyed homewards.
ˈhomework noun
work or study done at home, especially by a school pupil. Finish your homework!
at home
1. in one's home. I'm afraid he's not at home.
2. (in football etc) in one's own ground. The team is playing at home today.
be/feel at home
to feel as relaxed as one does in one's own home or in a place or situation one knows well. I always feel at home in France; He's quite at home with cows – he used to live on a farm.
home in on
to move towards (a target etc). The missile is designed to home in on aircraft.
leave home
1. to leave one's house. I usually leave home at 7.30 a.m.
2. to leave one's home to go and live somewhere else. He left home at the age of fifteen to get a job in Australia.
make oneself at home
to make oneself as comfortable and relaxed as one would at home. Make yourself at home!
nothing to write home about
not very good. The concert was nothing to write home about.
References in classic literature ?
The Bohemian family, grandmother told me as we drove along, had bought the homestead of a fellow countryman, Peter Krajiek, and had paid him more than it was worth.
No one knows better than yourself that the money advanced you on the deeds of this homestead has never been repaid.
Matthew Maule, on the other hand, though an obscure man, was stubborn in the defence of what he considered his right; and, for several years, he succeeded in protecting the acre or two of earth which, with his own toil, he had hewn out of the primeval forest, to be his garden ground and homestead.
From father to son, for above a hundred years, they followed the sea; a grey-headed shipmaster, in each generation, retiring from the quarter-deck to the homestead, while a boy of fourteen took the hereditary place before the mast, confronting the salt spray and the gale which had blustered against his sire and grandsire.
Morse had lived for several years at the Vail homestead in Morristown; and it was here that he erected his first telegraph line, a three-mile circle around the Iron Works, in 1838.
He looked like some lion of the wilderness that stalks about exulting in his strength and defying both wind and rain; his eyes glare as he prowls in quest of oxen, sheep, or deer, for he is famished, and will dare break even into a well fenced homestead, trying to get at the sheep--even such did Ulysses seem to the young women, as he drew near to them all naked as he was, for he was in great want.
That rich undulating district of Loamshire to which Hayslope belonged lies close to a grim outskirt of Stonyshire, overlooked by its barren hills as a pretty blooming sister may sometimes be seen linked in the arm of a rugged, tall, swarthy brother; and in two or three hours' ride the traveller might exchange a bleak treeless region, intersected by lines of cold grey stone, for one where his road wound under the shelter of woods, or up swelling hills, muffled with hedgerows and long meadow-grass and thick corn; and where at every turn he came upon some fine old country-seat nestled in the valley or crowning the slope, some homestead with its long length of barn and its cluster of golden ricks, some grey steeple looking out from a pretty confusion of trees and thatch and dark-red tiles.
As countless swarms of flies buzz around a herdsman's homestead in the time of spring when the pails are drenched with milk, even so did the Achaeans swarm on to the plain to charge the Trojans and destroy them.
Still, there was great uncertainty which of these vocations the youth was best endowed to fill; but, having no other employment, the stripling was constantly lounging about the homestead,” munching green apples and hunting for sorrel; when the same sagacious eye that had brought to light his latent talents seized upon this circumstance as a clew to his future path through the turmoils of the world.
Kim was guided to the Temple of the Tirthankars, about a mile outside the city, near Sarnath, by a chance-met Punjabi farmer - a Kamboh from Jullundur-way who had appealed in vain to every God of his homestead to cure his small son, and was trying Benares as a last resort.
I have stood many a time and thought what a neat little homestead it would make.
But one of the girls who occupied an adjoining bed was more wakeful than Tess, and would insist upon relating to the latter various particulars of the homestead into which she had just entered.