horology

(redirected from horologists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ho·rol·o·gy

 (hə-rŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The science of measuring time.
2. The art of making timepieces.

[Greek hōrā, hour, season; see yēr- in Indo-European roots + -logy.]

horology

(hɒˈrɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Horology) the art or science of making timepieces or of measuring time
horologic, ˌhoroˈlogical adj

ho•rol•o•gy

(hɔˈrɒl ə dʒi, hoʊ-)

n.
the art or science of making timepieces or of measuring time.
[1810–20; see horologe, -logy]

ho·rol·o·gy

(hô-rŏl′ə-jē)
The science of measuring time.

horology

the art or science of making timepieces or of measuring time. — horologist, n.horological, adj.
See also: Time

horology

The art or practice of making clocks and watches, or the study of time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.horology - the art of designing and making clockshorology - the art of designing and making clocks
artistry, prowess, art - a superior skill that you can learn by study and practice and observation; "the art of conversation"; "it's quite an art"
Translations

horology

[hɒˈrɒlədʒɪ] Nhorología f

horology

n (measuring time) → Zeitmessung f; (= watchmaking)Uhrmacherkunst f
References in periodicals archive ?
Unique to Silicon Valley where smart watches are the norm, the mechanical complexity of luxury timepieces will take their horologists a full day to complete the shift to standard time throughout the store.
These horologists prefer clocking vibrating cesium atoms, carefully noting a resonance frequency that is accurate to one second in 20 million years.
He was the last in a centuries-long line of English horologists stretching back before John Harrison of Wakefield, who revolutionised sea travel by inventing the marine chronometer in 1761.
The book is aimed at clockmakers and horologists, bell enthusiasts, and general readers.
Master horologists at Montega, considering watchmaking an art, ensure that each piece passes through a rigorous design process keeping in view the latest technological development and quality control in mind.
Horologists at the museum believe the picture "may well be the oldest to show a true watch".
The challenge facing 15th-century horologists was how to make a power equalising device that would make the momentum exerted on the escapement constant, regardless of the state of winding.
Presenting three architects with this gargantuan task of commenting on the city seemed akin to giving three horologists the sun, and telling them to carefully pick it apart.