hothouse


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hot·house

 (hŏt′hous′)
n.
1. A heated greenhouse for plants that require an even, relatively warm temperature.
2. An environment conducive to vigorous growth or development; a hotbed: "With its mix of African, Latin, European, and pan-American influences, the Caribbean is truly a musical hothouse" (New Yorker).
adj.
1. Grown in a hothouse: a hothouse orchid.
2. Delicate and sensitive, as if from being grown in a hothouse.
tr.v. hot·housed, hot·hous·ing, hot·hous·es
To cultivate in a hothouse.

hothouse

(ˈhɒtˌhaʊs)
n
1. (Botany)
a. a greenhouse in which the temperature is maintained at a fixed level above that of the surroundings
b. (as modifier): a hothouse plant.
2.
a. an environment that encourages rapid development
b. (as modifier): a hot-house atmosphere.
3. an environment where there is great pressure: showjumping is a tough, hothouse world.
4. (modifier) informal often censorious sensitive or delicate: a hothouse temperament.

hot•house

(ˈhɒtˌhaʊs)

n., pl. -hous•es (-ˌhaʊ zɪz)

adj., v. -housed, hous•ing. n.
1. an artificially heated greenhouse for the cultivation of tender plants.
2. a place favoring rapid growth; hotbed.
3. Obs. a brothel.
adj.
4. of or pertaining to a plant grown in, or capable of being grown only in, a hothouse.
5. overprotected, artificial, or unnaturally delicate.
v.t.
6. to cultivate in a hothouse.
7. to educate (children) at an unusually early age.
[1505–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hothouse - a greenhouse in which plants are arranged in a pleasing mannerhothouse - a greenhouse in which plants are arranged in a pleasing manner
glasshouse, greenhouse, nursery - a building with glass walls and roof; for the cultivation and exhibition of plants under controlled conditions

hothouse

noun greenhouse, conservatory, glasshouse, orangery Wilted plants thrive when well tended in a hothouse.
Translations
pařeništěskleník
drivhus
gróîurhús

hothouse

[ˈhɒthaʊs] N (hothouses (pl)) [ˈhɒthaʊzɪz]invernadero m

hothouse

[ˈhɒthaʊs]
n
(= greenhouse) → serre f chaude
(fig) [ideas, activity] → foyer m
modif
[flowers] → de serre chaude
(fig) [atmosphere] → fébrilehot key nraccourci m clavier

hothouse

[ˈhɒtˌhaʊs] nserra

hot

(hot) adjective
1. having or causing a great deal of heat. a hot oven; That water is hot.
2. very warm. a hot day; Running makes me feel hot.
3. (of food) having a sharp, burning taste. a hot curry.
4. easily made angry. a hot temper.
5. recent; fresh. hot news.
ˈhotly adverb
1. eagerly; quickly. The thieves were hotly pursued by the police.
2. angrily; passionately. The accusations were hotly denied.
hot air
boastful words, promises that will not be kept etc. Most of what he said was just hot air.
ˌhot-ˈblooded adjective
passionate; having strong feelings. hot-blooded young men.
hot dog
a hot sausage sandwich.
ˈhotfoot adverb
in a great hurry. He arrived hotfoot from the meeting.
ˈhothead noun
a hotheaded person.
ˌhotˈheaded adjective
easily made angry; inclined to act suddenly and without sufficient thought.
ˈhothouse noun
a glass-house kept warm for growing plants in. He grows orchids in his hothouse.
ˈhot-plate noun
1. the part of a cooker on which food is heated for cooking.
2. a portable heated plate of metal etc for keeping plates of food etc hot.
be in hot water, get into hot water
to be in or get into trouble.
hot uppast tense, past participle ˈhotted verb
to increase; to become more exciting etc.
in hot pursuit
chasing as fast as one can. The thief ran off, with the shopkeeper in hot pursuit.
like hot cakes
very quickly. These books are selling like hot cakes.
References in classic literature ?
You were a good deal cut up yourself, Tom, two weeks ago, when those young ladies left your hothouse door open, with a frosty east wind blowing right in; you said it killed a good many of your plants.
Who from seeing choice plants in a hothouse, can magnify some into the dimensions of forest trees, and crowd others into an entangled jungle?
The trappings of warriors of Okar aided in the deception; and for wear beyond the hothouse cities we each had suits of the black- and yellow-striped orluk.
John no one thwarted, much less punished; though he twisted the necks of the pigeons, killed the little pea-chicks, set the dogs at the sheep, stripped the hothouse vines of their fruit, and broke the buds off the choicest plants in the conservatory: he called his mother "old girl," too; sometimes reviled her for her dark skin, similar to his own; bluntly disregarded her wishes; not unfrequently tore and spoiled her silk attire; and he was still "her own darling.
It had snowed the day before and the path to the hothouse, along which the prince was in the habit of walking, had been swept: the marks of the broom were still visible in the snow and a shovel had been left sticking in one of the soft snowbanks that bordered both sides of the path.
Fierce, formidable fighters from the hothouse cities of the frozen north.
The firelight shadows were dancing over the walls; the cats were purring; and a huge bowl of hothouse chrysanthemums, sent to Phil by one of the victims, shone through the golden gloom like creamy moons.
And how poor her one wee white rose must look beside all the hothouse flowers the others wore
I have not yet said that a boy should be taught to rush into the snares of life, - or even wilfully to seek temptation for the sake of exercising his virtue by overcoming it; - I only say that it is better to arm and strengthen your hero, than to disarm and enfeeble the foe; - and if you were to rear an oak sapling in a hothouse, tending it carefully night and day, and shielding it from every breath of wind, you could not expect it to become a hardy tree, like that which has grown up on the mountain-side, exposed to all the action of the elements, and not even sheltered from the shock of the tempest.
A grand arch, cut in the upper wall at one end, surmounted an oaken orchestra, with an open room behind it, where hothouse plants and stalls for refreshments were disposed; an agreeable resort for gentlemen disposed to loiter, and yet to exchange the occasional crush down below for a more commodious point of view.
Craig had been proud to show his taste and his hothouse plants on the occasion.
That is my little wild strawberry, Hunsden, whose sweetness made me careless of your hothouse grapes.