hotfoot


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hot·foot

 (hŏt′fo͝ot′)
intr.v. hot·foot·ed, hot·foot·ing, hot·foots Informal
To go in haste. Often used with it: hotfoot it out of town.
adv.
In haste.
n. pl. hot·foots
The practical joke of lighting a match that has been secretly inserted between the sole and upper of a victim's shoe.

hotfoot

(ˈhɒtˌfʊt)
adv
with all possible speed; quickly
vb
to move quickly

hot•foot

(ˈhɒtˌfʊt)

n., pl. -foots, n.
1. a practical joke in which a match is inserted surreptitiously in the victim's shoe and then lighted.
v.i.
2. to go in great haste (often fol. by it): to hotfoot it to the bank.
adv.
3. in haste: to run hotfoot to class.

hotfoot


Past participle: hotfooted
Gerund: hotfooting

Imperative
hotfoot
hotfoot
Present
I hotfoot
you hotfoot
he/she/it hotfoots
we hotfoot
you hotfoot
they hotfoot
Preterite
I hotfooted
you hotfooted
he/she/it hotfooted
we hotfooted
you hotfooted
they hotfooted
Present Continuous
I am hotfooting
you are hotfooting
he/she/it is hotfooting
we are hotfooting
you are hotfooting
they are hotfooting
Present Perfect
I have hotfooted
you have hotfooted
he/she/it has hotfooted
we have hotfooted
you have hotfooted
they have hotfooted
Past Continuous
I was hotfooting
you were hotfooting
he/she/it was hotfooting
we were hotfooting
you were hotfooting
they were hotfooting
Past Perfect
I had hotfooted
you had hotfooted
he/she/it had hotfooted
we had hotfooted
you had hotfooted
they had hotfooted
Future
I will hotfoot
you will hotfoot
he/she/it will hotfoot
we will hotfoot
you will hotfoot
they will hotfoot
Future Perfect
I will have hotfooted
you will have hotfooted
he/she/it will have hotfooted
we will have hotfooted
you will have hotfooted
they will have hotfooted
Future Continuous
I will be hotfooting
you will be hotfooting
he/she/it will be hotfooting
we will be hotfooting
you will be hotfooting
they will be hotfooting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hotfooting
you have been hotfooting
he/she/it has been hotfooting
we have been hotfooting
you have been hotfooting
they have been hotfooting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hotfooting
you will have been hotfooting
he/she/it will have been hotfooting
we will have been hotfooting
you will have been hotfooting
they will have been hotfooting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hotfooting
you had been hotfooting
he/she/it had been hotfooting
we had been hotfooting
you had been hotfooting
they had been hotfooting
Conditional
I would hotfoot
you would hotfoot
he/she/it would hotfoot
we would hotfoot
you would hotfoot
they would hotfoot
Past Conditional
I would have hotfooted
you would have hotfooted
he/she/it would have hotfooted
we would have hotfooted
you would have hotfooted
they would have hotfooted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hotfoot - a practical joke that involves inserting a match surreptitiously between the sole and upper of the victim's shoe and then lighting it
practical joke - a prank or trick played on a person (especially one intended to make the victim appear foolish)
Verb1.hotfoot - move fasthotfoot - move fast; "He rushed down the hall to receive his guests"; "The cars raced down the street"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
barge, push forward, thrust ahead - push one's way; "she barged into the meeting room"
shoot down, tear, buck, charge, shoot - move quickly and violently; "The car tore down the street"; "He came charging into my office"
dash, scoot, scud, dart, flash, shoot - run or move very quickly or hastily; "She dashed into the yard"
Adv.1.hotfoot - without delay; speedily; "sent ambassadors hotfoot to the Turks"- Francis Hackett; "drove hotfoot for Boston"

hotfoot

hot-foot
adverb speedily, quickly, hastily, hurriedly, helter-skelter, pell-mell, posthaste Today's harassed hostess arrives hotfoot from the office.

