horse opera

(redirected from horse operas)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

horse opera

n.
A film or other theatrical work about the American West; a western.

horse opera

n
(Film) informal another term for Western4

west•ern

(ˈwɛs tərn)

adj.
1. lying toward or situated in the west.
2. directed or proceeding toward the west: a western migration.
3. coming or originating from the west, as a wind.
4. (often cap.) of or pertaining to the West in the U.S.
5. (usu. cap.) Occidental.
6. (usu. cap.) of or pertaining to the non-Communist countries of Europe and the Americas.
7. (cap.) of or pertaining to the Western Church.
n.
8. (often cap.) a story, movie, or radio or television play about the U.S. West of the 19th century.
9. a person or thing from a western region or country.
[before 1050; Middle English, Old English westerne; see west, -ern]

horse opera

- A slang term for a western (movie).
See also related terms for movie.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.horse opera - a film about life in the western United States during the period of exploration and developmenthorse opera - a film about life in the western United States during the period of exploration and development
feature film, feature - the principal (full-length) film in a program at a movie theater; "the feature tonight is `Casablanca'"
spaghetti Western - a low-budget Western movie produced by a European (especially an Italian) film company
Translations

horse opera

n (hum) → western m inv
References in periodicals archive ?
The weakness is that for those who have already read numerous classic horse operas it is noticeable that this is a copy--a very good copy but a copy.
Kevin Costner and Kevin Kline shine in the first of the former's horse operas.
It is topnotch when compared to other contemporary horse operas but falls a bit short when compared to the original pulps.
In addition, the laconic storytelling yields an undercurrent of humor that one does not normally see in horse operas.
He'd worked for all the Poverty Row producers, the companies who made B Westerns, serials, the horse operas, and Saturday matinee fare.
Then came a moment reminiscent of all those Hollywood horse operas where, to thunderous cheers, the US Cavalry rides in for a last-minute rescue.
On top of this, TV networks in the '50s produced a glut of horse operas, filling their programming schedules with frontier tales of marshals ("Gunsmoke"), ranchers ("Bonanza"), gunslingers ("Have Gun, Will Travel"), and covered wagons ("Wagon Train").