homologous

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ho·mol·o·gous

 (hə-mŏl′ə-gəs, hō-)
adj.
1. Corresponding or similar in position, value, structure, or function.
2. Derived from the same species: a homologous graft.
3. Biology Similar in structure and evolutionary origin, though not necessarily in function, as the flippers of a seal and the hands of a human.
4. Immunology Relating to the correspondence between an antigen and the antibody produced in response to it.
5. Genetics
a. Relating to chromosomes that have the same morphology and linear sequence of gene loci.
b. Relating to genes that are derived from a common ancestor.
6. Chemistry Belonging to or being a series of organic compounds, each successive member of which differs from the preceding member by a constant increment, especially by an added CH2 group.

[From Greek homologos, agreeing : homo-, homo- + logos, word, proportion; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

homologous

(həʊˈmɒləɡəs; hɒ-) ,

homological

or

homologic

adj
1. having a related or similar position, structure, etc
2. (Chemistry) chem (of a series of organic compounds) having similar characteristics and structure but differing by a number of CH2 groups
3. (Medicine) med
a. (of two or more tissues) identical in structure
b. (of a vaccine) prepared from the infecting microorganism
4. (Biology) biology (of organs and parts) having the same evolutionary origin but different functions: the wing of a bat and the paddle of a whale are homologous. Compare analogous2
5. (Mathematics) maths (of elements) playing a similar role in distinct figures or functions
ˌhomoˈlogically adv

ho•mol•o•gous

(həˈmɒl ə gəs, hoʊ-)

adj.
1. having the same or a similar relation; corresponding, as in relative position or structure.
2. Biol. corresponding in structure and in evolutionary origin but not necessarily in function, as the wing of a bird and the foreleg of a horse (opposed to analogous).
3. having the same alleles or genes in the same order of arrangement.
4. of the same chemical type, but differing by a fixed increment of an atom or a constant group of atoms.
5. pertaining to an antigen and its specific antibody.
[1650–60; < Medieval Latin homologus < Greek homólogos agreeing; see homo-, -logous]

ho·mol·o·gous

(hə-mŏl′ə-gəs)
1. Similar in structure and evolutionary origin but having different functions, as a human's arm and a seal's flipper. Compare analogous.
2. Being a set of two pairs of chromosomes, one pair from the female parent and one from the male parent, having genes for the same trait in the same positions. Genes on homologous chromosomes may not have the same form, however. For example, one set of homologous chromosomes may contain a gene for brown eyes and the other for blue eyes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.homologous - having the same evolutionary origin but not necessarily the same function; "the wing of a bat and the arm of a man are homologous"
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
analogous - corresponding in function but not in evolutionary origin; "the wings of a bee and those of a hummingbird are analogous"
heterologic, heterological, heterologous - not corresponding in structure or evolutionary origin
2.homologous - corresponding or similar in position or structure or function or characteristics; especially derived from an organism of the same species; "a homologous tissue graft"
autologous - derived from organisms of the selfsame individual; "autologous blood donation"
heterologous - derived from organisms of a different but related species; "a heterologous graft"

homologous

adjective similar, like, corresponding, related, correspondent, parallel, comparable, analogous The homologous chromosomes remain attached to each other.
Translations
homolog

homologous

adjhomolog

homologous

[həʊˈmɒləgəs] adjomologo/a

ho·mol·o·gous

a. homólogo-a, similar en estructura y origen pero no en funcionamiento.
References in periodicals archive ?
Significant homologies in sequences of PVX Pakistani isolate and that of a Scottish isolate suggested that transportation of virus infected potato and potato trade globalization are the key factors responsible for presence of geographically distinct isolate in Pakistan.
I would like to assert that capital ideas are settler-colonial ideas, but I am trying to avoid homologies for the moment.
A major, groundbreaking work of evolutionary and developmental biology, this monograph tackles the difficult question of the origins of homological traits in species, and provides a fundamental theory explaining how homologies arise.
Though BLAST is the most powerful sequence alignment tool, it can overlook some significant homologies.
81 (11) and the generated alignments were used to determine the percentage of homologies between sequences using Bioedit software (USA).
Primary homologies are almost Baconian observations--a, b, and c correspond or are similar in some way, and therefore may be the same structure modified during descent from a common ancestor.
The 13 papers cover Heegaard Floer homology and knot theory, Floer homologies and contact structures, and symplectic four-manifolds and Seiberg-Witten invariants.