homolosine projection


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Related to homolosine projection: Mercator projection, Robinson projection, Azimuthal projection
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homolosine projection

ho·mol·o·sine projection

 (hō-mŏl′ə-sīn′, -sĭn, hə-)
n.
A composite of two map projections designed to represent area proportionally to the area on the earth's surface and represent true shapes of continents. Homolosine projections of the earth are usually interrupted in ocean areas. Also called Goode homolosine projection.

homolosine projection

(hɒˈmɒləˌsaɪn)
n
(Physical Geography) a map projection of the world on which the oceans are distorted to allow for greater accuracy in representing the continents, combining the sinusoidal and equal-area projections
[C20: from homolographic + sine1]
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homolosine projection

ho·mol·o·sine projection

(hō-mŏl′ə-sīn′)
A method of making a flat map of the Earth's surface with interruptions in the oceans so that the continents appear with the most accurate area and shape possible. Compare conic projection, Mercator projection, sinusoidal projection.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.homolosine projection - an equal-area projection map of the globe; oceans are distorted in order to minimize the distortion of the continents
equal-area map projection, equal-area projection - a map projection in which quadrilaterals formed by meridians and parallels have an area on the map proportional to their area on the globe
References in periodicals archive ?
The resulting Goode homolosine projection is most common in its interrupted form.
Although best known for the homolosine projection and the initiator of Goode's School Atlas, he taught some of the first courses on thematic cartography and graphics at Chicago.
To better preserve areas, the interrupted Goode homolosine projection has been recommended for global-raster GIS databases because it uses six lobes, each with its own central meridian (resulting in 12 regions for implementation), and can be composited into a single world view (Steinwand 1994).