homogeneous


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Related to homogeneous: Homogeneous mixture

ho·mo·ge·ne·ous

 (hō′mə-jē′nē-əs, -jēn′yəs)
adj.
1. Consisting of parts that are the same; uniform in structure or composition: "a tight-knit, homogeneous society" (James Fallows).
2. Of the same or similar nature or kind: "Professional archivists ... developed more or less homogeneous conservation practices" (David Howard).
3. Mathematics Consisting of terms of the same degree or elements of the same dimension.

[From Medieval Latin homogeneus, from Greek homogenēs : homo-, homo- + genos, kind; see heterogeneous.]

ho′mo·ge′ne·ous·ly adv.
ho′mo·ge′ne·ous·ness n.

homogeneous

(ˌhəʊməˈdʒiːnɪəs; ˌhɒm-)
adj
1. composed of similar or identical parts or elements
2. of uniform nature
3. similar in kind or nature
4. (General Physics) having a constant property, such as density, throughout
5. (Mathematics) maths
a. (of a polynomial) containing terms of the same degree with respect to all the variables, as in x2 + 2xy + y2
b. (of a function) containing a set of variables such that when each is multiplied by a constant, this constant can be eliminated without altering the value of the function, as in cos x/y + x/y
c. (of an equation) containing a homogeneous function made equal to 0
6. (Chemistry) chem of, composed of, or concerned with a single phase. Compare heterogeneous
Also (for senses 1–4): homogenous
homogeneity n
ˌhomoˈgeneously adv
ˌhomoˈgeneousness n

ho•mo•ge•ne•ous

(ˌhoʊ məˈdʒi ni əs, -ˈdʒin yəs, ˌhɒm ə-)

adj.
1. composed of parts or elements that are all of the same kind; not heterogeneous: a homogeneous population.
2. of the same kind or nature; essentially alike.
3. Math.
a. having a common property throughout: a homogeneous solid figure.
b. having all terms of the same degree: a homogeneous equation.
[1635–45; < Medieval Latin homogeneus < Greek homogenḗs of the same kind; see homo-, -gen, -ous]
ho`mo•ge•ne′i•ty (-dʒəˈni ɪ ti) ho`mo•ge′ne•ous•ness, n.
ho`mo•ge′ne•ous•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.homogeneous - all of the same or similar kind or nature; "a close-knit homogeneous group"
undiversified - not diversified
uniform, unvarying - always the same; showing a single form or character in all occurrences; "a street of uniform tall white buildings"
same - closely similar or comparable in kind or quality or quantity or degree; "curtains the same color as the walls"; "two girls of the same age"; "mother and son have the same blue eyes"; "animals of the same species"; "the same rules as before"; "two boxes having the same dimensions"; "the same day next year"
heterogeneous, heterogenous - consisting of elements that are not of the same kind or nature; "the population of the United States is vast and heterogeneous"

homogeneous

homogenous
Translations
مُتَجانِس
homogennístejnorodý
ensartethomogen
homogén
vienalytis
homogens, viendabigs
rovnorodý

homogeneous

[ˌhɒməˈdʒiːnɪəs] ADJhomogéneo

homogeneous

[ˌhɒməʊˈdʒiːniəs ˌhəʊməʊˈdʒiːniəs] adj [group, population, society] → homogène

homogeneous

adjhomogen

homogeneous

[ˌhɒməˈdʒiːnɪəs] homogenous [həˈmɒdʒɪnəs] adjomogeneo/a

homogeneous

(ˌhəuməˈdʒiːniəs) adjective
formed of parts or elements that are all of the same kind. homogeneous and heterogeneous classes; a homogeneous society.

ho·mo·ge·ne·ous

a. homogéneo-a, semejante, de la misma naturaleza.
References in classic literature ?
In order to become majestic, it should be viewed from some vantage point, as it rolls its slow and long array through the centre of a wide plain, or the stateliest public square of a city; for then, by its remoteness, it melts all the petty personalities, of which it is made up, into one broad mass of existence,--one great life,--one collected body of mankind, with a vast, homogeneous spirit animating it.
Of course, we could not COUNT the dead, because they did not exist as individuals, but merely as homogeneous protoplasm, with alloys of iron and buttons.
They are kept together by the peculiarity of their topographical position; by their individual weakness and insignificancy; by the fear of powerful neighbors, to one of which they were formerly subject; by the few sources of contention among a people of such simple and homogeneous manners; by their joint interest in their dependent possessions; by the mutual aid they stand in need of, for suppressing insurrections and rebellions, an aid expressly stipulated and often required and afforded; and by the necessity of some regular and permanent provision for accomodating disputes among the cantons.
Lambert leads an army devoid of homogeneous principles, and there is no possible army with such elements.
These things, then, appertain to all democracies; namely, to be established on that principle of justice which is homogeneous to those governments; that is, that all the members of the state, by number, should enjoy an equality, which seems chiefly to constitute a democracy, or government of the people: for it seems perfectly equal that the rich should have no more share in the government than the poor, nor be alone in power; but that all should be equal, according to number; for thus, they think, the equality and liberty of the state best preserved.
of which those of our readers who have had the good fortune to see a Gothic city entire, complete, homogeneous,--a few of which still remain, Nuremberg in Bavaria and Vittoria in Spain,--can readily form an idea; or even smaller specimens, provided that they are well preserved,--Vitré in Brittany, Nordhausen in Prussia.
No doubt, with a highly organised and undamaged Government and a homogeneous and well-disciplined people that would have sufficed to keep the peace.
And I am more and more convinced that it will be possible to demonstrate the homogeneous origin of all the tissues.
Life became homogeneous again, instead of being made up of detached fragments.
But what could they know of all this while they drifted so gently day by day in what they thought was a limitless and homogeneous ocean?
When the homogeneous atoms of a mineral, moving freely in solution, arrange themselves into shapes mathematically perfect, or particles of frozen moisture into the symmetrical and beautiful forms of snowflakes, you have nothing to say.
Now he is not homogeneous, but heterogeneous, and the ray does not traverse; there are no thorough lights, but the eye of the beholder is puzzled, detecting many unlike tendencies and a life not yet at one.