hotfoot

verb
1. Informal. To leave hastily:
Informal: clear out, get, skedaddle.
Idioms: beat it, hightail it, hotfoot it , make tracks.
2. Informal. To move swiftly:
Informal: rip.
Slang: barrel, highball.
Chiefly British: nip.
Translations
بِسُرْعَه
kvapem
med benene på nakken
í snarhasti
aceleyletelâşla

hotfoot

[ˈhɒtˈfʊt]
A. ADVa toda prisa
B. VT to hotfoot itir volando

hotfoot

[ˈhɒtˌfʊt] advdi gran carriera

hot

(hot) adjective
1. having or causing a great deal of heat. a hot oven; That water is hot.
2. very warm. a hot day; Running makes me feel hot.
3. (of food) having a sharp, burning taste. a hot curry.
4. easily made angry. a hot temper.
5. recent; fresh. hot news.
ˈhotly adverb
1. eagerly; quickly. The thieves were hotly pursued by the police.
2. angrily; passionately. The accusations were hotly denied.
hot air
boastful words, promises that will not be kept etc. Most of what he said was just hot air.
ˌhot-ˈblooded adjective
passionate; having strong feelings. hot-blooded young men.
hot dog
a hot sausage sandwich.
ˈhotfoot adverb
in a great hurry. He arrived hotfoot from the meeting.
ˈhothead noun
a hotheaded person.
ˌhotˈheaded adjective
easily made angry; inclined to act suddenly and without sufficient thought.
ˈhothouse noun
a glass-house kept warm for growing plants in. He grows orchids in his hothouse.
ˈhot-plate noun
1. the part of a cooker on which food is heated for cooking.
2. a portable heated plate of metal etc for keeping plates of food etc hot.
be in hot water, get into hot water
to be in or get into trouble.
hot uppast tense, past participle ˈhotted verb
to increase; to become more exciting etc.
in hot pursuit
chasing as fast as one can. The thief ran off, with the shopkeeper in hot pursuit.
like hot cakes
very quickly. These books are selling like hot cakes.
References in classic literature ?
Buffalo Bill has been ambushed and badly shot this side of Clayton, and Thorndike the scout, too; Bill couldn't travel, but Thorndike could, and he brought the news, and Sergeant Wilkes and six men of Company B are gone, two hours ago, hotfoot, to get Bill.
Big Toomai had come up hotfoot from the camp in the plains to search for his son and his elephant, and now that he had found them he looked at them as though he were afraid of them both.
28pm: 9-4 Crosskeys Razor 5-2 Blink De Bookies 5-2 Seanis Strike 4 Moyar Okee 10 Hillcross Zeus 16 Hotfoot Lorrimer
ALGARVE (7nts, b/b) until Oct 20, Gatwick or Luton, pounds 329, Voyana (0871 271 5207); ORLANDO (7nts, s/c) Nov 1-28, Gatwick, pounds 399, Hotfoot Holidays (0871 222 5823); GAMBIA (7nts, s/c) Nov 18, Gatwick, pounds 369, Future Travel (01752 779 102).
The gig takes place at the Burnt Post Folk Club on Kenpas Highway, where Sean will arrive hotfoot from a Dubliners tour of Austria.
Words like "sweet" and "quite proud" don't exactly make you want to hotfoot it down to the Odeon.
Nasdaq:DGLV), today announced availability of HotFoot Host(TM) Enterprise and HotFoot Host(TM) Software Development Kit (SDK) -- two new offerings, which allow clients to store, manage and deliver HotFoot(TM) for PowerPoint(R) presentations behind their corporate firewall.
TIME once more to hotfoot it to Hope Street for the annual midsummer festivities.
Meanwhile, Wrexham's Ian Houston was again in winning form in the Hotfoot up Famau hill race from Llanbedr DC, the second race in the Clwydian Hill midweek series.
Taxation magazine editor, Mike Truman said: 'Charles may be forced to suggest that they hotfoot it to Asda to buy a copy of the ring for a fraction of the value at pounds 19.
HOLLYWOOD stars Brad Pitt and Matt Damon had to hotfoot it out of a London hotel yesterday after a fire broke out in Gordon Ramsay's restaurant.