hot air


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hot air

n. Slang
Empty, exaggerated talk.

hot air

n
informal empty and usually boastful talk

hot′ air′


n.
Informal.
empty or exaggerated talk or writing.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hot air - air that has been heated and tends to risehot air - air that has been heated and tends to rise
air - a mixture of gases (especially oxygen) required for breathing; the stuff that the wind consists of; "air pollution"; "a smell of chemicals in the air"; "open a window and let in some air"; "I need some fresh air"
2.hot air - loud and confused and empty talk; "mere rhetoric"
hokum, meaninglessness, nonsense, nonsensicality, bunk - a message that seems to convey no meaning

hot air

noun empty talk, rant, guff (slang), bombast, wind, gas (informal), verbiage, claptrap (informal), blather, bunkum (chiefly U.S.), blether, bosh (informal), tall talk (informal) His justification for the merger was just hot air.
Translations
كلام فارِغ، هُراء
kecy
אוויר חםדברי הבל
üres beszéd
innantómt blaîur
atmasyonboş lâf

hot air

n (fam, pej) → ciance fpl

hot

(hot) adjective
1. having or causing a great deal of heat. a hot oven; That water is hot.
2. very warm. a hot day; Running makes me feel hot.
3. (of food) having a sharp, burning taste. a hot curry.
4. easily made angry. a hot temper.
5. recent; fresh. hot news.
ˈhotly adverb
1. eagerly; quickly. The thieves were hotly pursued by the police.
2. angrily; passionately. The accusations were hotly denied.
hot air
boastful words, promises that will not be kept etc. Most of what he said was just hot air.
ˌhot-ˈblooded adjective
passionate; having strong feelings. hot-blooded young men.
hot dog
a hot sausage sandwich.
ˈhotfoot adverb
in a great hurry. He arrived hotfoot from the meeting.
ˈhothead noun
a hotheaded person.
ˌhotˈheaded adjective
easily made angry; inclined to act suddenly and without sufficient thought.
ˈhothouse noun
a glass-house kept warm for growing plants in. He grows orchids in his hothouse.
ˈhot-plate noun
1. the part of a cooker on which food is heated for cooking.
2. a portable heated plate of metal etc for keeping plates of food etc hot.
be in hot water, get into hot water
to be in or get into trouble.
hot uppast tense, past participle ˈhotted verb
to increase; to become more exciting etc.
in hot pursuit
chasing as fast as one can. The thief ran off, with the shopkeeper in hot pursuit.
like hot cakes
very quickly. These books are selling like hot cakes.
References in classic literature ?
Hot air isn't as good as gas, for if the air should get cold the balloon would come down in the desert, and we should be lost.
It takes but a little while to inflate a balloon with hot air.
The previous evening each furnace had been charged with 114,000 pounds weight of metal in bars disposed cross-ways to each other, so as to allow the hot air to circulate freely between them.
If yer does know him, and he's on de square, w'y I'll spiel yer de bunch of hot air he sent yer.
Look at your brother, a-runnin' around to socialist meetin's, an' chewin' hot air, an' diggin' up extra strike dues to the union that means so much bread out of the mouths of his children, instead of makin' good with his bosses.
Meanwhile Ventvogel was lifting his snub nose, and sniffing the hot air for all the world like an old Impala ram who scents danger.
And he gulped down a breath of hot air that nearly made him faint.
For a moment also the soldiers looked on each other in doubt, for the fire raged furiously, and spouts of flame shot high toward the heaven, and above it and about it the hot air danced.
It is insufferably close; and you see the hot air fluttering between yourself and any other object you may happen to look at, like the ghost of smoke.
Then Ripple sank down on the burning floor, and felt that her life was nearly done; for she well knew the hot air of the fire-palace would be death to her.
A terrific gale sprang up after I had started, and the journey both by sea and land was full of horrors, the trains in Germany being heated to such an extent that it is next to impossible to sit still, great gusts of hot air coming up under the cushions, the cushions themselves being very hot, and the wretched traveller still hotter.
The hot air danced across it, making it impossible to see the roofs of a village on the plain distinctly.