hot spot


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hot spot

or hot·spot  (hŏt′spŏt′)
n.
1. An area in which there is dangerous unrest or hostile action: "opportunities ... for United Nations forces to play a constructive role in some of the world's hot spots" (Paul Lewis).
2. Informal A lively and popular place, such as a nightclub.
3. An area of intense heat, radiation, or activity.
4. A location where Wi-Fi is publicly available.

hot spot

or

hotspot

n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an area of potential violence or political unrest
2. a lively nightclub or other place of entertainment
3. an area of great activity of a specific type: the world's economic hot spots.
4. (Automotive Engineering)
a. any local area of high temperature in a part of an engine, etc
b. part of the inlet manifold of a paraffin engine that is heated by exhaust gases to vaporize the fuel
5. (Computer Science) computing a place where wireless internet, esp broadband, services are provided to users of portable computers through a wireless local area network, such as in an airport, railway station, or library
6. (Pathology) med
a. a small area on the surface of or within a body with an exceptionally high concentration of radioactivity or of some chemical or mineral considered harmful
b. a similar area that generates an abnormal amount of heat, as revealed by thermography
7. (Genetics) genetics a part of a chromosome that has a tendency for mutation or recombination

hot′ spot`

or hot′spot`,


n.
1. a country or region where dangerous or difficult political situations exist or may develop.
2. any area or place of known danger, instability, etc.
3. Informal. a nightclub.
4. a chromosome site or a section of DNA having a high frequency of mutation.
[1925–30, Amer.]

hot spot

(hŏt)
A volcanic area, usually 60 to 120 miles (97 to 193 kilometers) across, believed to lie above a rising plume of hot magma within the Earth. The source of the heat is thought to be the decay of radioactive elements deep within the Earth. The Hawaiian Islands are believed to have formed as the result of a tectonic plate moving over a hot spot. See more at tectonic boundary.

hot spot

Region in a contaminated area in which the level of radioactive contamination is considerably greater than in neighboring regions in the area.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hot spot - a place of political unrest and potential violence; "the United States cannot police all of the world's hot spots"
2.hot spot - a point of relatively intense heat or radiation
point - the precise location of something; a spatially limited location; "she walked to a point where she could survey the whole street"
3.hot spot - a lively entertainment spot
spot - a business establishment for entertainment; "night spot"

hot spot

noun
A difficult, often embarrassing situation or condition:
Informal: bind, pickle, spot.
Translations
zone d'accès sans fil

hot spot

n (fig) → zona calda
References in periodicals archive ?
uk, Strauss believes Hot Spot is not reliable enough to be used in the Decision Review System.
In the current study, the team showed that manipulating the hot spot "selectively interferes with what beta-gamma does," says Smrcka.
Two sets of primers were designed to amplify the hot spot regions.
DIRECWAY Wi-Fi Access is a complete, managed Hot Spot solution that can turn any retail location into an Internet connection destination, encouraging repeat visits, attracting new patrons and extending peak hours," explained James Gandolfi, senior vice president and general manager, HNS San Diego.
The DBA's job quickly turned to spending most of the time identifying, isolating and eliminating these hot spots, sometimes hundreds of hours to eliminate just one.
Staggering sections minimizes hot spot effects, thus eliminating weakness and reducing distortion.
Moore's fortune is being spent on a crusade to save so-called global hot spots, 25 of the most threatened natural places on earth.
7 An area that provides cover and concealment represents a favorable hot spot, whereas a well-lit, heavily patrolled area would prove a poor choice for criminal activity.
The researchers report finding strong evidence linking the ULVZ to the position of hot spots.
Following an explanation of the structural hot spot stress, its definition and its relevance to fatigue, the authors describe methods for its determination.
Gilliland of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore suggest two explanations for the hot spot on Betelgeuse.