homologous


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ho·mol·o·gous

 (hə-mŏl′ə-gəs, hō-)
adj.
1. Corresponding or similar in position, value, structure, or function.
2. Derived from the same species: a homologous graft.
3. Biology Similar in structure and evolutionary origin, though not necessarily in function, as the flippers of a seal and the hands of a human.
4. Immunology Relating to the correspondence between an antigen and the antibody produced in response to it.
5. Genetics
a. Relating to chromosomes that have the same morphology and linear sequence of gene loci.
b. Relating to genes that are derived from a common ancestor.
6. Chemistry Belonging to or being a series of organic compounds, each successive member of which differs from the preceding member by a constant increment, especially by an added CH2 group.

[From Greek homologos, agreeing : homo-, homo- + logos, word, proportion; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

homologous

(həʊˈmɒləɡəs; hɒ-) ,

homological

or

homologic

adj
1. having a related or similar position, structure, etc
2. (Chemistry) chem (of a series of organic compounds) having similar characteristics and structure but differing by a number of CH2 groups
3. (Medicine) med
a. (of two or more tissues) identical in structure
b. (of a vaccine) prepared from the infecting microorganism
4. (Biology) biology (of organs and parts) having the same evolutionary origin but different functions: the wing of a bat and the paddle of a whale are homologous. Compare analogous2
5. (Mathematics) maths (of elements) playing a similar role in distinct figures or functions
ˌhomoˈlogically adv

ho•mol•o•gous

(həˈmɒl ə gəs, hoʊ-)

adj.
1. having the same or a similar relation; corresponding, as in relative position or structure.
2. Biol. corresponding in structure and in evolutionary origin but not necessarily in function, as the wing of a bird and the foreleg of a horse (opposed to analogous).
3. having the same alleles or genes in the same order of arrangement.
4. of the same chemical type, but differing by a fixed increment of an atom or a constant group of atoms.
5. pertaining to an antigen and its specific antibody.
[1650–60; < Medieval Latin homologus < Greek homólogos agreeing; see homo-, -logous]

ho·mol·o·gous

(hə-mŏl′ə-gəs)
1. Similar in structure and evolutionary origin but having different functions, as a human's arm and a seal's flipper. Compare analogous.
2. Being a set of two pairs of chromosomes, one pair from the female parent and one from the male parent, having genes for the same trait in the same positions. Genes on homologous chromosomes may not have the same form, however. For example, one set of homologous chromosomes may contain a gene for brown eyes and the other for blue eyes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.homologous - having the same evolutionary origin but not necessarily the same function; "the wing of a bat and the arm of a man are homologous"
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
analogous - corresponding in function but not in evolutionary origin; "the wings of a bee and those of a hummingbird are analogous"
heterologic, heterological, heterologous - not corresponding in structure or evolutionary origin
2.homologous - corresponding or similar in position or structure or function or characteristics; especially derived from an organism of the same species; "a homologous tissue graft"
autologous - derived from organisms of the selfsame individual; "autologous blood donation"
heterologous - derived from organisms of a different but related species; "a heterologous graft"

homologous

adjective similar, like, corresponding, related, correspondent, parallel, comparable, analogous The homologous chromosomes remain attached to each other.
Translations
homolog

homologous

adjhomolog

homologous

[həʊˈmɒləgəs] adjomologo/a

ho·mol·o·gous

a. homólogo-a, similar en estructura y origen pero no en funcionamiento.
References in classic literature ?
The several parts of the body which are homologous, and which, at an early embryonic period, are alike, seem liable to vary in an allied manner: we see this in the right and left sides of the body varying in the same manner; in the front and hind legs, and even in the jaws and limbs, varying together, for the lower jaw is believed to be homologous with the limbs.
Homologous parts, as has been remarked by some authors, tend to cohere; this is often seen in monstrous plants; and nothing is more common than the union of homologous parts in normal structures, as the union of the petals of the corolla into a tube.
The Company also provided a reimbursement update in light of the recently issued FDA Final and Draft Guidance documents related to human tissue titled, "Regulatory Considerations for Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products: Minimal Manipulation and Homologous Use".
Contract Awarded for Considering Homologous and Non-homologous Recombination in Outbreak Analysis
M2 PHARMA-September 6, 2017-Amnio Technology unveils PalinGen InovAFlo in the US for homologous use to supplement tissue for protection, cushioning and lubrication
M2 EQUITYBITES-September 6, 2017-Amnio Technology unveils PalinGen InovAFlo in the US for homologous use to supplement tissue for protection, cushioning and lubrication
The aim of this study was to determine whether TALEN-mediated homologous recombination system on the Sall1 gene locus in the porcine primary somatic cells is much more efficient than conventional homologous recombination system.
The MVA-based vaccine was well tolerated and induced antibodies to both the homologous (A/Vietnam/1194/2004, clade 1) and a heterologous (A/Indonesia/5/2005, clade 2.
Species identification using sequence identity of homologous regions was recently reported for Pilobolus (Foos & Sheehan 2011).
This demonstration further reinforces the idea that the synapse of homologous chromosomes is a hallmark of meiosis because the bi-orientation of nonsister kinetochores (two kinetochores from homologous chromosomes) results in the physical separation of the homologous chromosomes (Luo, 2009).
You might notice all these numbers are even; this is because chromosomes are usually organized in sets of homologous pairs (this will be important later).
homologous parasite) phenomenon in at least some instances.