hormone


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Related to hormone: plant hormone, growth hormone, thyroid hormone

hor·mone

 (hôr′mōn′)
n.
1.
a. A substance, usually a peptide or steroid, produced by one tissue and conveyed by the bloodstream to another to effect physiological activity, such as growth or metabolism.
b. A synthetic compound that acts like a hormone in the body.
2. Any of various similar substances found in plants and insects that regulate development.

[From Greek hormōn, present participle of hormān, to urge on, from hormē, impulse; see er- in Indo-European roots.]

hor·mon′al (-mō′nəl), hor·mon′ic (-mŏn′ĭk) adj.
hor·mon′al·ly adv.

hormone

(ˈhɔːməʊn)
n
1. (Biochemistry) a chemical substance produced in an endocrine gland and transported in the blood to a certain tissue, on which it exerts a specific effect
2. (Biochemistry) an organic compound produced by a plant that is essential for growth
3. (Biochemistry) any synthetic substance having the same effects
[C20: from Greek hormōn, from horman to stir up, urge on, from hormē impulse, assault]
horˈmonal, hormonic adj
horˈmonally adv
ˈhormoneˌlike adj

hor•mone

(ˈhɔr moʊn)

n.
1. any of various internally secreted compounds formed in endocrine glands that affect the functions of specifically receptive organs or tissues when transported to them by the body fluids.
2. a synthetic substance that acts like such a compound when introduced into the body.
3. any of various plant compounds, as auxin or gibberellin, that control growth and differentiation of plant tissue.
[1900–05; < Greek hormôn, present participle of hormân to set in motion, stimulate, derivative of hormḗ impetus, impulse]
hor•mo′nal, hor•mon•ic (-ˈmɒn ɪk, -ˈmoʊ nɪk) adj.

hor·mone

(hôr′mōn′)
A substance produced in one part of the body, especially in an endocrine gland, that has an effect on another part of the body, to which it is usually carried in the bloodstream. Hormones regulate many biological processes, including growth and metabolism.
Did You Know? On the inside, humans are bathing in a sea of hormones, chemical compounds that regulate many essential activities in the body. A lot of hormones are produced in glands known as endocrine glands, such as the thyroid gland, pancreas, and ovaries, and travel from there through the bloodstream before arriving at their target sites of action. Specialized cells of the nervous system also produce hormones. Hormones are not found only in humans, but also in all other animals and plants. The variety of different functions hormones have is astounding. Insulin, secreted by the pancreas, regulates the absorption of sugars in the body. Thyroid hormones regulate the rate of cell metabolism and affect many other processes, including reproduction. Growth hormone, secreted by the pituitary gland, controls growth of the body. Estrogen and testosterone control sexual development. Some of the hormones released in the brain, known as endorphins, act as natural painkillers. When the amounts of these or other hormones are abnormal, disease can result. Too little insulin causes diabetes, too little estrogen weakens the bones of older women, and too much growth hormone causes people to grow without stopping. Fortunately, these diseases can usually be treated, either with hormones made artificially in laboratories or by operating on the affected gland.

hormone

A chemical messenger that is produced in one part of an organism and acts in another part.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hormone - the secretion of an endocrine gland that is transmitted by the blood to the tissue on which it has a specific effecthormone - the secretion of an endocrine gland that is transmitted by the blood to the tissue on which it has a specific effect
secretion - a functionally specialized substance (especially one that is not a waste) released from a gland or cell
ACTH, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, adrenocorticotrophin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, adrenocorticotropin, corticotrophin, corticotropin - a hormone produced by the anterior pituitary gland that stimulates the adrenal cortex
Adrenalin, adrenaline, epinephrin, epinephrine - a catecholamine secreted by the adrenal medulla in response to stress (trade name Adrenalin); stimulates autonomic nerve action
gastrointestinal hormone, GI hormones - hormones that affect gastrointestinal functioning
glucagon - a hormone secreted by the pancreas; stimulates increases in blood sugar levels in the blood (thus opposing the action of insulin)
gonadotrophic hormone, gonadotrophin, gonadotropic hormone, gonadotropin - hormone secreted by the anterior pituitary gland and placenta; stimulates the gonads and controls reproductive activity
insulin - hormone secreted by the isles of Langerhans in the pancreas; regulates storage of glycogen in the liver and accelerates oxidation of sugar in cells
melatonin - hormone secreted by the pineal gland
neurohormone - a hormone that is released by nerve impulses (e.g., norepinephrine or vasopressin)
oxytocin, Pitocin - hormone secreted by the posterior pituitary gland (trade name Pitocin); stimulates contractions of the uterus and ejection of milk
parathormone, parathyroid hormone - hormone synthesized and released into the blood stream by the parathyroid glands; regulates phosphorus and calcium in the body and functions in neuromuscular excitation and blood clotting
relaxin - hormone secreted by the corpus luteum during the last days of pregnancy; relaxes the pelvic ligaments and prepares the uterus for labor
hypothalamic releasing factor, hypothalamic releasing hormone, releasing factor, releasing hormone, RH - any of several hormones produced in the hypothalamus and carried by a vein to the anterior pituitary gland where they stimulate the release of anterior pituitary hormones; each of these hormones causes the anterior pituitary to secrete a specific hormone
growth hormone, human growth hormone, somatotrophic hormone, somatotrophin, somatotropic hormone, somatotropin, STH - a hormone produced by the anterior pituitary gland; promotes growth in humans
thymosin - hormone secreted by the thymus; stimulates immunological activity of lymphoid tissue
thyroid hormone - any of several closely related compounds that are produced by the thyroid gland and are active metabolically
ADH, antidiuretic hormone, Pitressin, vasopressin - hormone secreted by the posterior pituitary gland (trade name Pitressin) and also by nerve endings in the hypothalamus; affects blood pressure by stimulating capillary muscles and reduces urine flow by affecting reabsorption of water by kidney tubules
sex hormone, steroid hormone, steroid - any hormone affecting the development and growth of sex organs
adrenosterone - a steroid having androgenic activity; obtained from the cortex of the adrenal gland
glucocorticoid - a steroid hormone that is produced by the adrenal cortex of animals; affects functioning of gonads and has anti-inflammatory activity
catecholamine - any of a group of chemicals including epinephrine and norepinephrine that are produced in the medulla of the adrenal gland
melanocyte-stimulating hormone, MSH - a hormone secreted by the anterior pituitary gland that controls the degree of pigmentation in melanocytes
thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyrotrophic hormone, thyrotrophin, thyrotropic hormone, thyrotropin, TSH - anterior pituitary hormone that stimulates the function of the thyroid gland
protirelin, thyrotropin-releasing factor, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRF, TRH - hormone released by the hypothalamus that controls the release of thyroid-stimulating hormone from the anterior pituitary

