horsecar


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horsecar

(ˈhɔːskɑː)
n
a public transport vehicle drawn by a horse

horse•car

(ˈhɔrsˌkɑr)

n.
1. a streetcar drawn by a horse or horses.
2. a railroad car or a truck for transporting horses.
[1825–35, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.horsecar - an early form of streetcar that was drawn by horses
streetcar, trolley, trolley car, tramcar, tram - a wheeled vehicle that runs on rails and is propelled by electricity
References in classic literature ?
They soon found themselves in Montgomery Street, where a great crowd was collected; the side-walks, street, horsecar rails, the shop-doors, the windows of the houses, and even the roofs, were full of people.
Two input prices are employed, the daily wage of horsecar drivers (standardized to a 10 hour day), and the per bushel price of oats (horse feed).
During these trips, members often travelled by 'wagonette' --a small horsecar with springs and a wooden, bench-type seat--or by motor omnibus, an early version of modern buses.
His social life revolved around his friendships with Peter Doyle, a horsecar conductor who may have been his lover; Charley Eldridge, his former publisher (1860 Leaves of Grass) and a Treasury Department attorney; naturalist John Burroughs and his wife Ursula; and writer and Federal clerk William O'Connor and his wife Ellen, abolitionists and advocates for the rights of freedmen and champions of Whitman's poems.
A part of the anniversary was the publication of a 48-page book, written by Stephen Carlson and Tom Harding, which traces the history, in word and photos, of transportation in the Worcester area from the early horsecar days to the end at 1.
The authors note, "It]he horsecar clearly transformed the meaning of urban space and advanced the process by which the compact walking city became the extended network city" (p.
Let the expression be the least thing in the world--speaking genially to one's aunt, or giving up one's seat in a horsecar, if nothing more heroic offers--but let it not fail to take place" (63).
The index is only six pages and gives access largely by location, though a few topical terms appear: horsecar, lighting, brakes, cable railways.
is reported to have said, "a crowded Cambridge horsecar is the
century with the introduction of the horsecar railway, which allowed
Don't miss the horsecar fide by moonlight, the sunset on Glacier 3000.
On "the guano-encrusted crags of Seal Rocks, a family of sea lions" captures Sam's attention but just behind him a posh eatery patronized by "elegantly dressed clientele" is doing "great business for a place so far outside the city, no bus or horsecar lines remotely near" (pp.