hood


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hood 1

 (ho͝od)
n.
1. A loose pliable covering for the head and neck, often attached to a robe or jacket.
2. An ornamental draping of cloth hung from the shoulders of an academic or ecclesiastical robe.
3. A sack placed over the head of a falcon to keep it quiet.
4.
a. A metal cover or cowl for a hearth or stove.
b. A carriage top.
c. The hinged metal lid over the engine of a motor vehicle.
5. Zoology A colored marking or an expanded part, such as a crest, on or near the head of an animal.
tr.v. hood·ed, hood·ing, hoods
To supply or cover with a hood.

[Middle English hod, from Old English hōd.]

hood 2

 (ho͝od)
n. Slang
1. A hoodlum; a thug.
2. A rowdy or violent young person.

[Short for hoodlum.]

hood 3

or 'hood  (ho͝od)
n. Slang
A neighborhood, usually in the inner city.

[African American Vernacular English, short for neighborhood.]

hood

(hʊd)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a loose head covering either attached to a cloak or coat or made as a separate garment
2. something resembling this in shape or use
3. (Automotive Engineering) the US and Canadian name for bonnet3
4. (Automotive Engineering) the folding roof of a convertible car
5. (Clothing & Fashion) a hoodlike garment worn over an academic gown, indicating its wearer's degree and university
6. (Falconry) falconry a close-fitting cover, placed over the head and eyes of a falcon to keep it quiet when not hunting
7. (Biology) biology a structure or marking, such as the fold of skin on the head of a cobra, that covers or appears to cover the head or some similar part
vb
(tr) to cover or provide with or as if with a hood
[Old English hōd; related to Old High German huot hat, Middle Dutch hoet, Latin cassis helmet; see hat]
ˈhoodless adj
ˈhoodˌlike adj

hood

(hʊd)
n
slang short for hoodlum1

Hood

(hʊd)
n
1. (Biography) Robin See Robin Hood
2. (Biography) Samuel, 1st Viscount. 1724–1816, British admiral. He fought successfully against the French during the American Revolution and the French Revolutionary Wars
3. (Biography) Thomas. 1799–1845, British poet and humorist: his work includes protest poetry, such as The Song of the Shirt (1843) and The Bridge of Sighs (1844)

hood1

(hʊd)

n., v. hood•ed, hood•ing. n.
1. a soft or flexible covering for the head and neck, either separate or attached to a cloak, coat, etc.
2. something resembling this, esp. in shape, as certain petals or sepals.
3. the hinged movable part of an automobile body covering the engine.
4. a metal canopy for a stove, ventilator, etc.
5. a cover for the entire head of a falcon, used when the bird is not pursuing game.
6. an ornamental ruffle or fold on the back of the shoulders of an academic gown, jurist's robe, etc.
7. a hoodlike crest, band of color or fold of skin on the head of certain birds and animals.
v.t.
8. to furnish with a hood.
9. to cover with or as if with a hood.
[before 900; Middle English hode, Old English hōd, c. Old Frisian hōd, Middle Dutch hoet, Old High German huot]

hood2

(hʊd, hud)

n. Slang.
a hoodlum.
[1925–30; by shortening]

'hood

(hʊd)
n. Slang.
a neighborhood, esp. one in the inner city (usu. prec. by the).
[1965–70; by shortening]

Hood

(hʊd)

n.
1. John Bell, 1831–79, Confederate general.
2. Raymond Mathewson, 1881–1934, U.S. architect.
3. Robin, Robin Hood.
4. Thomas, 1799–1845, English poet and humorist.
5. Mount, a volcanic peak in N Oregon, in the Cascade Range. 11,253 ft. (3430 m).

-hood

a noun suffix denoting condition, character, etc., or a body of persons of a particular character or class: childhood; priesthood.
[Middle English -hode, -hod, Old English -hād, as independent n.: condition, quality, rank; c. Old Saxon hēd, Old High German heit state, Old Norse heithr honor, Gothic haidus manner]

hood

  • apartheid - From Dutch apart, "separate," and -heid, "-hood," it is pronounced uh-PAHR-tayt or uh-PAHR-tight.
  • chaperone, chaperon - Chaperone comes from French chaperon, meaning "hood" or "cowl, head covering," which was worn from the 16th century by ladies who served as guides and guardians; chaperon is the standard spelling and chaperone is a variant resulting from pronunciation.
  • cobra - From Portuguese cobra de capello, "snake with hood"—based on Latin colubra, "snake."
  • hood - Etymologically, hood and hat are the same word, ultimately both meaning "head-covering."

bonnet

hood

In British English, the metal cover over the engine of a car is called the bonnet.

I lifted the bonnet to see what the problem was.

In American English, it is called the hood.

