hostage


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hos·tage

 (hŏs′tĭj)
n.
1. A person held by one party in a conflict as security that specified terms will be met by the opposing party.
2. One that serves as security against an implied threat: superpowers held hostage to each other by their nuclear arsenals.
3. One that is under the constraining control of another: "In becoming a mother one becomes a hostage to fortune" (Janna Malamud Smith).

[Middle English, from Old French, probably from host, guest, host; see host1.]

hostage

(ˈhɒstɪdʒ)
n
1. a person given to or held by a person, organization, etc, as a security or pledge or for ransom, release, exchange for prisoners, etc
2. the state of being held as a hostage
3. any security or pledge
4. give hostages to fortune to place oneself in a position in which misfortune may strike through the loss of what one values most
[C13: from Old French, from hoste guest, host1]

hos•tage

(ˈhɒs tɪdʒ)

n.
1. a person given or held as security for the fulfillment of certain conditions or terms, promises, etc., by another.
2. Archaic. a security or pledge.
[1225–75; Middle English < Old French hostage]

hostage

- First referred to the state of someone handed over as a pledge or security (for the fulfillment of an undertaking).
See also related terms for security.

hostage

A person held as a pledge that certain terms or agreements will be kept. (The taking of hostages is forbidden under the Geneva Conventions, 1949.)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hostage - a prisoner who is held by one party to insure that another party will meet specified termshostage - a prisoner who is held by one party to insure that another party will meet specified terms
captive, prisoner - a person who is confined; especially a prisoner of war

hostage

noun captive, prisoner, pledge, pawn, security, surety the man they were holding as a hostage
Translations
رَهِينَةٌرَهينَه
rukojmí
gidsel
panttivanki
talac
túsz
hostageostage
gísl
人質
인질
įkaitaslaikyti įkaitupaimti įkaitu
ķīlnieks
rukojemník
talec
gisslan
ตัวประกัน
con tin

hostage

[ˈhɒstɪdʒ] Nrehén mf
to take sb hostagetomar or (LAm) agarrar a algn como rehén

hostage

[ˈhɒstɪdʒ] notage m
to take sb hostage → prendre qn en otage
to be taken hostage → être pris(e) en otage
to be held hostage → être retenu(e) en otagehost computer nordinateur m hôtehost country n
[conference, sports event] → pays m d'accueil
[immigrant] → pays m d'accueil

hostage

nGeisel f; to take/hold somebody hostagejdn als Geisel nehmen/halten; to take hostagesGeiseln nehmen

hostage

:
hostage-taker
nGeiselnehmer(in) m(f)
hostage-taking
nGeiselnahme f

hostage

[ˈhɒstɪdʒ] nostaggio
to take sb hostage → prendere qn in ostaggio

hostage

(ˈhostidʒ) noun
a person who is held prisoner in order to ensure that the captor's demands etc will be carried out. The terrorists took three people with them as hostages; They took / were holding three people hostage.
take/hold (someone) hostage
to take or keep (someone) as a hostage. The police were unable to attack the terrorists because they were holding three people hostage.

hostage

رَهِينَةٌ rukojmí gidsel Geisel όμηρος rehén panttivanki otage talac ostaggio 人質 인질 gijzelaar gissel zakładnik refém заложник gisslan ตัวประกัน rehine con tin 人质
References in classic literature ?
But there is, and not so long till then; and we'll see who'll be glad to have a hostage when it comes to that.
Off he went wid that fit in his little head an' a dose of fever, an nothin' would suit but givin' you the dog as a hostage.
With her as hostage I could force acquiescence to my every demand.
In the monarchy of Great Britain, it furnishes a substitute for the prohibited responsibility of the chief magistrate, which serves in some degree as a hostage to the national justice for his good behavior.
The great emporium of its commerce, the great reservoir of its wealth, lies every moment at the mercy of events, and may almost be regarded as a hostage for ignominious compliances with the dictates of a foreign enemy, or even with the rapacious demands of pirates and barbarians.
I say that she is a hostage for the Parisians," answered the cardinal.
They would, they said, send an escort of Sagoths with me to fetch the precious document from its hiding-place, keeping Dian at Phutra as a hostage and releasing us both the moment that the document was safely restored to their queen.
Then ye may not do better, good folk, than gather and hear the tale I have to tell, sith it concerneth you, forasmuch as ye go to find that ye will not find, and seek that ye will seek in vain, my life being hostage for my word, and my word and message being these, namely: That a hap has happened where- of the like has not been seen no more but once this two hundred years, which was the first and last time that that said misfortune strake the holy valley in that form by commandment of the Most High whereto by reasons just and causes thereunto contributing, wherein the matter --"
HE THAT hath wife and children hath given hostages to fortune; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief.
However, that we might be very secure, I told him he should go back again and choose out those five, and tell them, that they might see he did not want men, that he would take out those five to be his assistants, and that the governor would keep the other two, and the three that were sent prisoners to the castle (my cave), as hostages for the fidelity of those five; and that if they proved unfaithful in the execution, the five hostages should be hanged in chains alive on the shore.
It is not difficult to stand above the conventions when we leave no hostages among them; men can always be more unconventional than women, and a bachelor of independent means need encounter no difficulties at all.
I dressed myself like a merchant, and in that habit received the four captains of gelves which the chec sent to compliment me, and ordered to stay as hostages, whom I sent back, that I might gain upon their affections by the confidence I placed in their sincerity; this had so good an effect, that the chec, who was transported with the account the officers gave of the civilities they had been treated with, came in an hour to visit me, bringing with him a Portuguese, whom I had sent ashore as a security for his return.