hormone

Hormones

adrenaline or epinephrine, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, androsterone, antidiuretic hormone, bursicon, calcitonin, cholecystokinin or pancreozymin, chorionic gonadotrophin, corpus luteum hormone or progesterone, corticosteroid, corticosterone or adrenocorticotrophic hormone, cortisone, deoxycorticosterone, ecdysone, enterogastrone, erythropoietin, florigen, follicle-stimulating hormone, glucagon, gibberellic acid, gastrin, gonadotrophin, growth hormone or somatotrophin, insulin, interstitial-cell-stimulating hormone or luteinizing hormone, juvenile hormone, lactogenic hormone, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, luteotrophin or prolactin, noradrenaline, oestradiol, oestriol, oestrone, oxytocin, progesterone, parathyroid hormone, relaxin, secretin, sex hormone, somatomedin, somatostatin, stilboestrol, testosterone, thyroid-stimulating hormone or thyrotropin, thyroxine, trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, triiodothyronine, vasopressin
Translations
هُرمُونهورمون
hormon
hormon
hormoni
hormon
hormon
hormón
ホルモン
호르몬
hormonas
hormons
hormón
hormon
ฮอร์โมน
hóc-môn

hormone

[ˈhɔːməʊn]
A. N (Med) → hormona f
B. CPD hormone replacement therapy Nterapia f hormonal sustitutiva
hormone treatment Ntratamiento m de hormonas

hormone

[ˈhɔːrməʊn]
nhormone f
modif [balance, imbalance, changes, level] → hormonal(e)hormone replacement therapy ntraitement m hormonal substitutif

hormone

nHormon nt

hormone

[ˈhɔːməʊn] normone m

hormone

(ˈhoːməun) noun
a substance produced by certain glands of the body, which makes some organ of the body active. Adrenalin is a hormone.

hormone

هُرمُون hormon hormon Hormon ορμόνη hormona hormoni hormone hormon ormone ホルモン 호르몬 hormoon hormon hormon hormona, hormônio гормон hormon ฮอร์โมน hormon hóc-môn 荷尔蒙

hor·mone

n. hormona, sustancia química natural del cuerpo que produce o estimula la actividad de un órgano;
growth ______ del crecimiento;
___ therapyterapia hormonal;
___ receptorreceptor hormonal;
gonadotropin releasing ______ liberadora de gonadotropina.

hormone

n hormona; adrenocorticotropic — (ACTH) corticotropina, hormona adrenocorticotrópica (HACT); antidiuretic — vasopresina, hormona antidiurética; bovine growth — hormona de crecimiento bovina; follicle-stimulating — (FSH) hormona folículo estimulante (HFE), folitropina; gonadotropin-releasing — (GnRH) hormona liberadora de gonadotropina(s); (human) growth — (GH) hormona de(l) crecimiento (humana); luteinizing — (LH) hormona luteinizante (HL); parathyroid — (PTH) hormona paratiroidea (HPT); thyroid — hormona tiroidea; thyroid-stimulating — (TSH) hormona estimulante del or de la tiroides, tirotropina
References in periodicals archive ?
com/research/35c38b/global_peptide) has announced the addition of the "Global Peptide Hormone Market & Pipeline Analysis " report to their offering.
While the jury is still out on the safety of any hormone therapy, it looks like low doses of bioidentical hormones are safer than traditional synthetic hormones.
It is possible that the first sex hormone hit the market around 1900: the androgen (male) hormone testosterone, extracted from bull testicles.
The first step is to have your blood tested using Life Extension's Female Hormone Blood Panel.
With Graves' disease, your immune system stimulates your thyroid cells to make too much thyroid hormone.
Human growth hormone has substantial risks and no functional benefits for healthy, elderly people, according to a comprehensive review.
Women know that the earlier claims for menopause hormone therapy (HT) have been disproven and that HT leads to an increased risk of stroke, blood clots, and breast cancer (see related article in this issue).
Yet even on the far side of this healing adventure, it took me awhile to understand how hormone imbalance, the environment and our inner ecology are inextricably linked--and how I'd unwittingly contributed to my illness.
A hormone that sharply reduces appetite, which researchers at Stanford University discovered last month, caused laboratory mice to eat half as much as usual.
Department of Defense and the first of four Phase 2 studies planned for OGX- 011 in 2005, is designed to assess the safety and efficacy of OGX-011 in prostate cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant hormone therapy.
There is a long history of clinical use of perchlorate as a pharmacologic inhibitor of thyroid hormone synthesis (Hobson 1961; Wolff 1998).
One hormone group, known as anabolic steroids, affect muscle growth and control male characteristics.