I looked under the hood to watch the mechanic at work.

hood


Past participle: hooded
Gerund: hooding

Imperative
hood
hood
Present
I hood
you hood
he/she/it hoods
we hood
you hood
they hood
Preterite
I hooded
you hooded
he/she/it hooded
we hooded
you hooded
they hooded
Present Continuous
I am hooding
you are hooding
he/she/it is hooding
we are hooding
you are hooding
they are hooding
Present Perfect
I have hooded
you have hooded
he/she/it has hooded
we have hooded
you have hooded
they have hooded
Past Continuous
I was hooding
you were hooding
he/she/it was hooding
we were hooding
you were hooding
they were hooding
Past Perfect
I had hooded
you had hooded
he/she/it had hooded
we had hooded
you had hooded
they had hooded
Future
I will hood
you will hood
he/she/it will hood
we will hood
you will hood
they will hood
Future Perfect
I will have hooded
you will have hooded
he/she/it will have hooded
we will have hooded
you will have hooded
they will have hooded
Future Continuous
I will be hooding
you will be hooding
he/she/it will be hooding
we will be hooding
you will be hooding
they will be hooding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hooding
you have been hooding
he/she/it has been hooding
we have been hooding
you have been hooding
they have been hooding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hooding
you will have been hooding
he/she/it will have been hooding
we will have been hooding
you will have been hooding
they will have been hooding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hooding
you had been hooding
he/she/it had been hooding
we had been hooding
you had been hooding
they had been hooding
Conditional
I would hood
you would hood
he/she/it would hood
we would hood
you would hood
they would hood
Past Conditional
I would have hooded
you would have hooded
he/she/it would have hooded
we would have hooded
you would have hooded
they would have hooded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hood - an aggressive and violent young criminalhood - an aggressive and violent young criminal
bully - a hired thug
criminal, crook, felon, malefactor, outlaw - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
2.hood - a protective covering that is part of a plant
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
covering, natural covering, cover - a natural object that covers or envelops; "under a covering of dust"; "the fox was flushed from its cover"
3.hood - (slang) a neighborhood
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
neighborhood, neighbourhood - people living near one another; "it is a friendly neighborhood"; "my neighborhood voted for Bush"
4.hood - a tubular attachment used to keep stray light out of the lens of a camera
attachment - a supplementary part or accessory
camera, photographic camera - equipment for taking photographs (usually consisting of a lightproof box with a lens at one end and light-sensitive film at the other)
television camera, tv camera, camera - television equipment consisting of a lens system that focuses an image on a photosensitive mosaic that is scanned by an electron beam
5.hood - (falconry) a leather covering for a hawk's head
covering - an artifact that covers something else (usually to protect or shelter or conceal it)
falconry - the art of training falcons to hunt and return
6.hood - metal covering leading to a vent that exhausts smoke or fumes
covering - an artifact that covers something else (usually to protect or shelter or conceal it)
range hood - exhaust hood over a kitchen range
7.hood - the folding roof of a carriage
calash top, caleche, calash - the folding hood of a horse-drawn carriage
roof - protective covering on top of a motor vehicle
8.hood - a headdress that protects the head and face
calash, caleche - a woman's large folded hooped hood; worn in the 18th century
aventail, camail, ventail - a medieval hood of mail suspended from a basinet to protect the head and neck
cowl - a loose hood or hooded robe (as worn by a monk)
headdress, headgear - clothing for the head
9.hood - protective covering consisting of a metal part that covers the enginehood - protective covering consisting of a metal part that covers the engine; "there are powerful engines under the hoods of new cars"; "the mechanic removed the cowling in order to repair the plane's engine"
aeroplane, airplane, plane - an aircraft that has a fixed wing and is powered by propellers or jets; "the flight was delayed due to trouble with the airplane"
auto, automobile, car, motorcar, machine - a motor vehicle with four wheels; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine; "he needs a car to get to work"
hood ornament - an ornament on the front of the hood of a car emblematic of the manufacturer
protective cover, protective covering, protection - a covering that is intend to protect from damage or injury; "they had no protection from the fallout"; "wax provided protection for the floors"
10.hood - (zoology) an expandable part or marking that resembles a hood on the head or neck of an animal
external body part - any body part visible externally
zoological science, zoology - the branch of biology that studies animals
Verb1.hood - cover with a hood; "The bandits were hooded"
cover - provide with a covering or cause to be covered; "cover her face with a handkerchief"; "cover the child with a blanket"; "cover the grave with flowers"

hood

noun
1. cowl, scarf, snood The hood zips away into the collar.
2. cap, cover Why aren't all lenses supplied with a lens hood?

