hooker


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Related to hooker: Bernhardt, uttermost, Thomasville

hook·er 1

 (ho͝ok′ər)
n.
1. A single-masted fishing smack used off the coast of Ireland.
2. An old worn-out or clumsy ship.

[Dutch hoeker, from Middle Dutch hoeckboot : hoec, fishhook; see keg- in Indo-European roots + boot, boat.]

hook·er 2

 (ho͝ok′ər)
n.
1. One that hooks.
2. Slang A prostitute.
Word History: In his Personal Memoirs Ulysses S. Grant described Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker as "a dangerous man ... not subordinate to his superiors." Hooker had his faults. He may indeed have been insubordinate; he was undoubtedly an erratic leader. But "Fighting Joe" Hooker is often accused of one thing he certainly did not do: he did not give his name to prostitutes. According to a popular story about the origin of the term hooker, the men under Hooker's command during the Civil War were a particularly wild bunch who would spend much of their time in brothels when on leave, and thus prostitutes came to be known as hookers. However, this tale of the origin of hooker cannot be true. The explanation of this highlights a procedure that etymologists often use when trying to evaluate proposed etymologies that relate the origin of a word to a specific historical event or to the name of a historical person: if the word is attested before the event occurred, or before the person lived, then the word cannot have originated with that event or in that person's name. In fact, the word hooker with the sense "prostitute" is recorded before the Civil War. As early as 1845 it is found in North Carolina, as reported in Norman Ellsworth Eliason's Tarheel Talk: An Historical Study of the English Language in North Carolina to 1860, published in 1956. It also appears in the second edition of John Russell Bartlett's Dictionary of Americanisms, published in 1859, where it is defined as "a strumpet, a sailor's trull." Etymologically, it is most likely that hooker is simply "one who hooks or snares clients."

hook·er 3

 (ho͝ok′ər)
n. Slang
A drink of undiluted hard liquor: a hooker of whiskey.

[Probably from the hook-like form of the arm taken in raising a drink to the mouth.]

hooker

(ˈhʊkə)
n
1. (Fishing) a commercial fishing boat using hooks and lines instead of nets
2. (Nautical Terms) a sailing boat of the west of Ireland formerly used for cargo and now for pleasure sailing and racing
[C17: from Dutch hoeker]

hooker

(ˈhʊkə)
n
1. a person or thing that hooks
2. slang
a. a draught of alcoholic drink, esp of spirits
b. a prostitute
3. (Rugby) rugby the central forward in the front row of a scrum whose main job is to hook the ball

Hooker

(ˈhʊkə)
n
1. (Biography) John Lee. 1917–2001, US blues singer and guitarist
2. (Biography) Sir Joseph Dalton. 1817–1911, British botanist; director of Kew Gardens (1865–85)
3. (Biography) Richard. 1554–1600, British theologian, who influenced Anglican theology with The Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity (1593–97)
4. (Biography) Sir William Jackson. 1785–1865, British botanist; first director of Kew Gardens: father of Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker

hook•er1

(ˈhʊk ər)

n.
1. Slang. a prostitute.
2. Slang. a large drink of liquor.
3. a person or thing that hooks.
[1560–70; hook + -er1]

hook•er2

(ˈhʊk ər)

n. Naut.
Slang. any old-fashioned or clumsy vessel.
[1635–45; < Dutch hoeker=hoek hook + -er -er1]

Hook•er

(ˈhʊk ər)

n.
1. Joseph, 1814–79, Union general in the U.S. Civil War.
2. Richard, 1554?–1600, English author and clergyman.
3. Thomas, 1586?–1647, English Puritan: founder of Connecticut.

hooker

The central forward in the front row of the scrum whose main job it is to hook the ball with his heel to a teammate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hooker - United States general in the Union Army who was defeated at Chancellorsville by Robert E. Lee (1814-1879)Hooker - United States general in the Union Army who was defeated at Chancellorsville by Robert E. Lee (1814-1879)
2.hooker - English theologian (1554-1600)Hooker - English theologian (1554-1600)  
3.hooker - a prostitute who attracts customers by walking the streets
bawd, cocotte, cyprian, fancy woman, harlot, lady of pleasure, prostitute, sporting lady, tart, whore, woman of the street, working girl - a woman who engages in sexual intercourse for money
4.hooker - a golfer whose shots typically curve left (for right-handed golfers)
golf player, golfer, linksman - someone who plays the game of golf
5.hooker - (rugby) the player in the middle of the front row of the scrum who tries to capture the ball with the foot
rugby, rugby football, rugger - a form of football played with an oval ball
athlete, jock - a person trained to compete in sports

hooker

noun
Slang. A woman who engages in sexual intercourse for payment:
Slang: moll.
Idioms: lady of easy virtue, lady of pleasure, lady of the night.
Translations
hakker
huoraprostituoitu

hooker

[ˈhʊkəʳ] N
1. (= prostitute) → puta f
2. (Sport) → talonador m

hooker

[ˈhʊkər] n (= prostitute) (mainly US)pute fhook-up [ˈhʊkʌp] n (= connection) → branchement m

hooker

1
n (esp US inf) → Nutte f (inf)

hooker

2
n (Rugby) → Hakler m
References in classic literature ?
Miss Hooker was a-visiting up there to the town --"
She was a-visiting there at Booth's Landing, and just in the edge of the evening she started over with her nigger woman in the horse-ferry to stay all night at her friend's house, Miss What-you-may-call-herQI disremember her name -- and they lost their steering- oar, and swung around and went a-floating down, stern first, about two mile, and saddle-baggsed on the wreck, and the ferryman and the nigger woman and the horses was all lost, but Miss Hooker she made a grab and got aboard the wreck.
Old Jeff Hooker had a bloodhound, and Tom was going to borrow him.
I feel as if I didn't mind how soon I let myself go, and let the blamed hooker knock my brains out if she likes.
It means," said Fisher, "that this man, Hooker Wilson, as soon as he had put his head in at that window, killed his two comrades who had put their heads in at the other windows, by firing across the empty room.
She felt sure that she would have accepted the judicious Hooker, if she had been born in time to save him from that wretched mistake he made in matrimony; or John Milton when his blindness had come on; or any of the other great men whose odd habits it would have been glorious piety to endure; but an amiable handsome baronet, who said "Exactly" to her remarks even when she expressed uncertainty,--how could he affect her as a lover?
I've been on his teetotal hooker four days now, and I'm perishing.
Why, a hundred quid all in beer 'd come pretty close to floatin' this old hooker.
Hooker, who both knew of my work--the latter having read my sketch of 1844--honoured me by thinking it advisable to publish, with Mr.
Hooker, in his great work on the Botany of the Southern Hemisphere.
It was making him crazy, he declared, to lie there in the dark waiting for the blamed hooker to sink.
The crew said they weren't going to Bankok--a hundred and fifty days' passage--in a something hooker that wanted pumping eight hours out of the twenty-four; and the nautical papers inserted again the little para- graph: 'Judea.