hours


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hour

 (our)
n.
1. One of the 24 equal parts of a day.
2.
a. One of the points on a timepiece marking off 12 or 24 successive intervals of 60 minutes, from midnight to noon and noon to midnight or from midnight to midnight.
b. The time of day indicated by a 12-hour clock.
c. hours The time of day determined on a 24-hour basis: 1730 hours is 5:30 pm.
3. A unit of measure of longitude or right ascension, equal to 15° or 1/24 of a great circle.
4.
a. A customary or fixed time: the dinner hour.
b. hours A set or customary period of time for a specified activity: banking hours.
5.
a. A particular time: their hour of need.
b. A significant time: Her hour had come.
c. The present time: the man of the hour.
6.
a. The work that can be accomplished in an hour.
b. The distance that can be traveled in an hour.
7.
a. A single session of a school day or class.
b. A credit hour.
8. hours Ecclesiastical The canonical hours.
Idiom:
long hours
A longer than usual or customary period of time for a given activity: worked long hours to finish the project on time.

[Middle English, from Old French houre, from Latin hōra, from Greek hōrā, season, time; see yēr- in Indo-European roots.]

hours

(aʊəz)
pl n
1. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a period regularly or customarily appointed for work, business, etc
2. one's times of rising and going to bed (esp in the phrases keep regular, irregular, or late hours)
3. an indefinite period of time
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms)
a. the seven times of the day laid down for the recitation of the prayers of the divine office
b. the prayers recited at these times
5. the small hours the hours just after midnight
6. till all hours until very late

Hours

(aʊəz)
pl n
(Classical Myth & Legend) another word for the Horae
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hours - a period of time assigned for workhours - a period of time assigned for work; "they work long hours"
work time - a time period when you are required to work
duty period, work shift, shift - the time period during which you are at work
2.hours - an indefinite period of time; "they talked for hours"
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
This meant longer hours of travel, and Daylight, for good measure and for a margin against accidents, hit the trail for twelve hours a day.
Without allowing himself even to think of what was to come, of how it would end, judging from his inquiries as to the usual duration of these ordeals, Levin had in his imagination braced himself to bear up and to keep a tight rein on his feelings for five hours, and it had seemed to him he could do this.
Now, for thirty-six hours we have been hidden under the water, and already the heavy atmosphere of the Nautilus requires renewal.
Then we sent them home under Brigadier-General Fanny Marsh; then the Lieutenant-General and I went off on a gallop over the plains for about three hours, and were lazying along home in the middle of the afternoon, when we met Jimmy Slade, the drummer-boy, and he saluted and asked the Lieutenant-General if she had heard the news, and she said no, and he said:
As I interpreted the writing of the apparition, I had still some hours at my disposal.
Two hours and a quarter -- that is nothing; we are well mounted, are we not, Porthos?
It was too early yet to tell anything-- the bank would not open for nearly three hours.
My departure is to be," said he, "at break of day, three o'clock in the morning; I have then fifteen hours before me.
The happiness with which their time now passed, every employment voluntary, every laugh indulged, every meal a scene of ease and good humour, walking where they liked and when they liked, their hours, pleasures, and fatigues at their own command, made her thoroughly sensible of the restraint which the general's presence had imposed, and most thankfully feel their present release from it.
Before many hours elapsed it would be necessary to start on my journey to Cumberland.
The earth was but a day old, having been new the night before at twelve; and two days must elapse before its crescent, freed from the solar rays, would serve as a clock to the Selenites, as in its rotary movement each of its points after twenty-four hours repasses the same lunar meridian.
One sees so many students abroad at all hours, that he presently begins to wonder if they ever have any working-hours.