hood

noun
1. Slang. A person who treats others violently and roughly, especially for hire:
Informal: hooligan.
Slang: goon, gorilla.
2. Slang. A rough, violent person who engages in destructive actions:
Informal: toughie.
Slang: punk.
Translations
غِطاء السيّارهغِطَاء مُحَرِّك السيَّارةقَلُنْسُوَةقَلَنْسُوَه، غِطاء للرأسمِظَلَّة لعربَة الأطْفال
kapucekapotasklopná střechakápě
hættemotorhjelmpyntehættekaleche
huppukonepeltikoppasuojus
haubakapuljača
csuklyakapucni
hettahlíf, hetta; òekjahúdd, vélarhlífsíî heiîurshetta
フードボンネット
두건보닛
gaubtasgaubtuvaskapišonassu gaubtusu gobtuvu
kapucenolaižams jumtspārsegs
sklápacia strecha
kapucamotorni pokrov
huvamotorhuv
ฝากระโปรงรถยนต์หมวกครอบ
cốp xe ôtômũ trùm đầu

hood

[hʊd] N
1. [of cloak, raincoat] → capucha f (Univ) → muceta f
2. (Brit) (Aut) → capota f (US) → capó m
3. (= cover) (on pram) → capota; (on cooker) → tapa f; (on chimney pot) → campana f
4. (esp US) (= hoodlum) → matón/ona m/f, gorila m

hood

[ˈhʊd] n
[coat, anorak] → capuche f
(US) (= bonnet) [car] → capot m
(= hoodlum) → truand m

hood

n
Kapuze f; (thief’s) → Maske f; (hawk’s) → Kappe f
(Aut) (= roof)Verdeck nt; (US: = bonnet) → (Motor)haube f; (on fireplace etc) → Abzug m; (on cooker) → Abzugshaube f
(of cobra)Brillenzeichnung f
(esp US inf) (= gangster)Gangster m (inf), → Ganove m (inf); (= young ruffian)Rowdy m, → Rüpel m
(esp US inf: = neighbourhood) → Gegend f, → Viertel nt
(esp US sl: = ghetto) → G(h)etto nt
vteine Kapuze aufsetzen (+dat); hawkeine Kappe aufsetzen (+dat)

hood

[hʊd] n
a. (of cloak, raincoat) → cappuccio; (on pram) (Aut) → capote f inv (Am) (Aut) → cofano; (on cooker) → cappa
b. (Am) (fam) → malvivente m/f

hood

(hud) noun
1. a usually loose covering for the whole head, often attached to a coat, cloak etc. The monk pulled his hood over his head.
2. a folding cover on a car, pram etc. Put the hood of the pram up – the baby is getting wet.
3. (American) the bonnet of a car. He raised the hood to look at the engine.
4. a fold of cloth representing a hood, worn by university graduates over their gowns on ceremonial occasions. The professors and lecturers all wore their gowns and hoods for the graduation ceremony.
ˈhooded adjective
fitted with, or wearing, a hood.

hood

غِطَاء مُحَرِّك السيَّارة, قَلُنْسُوَة kapota, kapuce hætte, motorhjelm Kapuze, Motorhaube καπό, κουκούλα capó, capote, capucha huppu, konepelti capot, capuche hauba, kapuljača cappuccio, cofano フード, ボンネット 두건, 보닛 capuchon, motorkap hette, panser kaptur, maska samochodu capô do carro, capuz капот, капюшон huva, motorhuv ฝากระโปรงรถยนต์, หมวกครอบ kapüşon, motor kapağı cốp xe ôtô, mũ trùm đầu 兜帽, 引擎罩
References in classic literature ?
asked Meg, surprised to see, by her hood and cloak, that lazy Amy had been out so early.
She wore her black hood and was bundled up in shawls.
A bust of Beethoven, covered with a hood of dust, scowled at her from the mantelpiece.
The hood of the car was down, and the taste of the air, warmed by the sun, was grateful.
Put on your cloak and hood, or whatever it pleases you to wear
To be sure, he does," said little bustling Ruth, as she took the child, and began taking off a little blue silk hood, and various layers and wrappers of outer garments; and having given a twitch here, and a pull there, and variously adjusted and arranged him, and kissed him heartily, she set him on the floor to collect his thoughts.
Her wilderness is a green wood, her wild man a Robin Hood.
There was a fireplace big enough to camp in; and its projecting sides and hood, of carved and pillared stonework, had the look of a cathedral door.
I was glad to get a facsimile of the letter written by this fine old German Robin Hood, though I was not able to read it.
I am Robin Hood, as thy caitiff carcase soon shall know.
We struck across the big yard, noticing this, that, and t'other thing that was so familiar, and we so glad to see it again, and when we got to the roofed big passageway betwixt the double log house and the kitchen part, there was everything hanging on the wall just as it used to was, even to Uncle Silas's old faded green baize working-gown with the hood to it, and raggedy white patch between the shoulders that always looked like somebody had hit him with a snowball; and then we lifted the latch and walked in.
She was a woman of noble form, and of graceful proportions, having very few equals, and fewer superiors, in personal appearance, among the colored or white women of our neighbor- hood.