hostess


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host·ess

 (hō′stĭs)
n.
1. A woman who receives or entertains guests in a social or official capacity.
2. A woman who manages an inn or hotel.
3. A woman who is the emcee or interviewer on a radio or television program.
4. A woman who is employed to greet and assist patrons, as in a restaurant.
5. A woman who is employed to dance with customers in a dance hall or nightclub. See Usage Note at -ess.

hostess

(ˈhəʊstɪs)
n
1. a woman acting as host
2. a woman who receives and entertains patrons of a club, restaurant, etc
3. (Aeronautics) See air hostess

host•ess

(ˈhoʊ stɪs)
n.
1. a woman who entertains guests in her own home or elsewhere.
2. a woman employed in a restaurant or the like to seat patrons.
3. a woman who acts as emcee, moderator, or interviewer for a television or radio program; host.
4. a woman employed by an airline or other carrier to see that passengers are comfortable throughout a trip.
5. a woman who manages a resort or hotel or who directs its social activities.
v.t.
7. to be or serve as hostess to or at.
v.i.
8. to perform the duties or functions of a hostess.
[1250–1300; < Old French]
usage: See -ess.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hostess - a woman hosthostess - a woman host        
host - a person who invites guests to a social event (such as a party in his or her own home) and who is responsible for them while they are there
2.hostess - a woman innkeeper
innkeeper, boniface, host - the owner or manager of an inn
3.hostess - a woman steward on an airplanehostess - a woman steward on an airplane  
flight attendant, steward - an attendant on an airplane
Translations
værtinde
gostiteljicastevardesa

hostess

[ˈhəʊstes] Nhuéspeda f, anfitriona f; (in night club) → azafata f (Aer) → azafata f

hostess

[ˈhəʊstəs] n
[guest] → hôtesse f
(= flight attendant) → hôtesse f de l'air
(in nightclub)entraîneuse fhostess trolley n (British)table f roulante chauffantehost family n [foreign student] → famille f d'accueil

hostess

n
(person) → Gastgeberin f; (in own home) → Hausherrin f, → Gastgeberin f; to be or play hostess to somebodyjds Gastgeberin sein; (in own home also) → jdn zu Besuch or Gast haben
(in hotel etc) → Wirtin f
(in nightclub) → Hostess f
(= air hostess)Stewardess f; (at exhibition etc) → Hostess f
(on TV programme etc) → Gastgeberin f

hostess

[ˈhəʊstɛs] nospite f (Aer) → hostess f inv; (in nightclub) → entraîneuse f inv
References in classic literature ?
The parlor windows were closed and curtained, no picture of the pretty wife sewing on the piazza, in white, with a distracting little bow in her hair, or a bright-eyed hostess, smiling a shy welcome as she greeted her guest.
My hostess put the lamp on a stand in the corner, and turned it low because of the heat.
He observed his hostess attentively from under his shaggy brows, and noted a subtle change which had transformed her from the listless woman he had known into a being who, for the moment, seemed palpitant with the forces of life.
Before Christie opened the door her face underwent a rapid transformation: the gentle glow of a refined woman's welcome suddenly beamed in her interested eyes; the impulsive courtesy of an expectant hostess eagerly seizing a long- looked-for opportunity broke in a smile upon her lips as she swept across the room, and stopped with her two white outstretched hands before Whiskey Dick.
Not less evident was this love and necessity for the Beautiful, in the instinctive caution with which, even so soon, his eyes turned away from his hostess, and wandered to any quarter rather than come back.
The hostess, who was busy in various fizzing and stewing operations over the fire, preparatory to the evening meal, stopped, with a fork in her hand, as Eliza's sweet and plaintive voice arrested her.
He had scarcely greeted his hostess when he said: "Miss Maxwell, doesn't it strike you that our friend Rebecca looks wretchedly tired?
She began, however, seriously to turn her thoughts towards its accomplishment, and had already mentioned their wishes to their kind hostess, who resisted them with all the eloquence of her good-will, when a plan was suggested, which, though detaining them from home yet a few weeks longer, appeared to Elinor altogether much more eligible than any other.
We feasted that evening as on nectar and ambrosia; and not the least delight of the entertainment was the smile of gratification with which our hostess regarded us, as we satisfied our famished appetites on the delicate fare she liberally supplied.
They are not mine,' said the amiable hostess, more repellingly than Heathcliff himself could have replied.
Like a host and hostess at a reception, the poor novelist has to pretend to be interested in everybody,--in the dull as in the brilliant, in the bore as in the beauty.
A faint sketch of the lines Time intended to engrave on Gertrude's brow appeared there as she read the letter; but she hastened to give the admiral's kind regards to her host and hostess, and discussed her mother's health feelingly with them.